Welcome, Guest

 or  Register
NewsFeed

Why didn't settlers get wiped out by Indigenous diseases?
#1
devil 
Your thoughts on this subject would be appreciated.
Frigg, Full Throttle, phxsparks, sivil, ~mc~  likes this!
Reply Share
#2
Settlers had already been exposed to the major diseases.
Any diseases the natives had were not strong enough to attack the immune systems of the settlers.
The exception to this is Malaria - mosquito introduces bacteria into host (a person), another mosquito bites and transfers bacteria to the next host.... ECT....
Malaria wasn't known until the Europeans started exploring the tropics - then it spread.
Malaria killed millions and still kills to this day......
"I will not go quietly into the night"
Reply Share
#3
Because they were the non symptomatic carriers.
"Why don't you try speaking in words instead of your damn dirty lies?"
~Louise Belcher
Reply Share
#4
(04-08-2019, 11:30 PM)Grendelmort Wrote: Settlers had already been exposed to the major diseases.
Any diseases the natives had were not strong enough to attack the immune systems of the settlers.
The exception to this is Malaria - mosquito introduces bacteria into host (a person), another mosquito bites and transfers bacteria to the next host.... ECT....
Malaria wasn't known until the Europeans started exploring the tropics - then it spread.
Malaria killed millions and still kills to this day......

Malaria is not contagious from human to human.

Next.
Reply Share
#5
(04-08-2019, 11:37 PM)Pure Rock fury Wrote: Because they were the non symptomatic carriers.

So they did not have "Disease"?

I'm pretty sure there were many plagues before settlement.

I choose the word "settlement" Over "white settlement" for I don't believe all settlers were white.
Frigg, Lily, sivil  likes this!
Reply Share
#6
(04-08-2019, 11:38 PM)D3VILSR3J3CT Wrote:
(04-08-2019, 11:30 PM)Grendelmort Wrote: Settlers had already been exposed to the major diseases.
Any diseases the natives had were not strong enough to attack the immune systems of the settlers.
The exception to this is Malaria - mosquito introduces bacteria into host (a person), another mosquito bites and transfers bacteria to the next host.... ECT....
Malaria wasn't known until the Europeans started exploring the tropics - then it spread.
Malaria killed millions and still kills to this day......

Malaria is not a contagious from human to human.  

Next.

You are right, but it is known as a Phage - just living in the area in which it exists exposes you to it.
You don't catch Typhus from another person but from the water source.
"I will not go quietly into the night"
Reply Share
#7
(04-08-2019, 11:43 PM)Grendelmort Wrote:
(04-08-2019, 11:38 PM)D3VILSR3J3CT Wrote:
(04-08-2019, 11:30 PM)Grendelmort Wrote: Settlers had already been exposed to the major diseases.
Any diseases the natives had were not strong enough to attack the immune systems of the settlers.
The exception to this is Malaria - mosquito introduces bacteria into host (a person), another mosquito bites and transfers bacteria to the next host.... ECT....
Malaria wasn't known until the Europeans started exploring the tropics - then it spread.
Malaria killed millions and still kills to this day......

Malaria is not a contagious from human to human.  

Next.

You are right, but it is known as a Phage - just living in the area in which it exists exposes you to it.
You don't catch Typhus from another person but from the water source.

Closer than a mosquito.
Fleas ticks and lice live upon the person.

I don't mean to be antagonistic.
Just thought this was an interesting topic.

It's very strange.
I feel the immune system subject of your last post resonates.

But why?
Frigg, sivil, SoldiersAngel  likes this!
Reply Share
#8
I'll wager it is because there were so many fewer people then and thus fewer vectors.

[Image: nvIW4Dc.gif]

PAN/Syphilis

Think for yourself
Apache54, PickleSnout, sivil  likes this!
Reply Share
#9
(04-08-2019, 11:49 PM)D3VILSR3J3CT Wrote:
(04-08-2019, 11:43 PM)Grendelmort Wrote:
(04-08-2019, 11:38 PM)D3VILSR3J3CT Wrote: Malaria is not a contagious from human to human.  

Next.

You are right, but it is known as a Phage - just living in the area in which it exists exposes you to it.
You don't catch Typhus from another person but from the water source.

Closer than a mosquito.  
Fleas ticks and lice live upon the person.  

I don't mean to be antagonistic.
Just thought this was an interesting topic.  

It's very strange.  
I feel the immune system subject of your last post resonates.  

But why?

No problem man, a good debate is needed on this.

Consider the these diseases (not all inclusive) that kill millions each year
Typhus
Cholera
Malaria
Plague
Dengue Fever

All of these are "secondary transmission" ie you drink the water, are bitten by the fly, mosquito, flea..

Now consider the "contagious" diseases (not all inclusive) that can spread from person to person.
Smallpox
Measles
Flu
Hemorragic Fever
Ebola

These are spread from person to person but tend to be regional/localized and "burn" themselves out over time but still claim a large number of casualties.
"I will not go quietly into the night"
Apache54, Frigg, sivil, SoldiersAngel  likes this!
Reply Share
#10
The settlers gargled with fire water ?

I read about the Plague rolling through London. The fleas didn't make it to the country side.

The smart folks (Newton) got the hell outa Dodge.


The Great Plague, lasting from 1665 to 1666, was the last major epidemic of the bubonic plague to occur in England. It happened within the centuries-long time period of the Second Pandemic, an extended period of intermittent bubonic plague epidemics which originated in China in 1331, the first year of the Black Death, an outbreak which included other forms such as pneumonic plague, and lasted until 1750.[1]
The Great Plague killed an estimated 100,000 people—almost a quarter of London's population—in 18 months.[2][3] The plague was caused by the Yersinia pestis bacterium,[4] which is usually transmitted through the bite of an infected rat flea.[5]
The 1665–66 epidemic was on a far smaller scale than the earlier Black Death pandemic; it was remembered afterwards as the "great" plague mainly because it was the last widespread outbreak of bubonic plague in England during the 400-year timespan of the Second Pandemic.[6][7]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Plague_of_London
"We were in the jungle, there were too many of us, we had access to too much money, too much equipment, and little by little we went insane."

--Francis Ford Coppola
http://theseventies.berkeley.edu/godfath...amily-man/


Reply Share