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The secret US prisons you've never heard of before
#1




The government calls these prisons Communications Management Units, or CMUs. Prisoners and guards call them Little Guantanamo.
They are islands unto themselves, but unlike Gitmo, they’re right here at home, floating within larger federal prisons.
There are two CMUs. One is inside the prison in Terre Haute, Indiana.
The second is inside this prison in Marion, Illinois. [iii]
Neither underwent the formal review process required by law when they were opened.[iv]
CMU prisoners have all been convicted of crimes. Some cases are questionable, and some involve threats and violence. I’m not here to argue the guilt or innocence of any prisoner. I’m here because, as Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall said, when the prison gates slam shut, prisoners do not lose their human quality.[v]
Every prisoner I’ve interviewed has said there are three flecks of light in the darkness of prison[vi]: phone calls, letters, and visits from family. CMUs are not solitary confinement, but they radically restrict all of these, to levels that meet or exceed the most extreme prisons in the country.
Their phone calls can be limited to 45 minutes per month, compared to the 300 minutes other prisoners receive.[vii]
Their letters can be limited to six pieces of paper. [viii]
Their visits can be restricted to 4 hours per month, compared[ix] to the Supermax where Olympic Park bomber Eric Rudolph can receive 35 hours.[x] On top of that, CMU visits are non-contact, meaning prisoners aren’t allowed to hug their family.
As one CMU prisoner has said: “We are not being tortured here, except psychologically.”[xi]
The government won’t say who is imprisoned here. [xii] [xiii] But through court documents, public records requests, and interviews with current and former prisoners, small windows into the CMUs have opened.

There’s an estimated 60-70 prisoners in CMUs, and they are overwhelmingly Muslim.[xiv]
They have included people like Dr. Rafil Dhafir, who violated the economic sanctions on Iraq by sending medical supplies for the children there. [xv]
And they’ve included people like Yassin Aref. Aref and his family fled to New York from Saddam Hussein’s Iraq as refugees. [xvi]
He was arrested in 2004 as part of an FBI sting. Aref is an imam, and he thought he was being asked to bear witness to a loan, which is a tradition in Islamic culture. It turned out that one of the people involved in the loan was an FBI informant trying to enlist someone else in a fake attack. Aref didn’t know. He was convicted of conspiracy to provide material support to a terrorist group.
CMUs also include some non-Muslim prisoners. The guards refer to them as “balancers.”[xvii] Meaning, they help balance out the racial numbers, in hopes of deflecting lawsuits.

These balancers include animal rights and environmental activists, like Daniel McGowan. McGowan was convicted of participating in two arsons in the name of defending the environment as part of the Earth Liberation Front.

During his sentencing, McGowan was afraid he would be sent to a rumored secret prison for terrorists. The judge dismissed him, saying those fears were not “supported by any facts.”[xviii]

That might be because the government hasn’t fully explained why some prisoners end up in a CMU, and who is accountable for that decision.
Prisoners are transferred out of general population and into a CMU without warning.

Cite: http://willpotter.com/CMU/

When the federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) created the first Communications Management Unit (CMU) in 2006, nobody outside the prison bureaucracy — not the prisoners sent there, not their lawyers, not the public — knew of its existence. It was a prison within a medium security prison in Terre Haute, Indiana, where Muslim men, some convicted of “terrorism-related crimes,” were being quarantined from the general prison population and cut off from their families and their communities. The CMU is housed in what had been a decrepit, abandoned building in the prison compound: the closed death row facility that formerly held Timothy McVeigh. The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) began researching its existence when prisoner after prisoner wrote letters to them desperately seeking help from behind bars to have contact with their loved ones. CCR then mounted a legal challenge in 2010.

When other prisoners and the outside world noticed what was happening, both CMUs (a second opened in Marion, Ohio) quickly became labeled “terrorist units” by those in the general prison population. Thus the domestic myth was reinforced that the government is punishing and segregating Muslim terrorists. In media coverage the CMUs were called Little Gitmo and Guantanamo North, given that they housed Muslim men, but this also mirrored the myth that the notorious, offshore prison is keeping “the worst of the worst” terrorists off the battlefield.

CMUs differ from Guantanamo in a very significant way, however. All the prisoners in CMUs have been convicted of crimes (many on the basis of FBI-paid informants — more about that later), while almost all prisoners in Guantanamo have never been tried or convicted. The few convictions have been in “military tribunals” in which defendants are denied proper due process.

The BOP plays a cat and mouse game to avoid having to disclose information about or close the CMUs. After being challenged on the basis of religious discrimination, the prison administration began admitting non-Muslim “balancers” to the prison: environmental activists, organizers for prisoner rights, others who might want to “recruit and radicalize others.” Thus the CMUs were expanded into prisons for political activists and dissidents. However, even today 60% of the prisoners are Muslim, while only 6% of the overall prison population is Muslim.

The CMUs were established without the requisite public notification, and prisoners were transferred to the units without being told where or why they were sent there. They were given no process by which to be restored to the general prison population. Their contact with the outside world was severely limited: they were allowed much less time than other prisoners to speak by phone or have visits from their immediate families and were denied all physical contact with their family members during visits. Communication with friends and relatives beyond their immediate families was severely limited.

Cite: http://www.witnessagainsttorture.com/CMUs
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#2
there are secret prisons all around the world.
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#3
(04-08-2019, 10:41 AM)sivil Wrote:



The government calls these prisons Communications Management Units, or CMUs. Prisoners and guards call them Little Guantanamo.
They are islands unto themselves, but unlike Gitmo, they’re right here at home, floating within larger federal prisons.
There are two CMUs. One is inside the prison in Terre Haute, Indiana.
The second is inside this prison in Marion, Illinois. [iii]
Neither underwent the formal review process required by law when they were opened.[iv]
CMU prisoners have all been convicted of crimes. Some cases are questionable, and some involve threats and violence. I’m not here to argue the guilt or innocence of any prisoner. I’m here because, as Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall said, when the prison gates slam shut, prisoners do not lose their human quality.[v]
Every prisoner I’ve interviewed has said there are three flecks of light in the darkness of prison[vi]: phone calls, letters, and visits from family. CMUs are not solitary confinement, but they radically restrict all of these, to levels that meet or exceed the most extreme prisons in the country.
Their phone calls can be limited to 45 minutes per month, compared to the 300 minutes other prisoners receive.[vii]
Their letters can be limited to six pieces of paper. [viii]
Their visits can be restricted to 4 hours per month, compared[ix] to the Supermax where Olympic Park bomber Eric Rudolph can receive 35 hours.[x] On top of that, CMU visits are non-contact, meaning prisoners aren’t allowed to hug their family.
As one CMU prisoner has said: “We are not being tortured here, except psychologically.”[xi]
The government won’t say who is imprisoned here. [xii] [xiii] But through court documents, public records requests, and interviews with current and former prisoners, small windows into the CMUs have opened.

There’s an estimated 60-70 prisoners in CMUs, and they are overwhelmingly Muslim.[xiv]
They have included people like Dr. Rafil Dhafir, who violated the economic sanctions on Iraq by sending medical supplies for the children there. [xv]
And they’ve included people like Yassin Aref. Aref and his family fled to New York from Saddam Hussein’s Iraq as refugees. [xvi]
He was arrested in 2004 as part of an FBI sting. Aref is an imam, and he thought he was being asked to bear witness to a loan, which is a tradition in Islamic culture. It turned out that one of the people involved in the loan was an FBI informant trying to enlist someone else in a fake attack. Aref didn’t know. He was convicted of conspiracy to provide material support to a terrorist group.
CMUs also include some non-Muslim prisoners. The guards refer to them as “balancers.”[xvii] Meaning, they help balance out the racial numbers, in hopes of deflecting lawsuits.

These balancers include animal rights and environmental activists, like Daniel McGowan. McGowan was convicted of participating in two arsons in the name of defending the environment as part of the Earth Liberation Front.

During his sentencing, McGowan was afraid he would be sent to a rumored secret prison for terrorists. The judge dismissed him, saying those fears were not “supported by any facts.”[xviii]

That might be because the government hasn’t fully explained why some prisoners end up in a CMU, and who is accountable for that decision.
Prisoners are transferred out of general population and into a CMU without warning.

Cite:  http://willpotter.com/CMU/

When the federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) created the first Communications Management Unit (CMU) in 2006, nobody outside the prison bureaucracy — not the prisoners sent there, not their lawyers, not the public — knew of its existence.  It was a prison within a medium security prison in Terre Haute, Indiana, where Muslim men, some convicted of “terrorism-related crimes,” were being quarantined from the general prison population and cut off from their families and their communities.  The CMU is housed in what had been a decrepit, abandoned building in the prison compound: the closed death row facility that formerly held Timothy McVeigh. The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) began researching  its existence when prisoner after prisoner wrote letters to them desperately seeking help from behind bars to have contact with their loved ones.  CCR then mounted a legal challenge in 2010.

When other prisoners and the outside world noticed what was happening, both CMUs (a second opened in Marion, Ohio) quickly became labeled “terrorist units” by those in the general prison population. Thus the domestic myth was reinforced that the government is punishing and segregating Muslim terrorists.  In media coverage the CMUs were called Little Gitmo and Guantanamo North, given that they housed Muslim men, but this also mirrored the myth that the notorious, offshore prison is keeping “the worst of the worst” terrorists off the battlefield.

CMUs differ from Guantanamo in a very significant way, however.  All the prisoners in CMUs have been convicted of crimes (many on the basis of FBI-paid informants — more about that later), while almost all prisoners in Guantanamo have never been tried or convicted. The few convictions have been in “military tribunals” in which defendants are denied proper due process.

The BOP plays a cat and mouse game to avoid having to disclose information about or close the CMUs.  After being challenged on the basis of religious discrimination, the prison administration began admitting non-Muslim “balancers” to the prison: environmental activists, organizers for prisoner rights, others who might want to “recruit and radicalize others.” Thus the CMUs were expanded into prisons for political activists and dissidents.  However, even today 60% of the prisoners are Muslim, while only 6% of the overall prison population is Muslim.

The CMUs were established without the requisite public notification, and prisoners were transferred to the units without being told where or why they were sent there. They were given no process by which to be restored to the general prison population.  Their contact with the outside world was severely limited: they were allowed much less time than other prisoners to speak by phone or have visits from their immediate families and were denied all physical contact with their family members during visits. Communication with friends and relatives beyond their immediate families was severely limited.

Cite:  http://www.witnessagainsttorture.com/CMUs

The mind is a prison too...
Fuck That Shit!
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#4
(04-08-2019, 04:27 PM)cutecumber Wrote: there are secret prisons all around the world.

Supposedly some are on boats out at sea.
My father used to say: Plant your feet and stand firm. The only question is where you put your feet.

-Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter
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#5
Who guards these secret prisons?
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#6
(04-08-2019, 04:50 PM)DRUMZ Wrote: Who guards these secret prisons?

they are military facilities.
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#7
It seems like a stricter prison for more difficult cases.
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#8
(04-08-2019, 04:27 PM)cutecumber Wrote: there are secret prisons all around the world.

If they only had one or more for the scum bag politicians.
Well aren't you jolly.
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#9
They would not like me. I would make 'areas' and I'm sure that they do in the prison system. And there would more than likely be one just like this one. You don't want radicals in the general population. They stir up the peons. You get rid of the radicals. And so you put them in an area where they are radicalizing other radicals just like them. As this would be putting them into a 'bubble' where they will get reinforcement all the time, yes, you would want to restrict their outside access and influence. And I can see why they wouldn't want them to have any touching visits. I've never been to a prison to see someone. The one county jail I went to see someone at, we couldn't touch those guys. They were behind glass and you just walked up and went into the little room after you went through the usual metal detector at the door. They didn't watch you or anything. You don't have access to the prisoner you came to see. You have to leave anything you want them to have at the window with their name and number on it. And they have restrictions on that. In Harrison county jail (not the same jail I visited but I knew people that went to this one), you could send them socks and underwear but only white. Had to be white and the girl's had to be bikini at the smallest. No thongs. White nightgowns and I think that's all you were allowed to send them for clothes. Books and magazines have to come from the source/bookseller/amazon, you can not drop them off. There are rules and it's all a pain in the butt to follow.

Letters are read going in and out by someone. You don't get an unopened letter in jail. And sometimes, you don't get your letter nor is your letter sent out. Depending on what you write. So I don't see what these people are complaining about. I think county allowed two visits a week. 30 minutes. So that's 4 hours a month visit, no touching, they could call you collect only but they could talk as long as they wanted. Collect mind you and very expensive collect calls too. Special jail pricing. You didn't call much if you wanted 'commissary' money. These guys are just whiners. Big ass babies. No pity from me. Crap. What did they expect? And no one in prison is guilty. Ask them or ask their families. They all will tell ya about how good and great Mamumada, Ray-Ray, or BillyRay are. Good upstanding fine citizens that wouldn't hurt a flea that was eating them alive.  Eyeroll

I'm all for these thingies. Good for them. Save themselves some hassle down the road from these radicals. They shouldn't have been stupid at what they did and they wouldn't have gotten caught. There are lots of criminals out there that have no record. These guys are not them. These guys were especially stupid. Stupid gets what stupid deserves.  Yeah3
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#10
Picture if you will, OIL Tanker and Container SIZED Ships!
That Never DOCK or Make Port, Always in international waters!

Maximum Security "PRISON SHIPS!"
No One Gets out Alive!
[Image: ERV6PXM.gif]
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