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Researchers test bone fragments suspected to be Santa's
#1
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A fragment of bone claimed to be from St Nicholas - the 4th-Century saintly inspiration for Father Christmas - has been radio carbon tested by the University of Oxford.

The test has found that the relic does date from the time of St Nicholas, who is believed to have died about 343AD.

While not providing proof that this is from the saint, it has been confirmed as authentically from that era.

The Oxford team says these are the first tests carried out on the bones.

Relics of St Nicholas, who died in modern-day Turkey, have been kept in the crypt of a church in Bari in Italy since the 11th Century.

Authentic age

But the popularity of the saint, and the associations with Christmas, have seen many fragments of bones being taken to other locations, raising questions about how many of these are authentic.

The tests in Oxford have been carried out on a fragment of pelvis, which had been in a church in France and is currently owned by a priest, Father Dennis O'Neill, from Illinois in the United States.
Image caption St Nicholas figures meeting in southern Germany this week, at the start of the Christmas season

The radio carbon dating tests, for the Oxford Relics Cluster at Keble College's Advanced Studies Centre, have confirmed that the bone is from the correct era for St Nicholas.

Prof Tom Higham, a director of the centre, says this is unlike many such relics which often turn out to be much later inventions.

"This bone fragment, in contrast, suggests that we could possibly be looking at remains from St Nicholas himself," says the Oxford archaeologist. _ read on

http://www.bbc.com/news/education-42239197
 The Sign Says, Quiet. Yo Yo's On Strings !
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#2
Hopefully they clone him and bring him back.. I have a large list I've been saving up!
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#3
Sure, however it's not "Santa." It would be "Saint Nicholas." No matter how much anyone prescribes or attaches the "Santa label" on to "Saint Nicholas," Saint Nicholas is not "Santa Claus."
It's all word play. Boots or Stockings by the Fireplace with Treats in exchange for gifts from Santa Claus is not Saint Nicholas gift giving to the poor, needy, prostituted in need of help; In need of saving. In need of salvation.
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#4
Lots of giving to the poor by organized groups. The CBC radio Corp just raised 3/4 of a million dollars to feed the needy. People understand that Christmas is the season of giving. Should be all yr round mind you.

The santa is also a Coca Cola invented advertising gimmick. The one in the department stores give the traditional Santa brings goodwill and toys for the children. Similar to Saint Nick. This is the western world way. In other countries is celebrated in different ways that also has a man with a white bearded man giving away toys. I see it's all the same started by St Nick.
 The Sign Says, Quiet. Yo Yo's On Strings !
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#5
(12-07-2017, 10:57 AM)Guest Wrote: Sure, however it's not "Santa." It would be "Saint Nicholas." No matter how much anyone prescribes or attaches the "Santa label" on to "Saint Nicholas," Saint Nicholas is not "Santa Claus."
It's all word play. Boots or Stockings by the Fireplace with Treats in exchange for gifts from Santa Claus is not Saint Nicholas gift giving to the poor, needy, prostituted in need of help; In need of saving. In need of salvation.

I agreed with most of your post until I got the the prostituted part. I never heard this in relation to Saint Nicolas so I looked it up-
Quote:The original saint was a Greek born 280 years after Christ who became bishop of Myra, a small Roman town in modern Turkey. Nicholas was neither fat nor jolly but developed a reputation as a fiery, wiry, and defiant defender of church doctrine during the "Great Persecution," when Bibles were put to the torch and priests made to renounce Christianity or face execution.

Nicholas defied these edicts and spent years in prison before Constantine brought Christianity to prominence in his empire. Nicholas's fame lived long after his death (on December 6 of some unknown year in the mid-fourth century) because he was associated with many miracles, and reverence for him continues to this day independent of his Santa Claus connection.

Nicholas rose to prominence among the saints because he was the patron of so many groups, ranging from sailors to entire nations. By about 1200, explained University of Manitoba historian Gerry Bowler, author of Santa Claus: A Biography, he became known as a patron of children and magical gift bringer because of two great stories from his life.

In the better-known tale, three young girls are saved from a life of prostitution when young Bishop Nicholas secretly delivers three bags of gold to their indebted father, which can be used for their dowries.
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news...-nicholas/
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