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WaPo: Trump's Favorite Food Has Russian Connection
#21
My food always seems to have a Mexico connection

Throw me over the wall

Aaahhh
Commandante Frio, ttfn, WNC  likes this!
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#22
WaPoop is what Liberals eat up.
“The right man in the wrong place can make all the difference in the world.” -- G-man, Half-Life 2.
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#23
(08-01-2019, 12:18 PM)~mc~ Wrote: My food always seems to have a Mexico connection

Throw me over the wall

Aaahhh

[Image: ?u=https%3A%2F%2Fmedia.tenor.com%2Fimage...or.gif&f=1]


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Celebrating Over 30 Years as a " Designated Paper Terrorist " - I Will Stand Corrected - No Legal Advice or Recommended Course of Action Expressed or Implied

The Constitution - Estate in Trust for the Heirs of Freedom - Local Link
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#24
(08-01-2019, 12:18 PM)~mc~ Wrote: My food always seems to have a Mexico connection

Throw me over the wall

Aaahhh

[Image: Vp5jPGp.gif]

Chuckle
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VENI VIDI CASTRATAVI ILLEGITIMOS


I Am A Fringe Loyalist...


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#25
So what else can You expect from Taco Bell Hell ?


[Image: n3ju4da8k031qnk42yuq]


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Celebrating Over 30 Years as a " Designated Paper Terrorist " - I Will Stand Corrected - No Legal Advice or Recommended Course of Action Expressed or Implied

The Constitution - Estate in Trust for the Heirs of Freedom - Local Link
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#26
History of Hamburg Meat

It was actually a bit more circuitous route from the grill to the bun. The term "hamburger" derives from the name of the city of Hamburg in Germany, known for exporting high-quality beef. It first showed up in print in 1834 in America on the menu at New York's Delmonico Restaurant, where the chopped and formed "Hamburg steak" was a prominent item.

In the late 19th century, Dr. James Henry Salisbury used chopped beef patties to cure Civil War soldiers suffering from camp diarrhea. Dr. Salisbury advocated eating cooked beef three times a day for a healthy constitution. The term "Salisbury steak" appeared in print in 1897 and the seasoned and broiled patty is considered a forerunner of the modern hamburger.

https://www.thespruceeats.com/history-of...ef-1807605


Apparently My Mistake on Rome being Russia ' s inspiration .

Tracing history back thousands of years, we learn that even the ancient Egyptians ate ground meat, and down through the ages we also find that ground meat has been shaped into patties and eaten all over the world under many different name.

1209 – 1121 – Genghis Khan (1167-1227), crowned the “emperor of all emperors,” and his army of fierce Mongol horsemen, known as the “Golden Horde,” conquered two thirds of the then known world. The Mongols were a fast-moving, cavalry-based army that rode small sturdy ponies. They stayed in their saddles for long period of time, sometimes days without ever dismounting. They had little opportunity to stop and build a fire for their meal.

The entire village would follow behind the army on great wheeled carts they called “yurts,” leading huge herds of sheep, goats, oxen, and horses. As the army needed food that could be carried on their mounts and eaten easily with one hand while they rode, ground meat was the perfect choice. They would use scrapings of lamb or mutton which were formed into flat patties. They softened the meat by placing them under the saddles of their horses while riding into battle. When it was time to eat, the meat would be eaten raw, having been tenderized by the saddle and the back of the horse.

1238 – When Genghis Khan’s grandson, Khubilai Khan (1215-1294), invaded Moscow, they naturally brought their unique dietary ground meat with them. The Russians adopted it into their own cuisine with the name “Steak Tartare,” (Tartars being their name for the Mongols). Over many years, Russian chefs adapted and developed this dish and refining it with chopped onions and raw eggs.

Old Cookbooks:

1758 – By the mid-18th century, German immigrants also begin arriving in England. One recipe, titled “Hamburgh Sausage,” appeared in Hannah Glasse’s 1758 English cookbook called The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy. It consisted of chopped beef, suet, and spices. The author recommended that this sausage be served with toasted bread. Hannah Glasse’s cookbook was also very popular in Colonial America, although it was not published in the United States until 1805. This American edition also contained the “Hamburgh Sausage” recipe with slight revisions.

https://whatscookingamerica.net/History/...istory.htm


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Celebrating Over 30 Years as a " Designated Paper Terrorist " - I Will Stand Corrected - No Legal Advice or Recommended Course of Action Expressed or Implied

The Constitution - Estate in Trust for the Heirs of Freedom - Local Link
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#27
(07-31-2019, 10:13 PM)MaximalGravity Wrote: Think about this piece any time the once great Washington Post (Amazon News) is cited. You don't think there is FAKE NEWS..

https://twitter.com/washingtonpost/statu...4246894595

https://twitter.com/SilenceFranklin/stat...9056132097

Jptdknpa
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#28
Now I'm frickin hungry! Dah!
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