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The (Broken) American Food System
#21
I want to do some very small scale animal husbandry, rabbits for fur and meat, chickens for eggs, and a pigmy goat for milking.
Now, these are not huge animals, and do not need super large pens, yet..
That's alot of poop. My dog makes plenty of poop to scoop every week, and as I think of cleaning and caring for these creatures, I feel put off.
Now to safely render all that poop I'd need to compost. What do I do with all that compost? I have to garden. The garden feeds me, and scraps back to the animals as feed.
Lord help me, I feel too lazy to work. I never thought that would happen to me.
I guess at least I have a plan.

Right now I have a life of leisure. I would have trustworthy food at the cost of mere work. Is the trade off worth it?

Do any of you keep critters for food? Is it very time consuming, and does feed set you back a bunch?
Heartflowers
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#22
(01-17-2019, 09:07 PM)PickleSnout Wrote: I want to do some very small scale animal husbandry, rabbits for fur and meat, chickens for eggs, and a pigmy goat for milking.
Now, these are not huge animals, and do not need super large pens, yet..
That's alot of poop. My dog makes plenty of poop to scoop every week, and as I think of cleaning and caring for these creatures, I feel put off.
Now to safely render all that poop I'd need to compost. What do I do with all that compost? I have to garden. The garden feeds me, and scraps back to the animals as feed.
Lord help me, I feel too lazy to work. I never thought that would happen to me.
I guess at least I have a plan.

Right now I have a life of leisure.  I would have trustworthy food at the cost of mere work. Is the trade off worth it?

Do any of you keep critters for food? Is it very time consuming, and does feed set you back a bunch?

WE are in the SAME boat!! LOL, if i did not know better i could have sworn i wrote your post above! LOL
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#23
(01-17-2019, 08:55 PM)=42 Wrote:
(01-17-2019, 08:42 PM)dazedb42 Wrote: Just stop eating processed food, there's your problem, you folks can't eat anything without covering in a tin of this and a packet of that.  Eat fresh, there is nothing wrong with anything grown fresh whether GM or not. Wash your vegetables if you are concerned about chemical residue but just stop eating shit out of a packet.

You're lazy cooks for the most part who prefer convenience over healthy food.

Definitely a good place to start! Unfortunately conventional crops have chemical "residue" in the plant tissue, not just on the outside and the nutrient densities of these foods decrease every year.

Stop with the pseudo science bullshit please.
bigD111, sivil  likes this!
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#24
(01-17-2019, 09:07 PM)PickleSnout Wrote: I want to do some very small scale animal husbandry, rabbits for fur and meat, chickens for eggs, and a pigmy goat for milking.
Now, these are not huge animals, and do not need super large pens, yet..
That's alot of poop. My dog makes plenty of poop to scoop every week, and as I think of cleaning and caring for these creatures, I feel put off.
Now to safely render all that poop I'd need to compost. What do I do with all that compost? I have to garden. The garden feeds me, and scraps back to the animals as feed.
Lord help me, I feel too lazy to work. I never thought that would happen to me.
I guess at least I have a plan.

Right now I have a life of leisure.  I would have trustworthy food at the cost of mere work. Is the trade off worth it?

Do any of you keep critters for food? Is it very time consuming, and does feed set you back a bunch?

First, you need to have a number of animals appropriate to your available land and divide it into paddocks so you are using only 1 small piece at a time and rotate them frequently. This can be accomplished using relatively inexpensive electric net fencing. In the paddocks you have pasture grasses, etc... to at least partially contribute to feed. The manure fertilizes the "pasture", you don't have to pick it up and compost. There are a lot of variables including your climate. The idea is to use/graze one piece at a time while the rest recovers/regenerates.

Look up Joel Salatin on youtube, he literally wrote the book on this.

Whether it is worth it or not is up to you to decide.

Right now I just have 7 laying hens and a couple of ducks. This summer I will be purchasing some acreage to start a farm using Joel's model as basis.
I will start with meat chickens, laying hens, pigs and a few beef cattle. Eventually I will expand into other ventures.

I have been planning and studying this for nearly 7 years, but right now my knowledge of this is academic and not from practice, so take it for its worth.

I say give it a try.... Good luck
Because Settled Science is not science, it’s politics, a talking point, a means to a totalitarian end, even after reality proves this Settled Science is built on quicksand.
   ~ John Nolte
Citizen37082, PickleSnout, sivil  likes this!
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#25
(01-17-2019, 09:21 PM)dazedb42 Wrote:
(01-17-2019, 08:55 PM)=42 Wrote:
(01-17-2019, 08:42 PM)dazedb42 Wrote: Just stop eating processed food, there's your problem, you folks can't eat anything without covering in a tin of this and a packet of that.  Eat fresh, there is nothing wrong with anything grown fresh whether GM or not. Wash your vegetables if you are concerned about chemical residue but just stop eating shit out of a packet.

You're lazy cooks for the most part who prefer convenience over healthy food.

Definitely a good place to start! Unfortunately conventional crops have chemical "residue" in the plant tissue, not just on the outside and the nutrient densities of these foods decrease every year.

Stop with the pseudo science bullshit please.

Your opinion....... I'll agree to disagree.
Because Settled Science is not science, it’s politics, a talking point, a means to a totalitarian end, even after reality proves this Settled Science is built on quicksand.
   ~ John Nolte
bigD111, Citizen37082, sivil, WhiteAngel  likes this!
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#26
It wasn't consumer pressure, (1) it was to our advantage to find a solution, and we did.  We hated having sick calves and losing them, we finally figured out what the causes were, and we solved the problem.  Ours was a deficiency of copper in our feeds.  For others,it was a selenium deficiency, and for some, they had sulphur in the water which was tying up the copper.  It didn't help that our vets had less knowledge than we did.  The cows and calves both eat the mineral, and it has made all the cows much healthier too.  
Right now we are running 400 cows, we used to run 700, but not anymore.  We rent out our excess grass.   (2) We also raise some winter wheat, but none of it is GMO.   Never have.  There is some around, but it is rare, imho.  Most of the wheat these days is a hybrid, but that is not the same.  They cross different varieties to get the hybrids, and this is common practice.We do use roundup (glyphosate), because it is very cost effective, and (3) the only way we can no till farm.   (4) Until we hear from our universities that it is damaging the environment, or people's health, we will continue to do so.  (5) Hemp has been legalized, and we are looking at it, but would probably need irrigation to grow it, and that is not practical here.  I raise some oats and barley on occasion, and we put up a lot of hay!
[/quote]

1. Regardless of how you ended up removing/reducing antibiotics, everyone is better off (my opinion)

2. Are you using glyphosate to "dryoff" your wheat? It is my understanding that they abandoned roundup resistant wheat for this reason.

3. I would suggest that there are proven alternatives to glyphosate in no till. see "Gabe Brown" video below.

4. The WHO has determined glyphosate to be a known carcinogen. I don't necessarily trust the WHO, but university studies are sometimes funded by the companies whose products they are testing... if you get what I'm saying.

5. I would think that Hemp could be viable as a non irrigated crop in your area (Cut Bank?) again, check out the video. Much of Gabe's work centers on soil improvement for water infiltration and retention for dry land crops.



Because Settled Science is not science, it’s politics, a talking point, a means to a totalitarian end, even after reality proves this Settled Science is built on quicksand.
   ~ John Nolte
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#27
(01-17-2019, 09:52 PM)=42 Wrote:
(01-17-2019, 09:07 PM)PickleSnout Wrote: I want to do some very small scale animal husbandry, rabbits for fur and meat, chickens for eggs, and a pigmy goat for milking.
Now, these are not huge animals, and do not need super large pens, yet..
That's alot of poop. My dog makes plenty of poop to scoop every week, and as I think of cleaning and caring for these creatures, I feel put off.
Now to safely render all that poop I'd need to compost. What do I do with all that compost? I have to garden. The garden feeds me, and scraps back to the animals as feed.
Lord help me, I feel too lazy to work. I never thought that would happen to me.
I guess at least I have a plan.

Right now I have a life of leisure.  I would have trustworthy food at the cost of mere work. Is the trade off worth it?

Do any of you keep critters for food? Is it very time consuming, and does feed set you back a bunch?

First, you need to have a number of animals appropriate to your available land and divide it into paddocks so you are using only 1 small piece at a time and rotate them frequently. This can be accomplished using relatively inexpensive electric net fencing.  In the paddocks you have pasture grasses, etc... to at least partially contribute to feed. The manure fertilizes the "pasture", you don't have to pick it up and compost. There are a lot of variables including your climate. The idea is to use/graze one piece at a time while the rest recovers/regenerates.

Look up Joel Salatin on youtube, he literally wrote the book on this.

Whether it is worth it or not is up to you to decide.

Right now I just have 7 laying hens and a couple of ducks. This summer I will be purchasing some acreage to start a farm using Joel's model as basis.
I will start with meat chickens, laying hens, pigs and a few beef cattle. Eventually I will expand into other ventures.

I have been planning and studying this for nearly 7 years, but right now my knowledge of this is academic and not from practice, so take it for its worth.

I say give it a try.... Good luck
I was not thinking pens, but rolling cages that sit directly on the grass, then I can easily roll them to new grazing, clean, and they will be somewhat protected from predation. Thank you for the youtube vid info, I will check it out! Yeah3
Heartflowers
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#28
(01-17-2019, 06:52 PM)MysticPizza Wrote:
(01-17-2019, 06:37 PM)bigD111 Wrote: The beef industry, of which I am part of has been moving away from antibiotics for 15 years.  Here at the ranch, we use chelated minerals that keeps the cattle healthy and the calves, and that has eliminated 98% of antibiotic use.  The feedlots have done the same.  It is much better than it used to be.  The Hutterites are converting their chicken operations to open range, and that has also reduced the use of antibiotics.  There is still work to do, but we have heard from consumers and are responding!   Heartflowers

Kiss  I've noticed a growing trend with some brands of chicken as well. I get Loki a bag of leg quarters 3x a month and that serves as his base diet. One a day. Until a few months ago when I noticed the quarters were smaller...normal sized  Cheer  No more growth hormones? Yes please. Makes his food slightly more expensive but well worth his health. To all of you ranchers and farmers trying so hard to provide good,clean food.Hugs

Personally I'd rather have GMO's and cheap food than be malnourished because I can't afford things at the super markets.

All this all natural food is a scam to jack up prices and to regulate. Look at Europe, they decide who can sell in their markets. This is favoritism over businesses and knowing politicians, money is always involved.
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#29
I have to wonder if the blue rubber particles are actually more nutritious than the "nuggets". Chuckle

https://the-fringe.com/thread-tyson_food...rial_found
Because Settled Science is not science, it’s politics, a talking point, a means to a totalitarian end, even after reality proves this Settled Science is built on quicksand.
   ~ John Nolte
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#30
(02-01-2019, 03:03 PM)Karu Wrote: Monsanto’s “Malicious Conduct” & “Complete Manipulation of Science” Regarding Roundup Finally Exposed By Attorney Brent Wisner

One of the most intrepid GMO science researchers for over twenty years, Jeffrey Smith, of the Institute for Responsible Technology (IRT), interviewed Attorney Brent Wisner, the genius lead lawyer who apparently overwhelmed the legal system by finally getting Monsanto’s Papers, which documented “malicious conduct by a corporation” and “complete manipulation of science,” according to him during his representation of Mr. Dewayne Johnson in the Dewayne Johnson v. Monsanto lawsuit.

Jeffrey Smith and IRT produced a stunning repertoire of short video clips of his interview with Mr. Wisner, which are nothing less than stunning information regarding the fraud, concealment and scientific manipulation corporations use to get CDC/FDA/USDA/EPA approval(s) and / or licenses.

https://www.activistpost.com/2019/02/mon...isner.html
Because Settled Science is not science, it’s politics, a talking point, a means to a totalitarian end, even after reality proves this Settled Science is built on quicksand.
   ~ John Nolte
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