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The new Commander Michel Ney thread! yay!!!
#1
Michel Ney - Early Life:

Born in Saarlouis, France on January 10, 1769, Michel Ney was the son of master barrel cooper Pierre Ney and his wife Margarethe. Due to Saarlouis' location in Lorraine, Ney was raised bilingual and was fluent in both French and German. Coming of age, he received his education at the Collège des Augustins and became a notary in his hometown. After a brief stint as an overseer of mines, he ended his career as a civil servant and enlisted in the Colonel-General Hussar Regiment in 1787. Proving himself a gifted soldier, Ney swiftly moved through the non-commissioned ranks.

Michel Ney - The Hundred Days & Death:

Ney's loyalty to the new regime was quickly tested in 1815, with Napoleon's return to France from Elba. Swearing allegiance to the king, he began assembling forces to counter Napoleon and pledged to bring the former emperor back to Paris in an iron cage. Aware of Ney's plans, Napoleon sent him a letter encouraging him to rejoin his old commander. This Ney did on March 18, when he joined Napoleon at Auxerre

Three months later, Ney was made the commander of the left wing of the new Army of the North. In this role, he defeated the Duke of Wellington at the Battle of Quatre Bras on June 16, 1815. Two days later, Ney played a key role at the Battle of Waterloo. His most famous order during the decisive battle was to send forward the French cavalry against the allied lines. Surging forward, they were unable to break the squares formed by the British infantry and were forced to retreat.

Following the defeat at Waterloo, Ney was hunted down arrested. Taken into custody on August 3, he was tried for treason that December by the Chamber of Peers. Found guilty, he was executed by firing squad near the Luxembourg Garden on December 7, 1815. During his execution, Ney refused to wear a blindfold and insisted upon giving the order to fire himself. His final words were reportedly:
"
Soldiers, when I give the command to fire, fire straight at my heart. Wait for the order. It will be my last to you. I protest against my condemnation. I have fought a hundred battles for France, and not one against her... Soldiers Fire!”

[Image: 1200px-Marechal_Ney.jpg]
If you want to sing out, sing out, Cause there's a million ways to p-ossst... you know that there are.
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#2
This the thread you were telling me about??
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#3
Trump
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#4
Serious balls made into a barrel.. good call Jack.. and welcome!
People... Come into your life for a reason, a season or lifetime... Nice.



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#5
Through the most devastating of military marches, Michel Ney commanded Napoleon Bonaparte’s Rear Guard with exceptional Élan and Honor.



“That Man is a Lion”




“The Impossible Itself is Subservient to Courage Like His”






“He Was the Last of the Grande Armée to Leave That Deadly Land”








Napoleon Bonaparte’s Russian campaign of 1812 ranks as one of the worst military disasters in history. Only 50,000 men returned from an orginal 600,000, or of the 100,000 who marched into Moscow, less than 10,000 were to see France again. In the midst of this unparalleled destruction and loss of life, there rose a man whose service with the rear guard of the Grande Armée was a brilliant display of courage and determination. Marshal Ney’s iron will, resourcefulness, initiative, and leadership helped his remnant of the army reach the banks of the Nieman River in Russia and relative safety. The Emperor Napoleon recognized these achievements and as the terrible days of 1813 and 1814 approached, he came to rely more and more upon the services of “the Bravest of the Brave.”




Ney’s boldness halted the Russians. His actions also shamed some of his men who then followed their marshal’s example and took up arms. With a group of 30 men Ney held the gate open on the Vilna road until nightfall. Then, still fighting, withdrawing but not fleeing, marching with his men, he crossed Kovno and the Nieman River into Polish territory.






[Image: 431670.jpg]

[Image: retreat-ney-as-rearguard.jpg]









http://warfarehistorynetwork.com/daily/military-history/michel-neys-retreat/
If you want to sing out, sing out, Cause there's a million ways to p-ossst... you know that there are.
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