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WHAT Knocked These Trees Down?
#1




Meteorological Mystery Surrounds What Caused Massive Tree Fall in Northwest Washington

A meteorologist in northwestern Washington is trying to solve a meteorology mystery surrounding a massive tree fall in Olympic Park.

More than 100 trees fell in an area on the north side of Lake Quinault on the Olympic Peninsula just after midnight on Jan. 27. Cliff Mass, a Seattle meteorologist and professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington, is trying to figure out why.

According to a two-part post he wrote for his blog, Cliff Mass Weather and Climate, early reports seemed to indicate that a microburst was responsible for the tree fall. Mass became skeptical that winds from a microburst would be sufficient to topple the large trees, particularly since some fell while others were snapped at the base of the tree.

https://weather.com/news/news/2018-02-08...washington
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#2
The Mystery Tree Fall Near Lake Quinault: Why Did It Happen? Part II

One important development: Janet Cole of the National Park Service visited the site yesterday. Bill Bacchus, chief scientist of Olympic National Park, sent me this map of the damage, based on Janet's survey of the scene, and the following narrative:

"Most of the trees appeared to be wind thrown, but as you can see from the photos, many were also broken near the base. The amount of trees down was inconsistent, in some areas, nearly every tree is down, but the majority of the area seemed to have lost about 40-60% of standing trees. ... I am attaching an image which shows Janet's rough estimate of the blow down area including arrows showing the direction of most blowdown. Near the drainage outlet, the trees seemed to have fallen southeast, while the western edge trees were oriented more north south. In the eastern edge, the trees were closer to east/west"
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Another interesting piece of evidence, in fact something quite unique in such weather detection work, is the seismic record at Quinault, something sent me me by Dr. John Vidale, who used to be WA State Seismologist. At 1:26 AM that morning there was a lot of activity...and no tremors were noted at other regional stations. Dr. Vidale suggests that it may represent the tremor produced by huge, falling trees. Fascinating. More evidence for the timing.

http://cliffmass.blogspot.com/2018/02/th...ake_7.html
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#3
Probably tptb playing with their tech toys.
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#4
Well this is weird Thinking
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#5
Sad. Not much evidence for microburst it seems.

No mention of the condition of the trees prior to their fall.
I'd suspect some structural (maybe fungus) weakness in the
trees that then succumbed more easily to strong winds.

Hope to learn more.
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#6
Some really interesting comments at the second link:

http://cliffmass.blogspot.com/2018/02/th...ake_7.html

Including similar occurrences in the area going back over the past century.
A unique weather phenomenon is discussed as is past tornadic activity.

At least one post states that some of the trees were rotted.
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#7
(02-11-2018, 10:23 PM)Aquarius Wrote: Probably tptb playing with their tech toys.

From the blog responses:
" S SFebruary 8, 2018 at 10:18 AM
maybe this will shed some light on it...

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/f...-training/"

You aren't the only one suggesting that one. Hmmmmm.....
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#8
@Pure Rock Fury Forgot to note that the war games
stuff is also discussed in the comments. Very troubling!
Angry
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#9
@Verity
Noticed that one of the people responding to the blog was a part of the clean up crew and said almost all of the trees were 2nd growth hemlock trees with shallow root roots. (They came up with the full root ball). The big mystery seems to be the fan pattern they fell in doesn't match any data (at the time of the writing) that showed a microburst or straight line winds that match the pattern.
"Why don't you just speak with your words instead of your damn dirty lies?"
~Louise Belcher.
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#10
(02-12-2018, 01:20 AM)Pure Rock Fury Wrote: @Verity
Noticed that one of the people responding to the blog was a part of the clean up crew and said almost all of the trees were 2nd growth hemlock trees with shallow root roots.  (They came up with the full root ball).  The big mystery seems to be the fan pattern they fell in doesn't match any data (at the time of the writing) that showed a microburst or straight line winds that match the pattern.

I did see that post about the shallow roots, @Pure Rock Fury though
I missed that it was someone who saw it up close and personal (I
had thought they might be judging from the photos). It seems a lot of
the coastal trees (like the redwoods) have shallow roots. We really have
to worry about them toppling here in high winds/other inclement
weather (SF Bay Area).

Always like to hear local perspectives and yes it does sound like people
are stumped (no pun intended) all around.

I thought the ideas about the lake proximity were also interesting
and something that also occurred to me as factoring in somehow.

And I was also glad to see at least one peep throw out BigFoot as that
occurred to me as well as an outside possibility. Chuckle
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