Welcome, Guest

 or  Register
NewsFeed

Our Galaxy's Central Black Hole Spit Out a GIANT FLASH of LIGHT
#21
Selfie
The Devil whispers “You’re not strong enough to withstand the storm.”

The warrior replies “I am the storm.”
PickleSnout  likes this!
Reply Share
#22
(08-13-2019, 10:10 PM)PickleSnout Wrote:
(08-13-2019, 10:03 PM)MaximalGravity Wrote:
(08-13-2019, 09:28 PM)PickleSnout Wrote: Interesting, suggesting a lensing effect for an occulted supernova.  Sure, why not.
Need more data!

It's most easily detected in a color (frequency) shift.

There's lots written on the subject by both Astronomers and Astrophysicists. A pal got his Doc in Astrophysics, and, i think he first told me about it years ago.

Too deep for me. If you figure it out, please explain it to me.

I get the mass/energy thing. And, i understand the concept and workings of Perturbation from Orbital Mechanics. But, when multi dimensions are in the mix, i move on to other stuff. Newton is my friend.

How does gravity alter the trajectory of light?
Asked by: ignotum4ever

Answer
According to Einstein's General Relativity Theory,light will be affected in the same way matter is affected by gravity. This is because under this theory, we should think of gravity not in terms of vector like forces, but as a consequence of the "shape" of the universe. From Newton's point of view, gravity was a linearly directed force with which all objects with mass pulled on all other objects with mass. His analysis showed that the strength of the force was proportional to the product of the 2 masses attracting one another, and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. Thus an apple and the earth would pull toward each other, and the apple "falls" from the tree. Since light (whether perceived as a ray or a photon) has no mass, Newton's equation predicts that it will not be attracted by gravity towards anything, no matter how massive. In order to construct a theoretical framework that would be consistent to all observers and that did not rely on some independent fixed reference frame, Einstein had to discard this perception of how gravity works and devise a new understanding. According to this theory, all object with mass alter the curvature of spacetime, the 4 dimensional fabric of the universe. Objects moving through spacetime then simply follow the curves that have been created. Since human brains are not good at picturing things in 4 dimensions we usually resort to an analogy in 3 dimensions. Imagine spacetime as a sheet of rubber, stretched flat when there is no matter present. If we place a massive object like a star in this "space" it pushes down into the rubber sheet creating a dimple or pit in the rubber. an asteroid flying by the star would not travel in a straight line as it rolled along the sheet, it would curve as it went through the dip, coming out in a new direction.
More
https://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae661.cfm

Spacetime (the physical structure) of the universe itself gets bent, so light goes in a line, but space is curved.

Prove it .

Chuckle Drinks
"We were in the jungle, there were too many of us, we had access to too much money, too much equipment, and little by little we went insane."

--Francis Ford Coppola
http://theseventies.berkeley.edu/godfath...amily-man/


oldcynic, PickleSnout  likes this!
Reply Share
#23
(08-13-2019, 10:13 PM)MaximalGravity Wrote:
(08-13-2019, 10:10 PM)PickleSnout Wrote:
(08-13-2019, 10:03 PM)MaximalGravity Wrote: It's most easily detected in a color (frequency) shift.

There's lots written on the subject by both Astronomers and Astrophysicists. A pal got his Doc in Astrophysics, and, i think he first told me about it years ago.

Too deep for me. If you figure it out, please explain it to me.

I get the mass/energy thing. And, i understand the concept and workings of Perturbation from Orbital Mechanics. But, when multi dimensions are in the mix, i move on to other stuff. Newton is my friend.

How does gravity alter the trajectory of light?
Asked by: ignotum4ever

Answer
According to Einstein's General Relativity Theory,light will be affected in the same way matter is affected by gravity. This is because under this theory, we should think of gravity not in terms of vector like forces, but as a consequence of the "shape" of the universe. From Newton's point of view, gravity was a linearly directed force with which all objects with mass pulled on all other objects with mass. His analysis showed that the strength of the force was proportional to the product of the 2 masses attracting one another, and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. Thus an apple and the earth would pull toward each other, and the apple "falls" from the tree. Since light (whether perceived as a ray or a photon) has no mass, Newton's equation predicts that it will not be attracted by gravity towards anything, no matter how massive. In order to construct a theoretical framework that would be consistent to all observers and that did not rely on some independent fixed reference frame, Einstein had to discard this perception of how gravity works and devise a new understanding. According to this theory, all object with mass alter the curvature of spacetime, the 4 dimensional fabric of the universe. Objects moving through spacetime then simply follow the curves that have been created. Since human brains are not good at picturing things in 4 dimensions we usually resort to an analogy in 3 dimensions. Imagine spacetime as a sheet of rubber, stretched flat when there is no matter present. If we place a massive object like a star in this "space" it pushes down into the rubber sheet creating a dimple or pit in the rubber. an asteroid flying by the star would not travel in a straight line as it rolled along the sheet, it would curve as it went through the dip, coming out in a new direction.
More
https://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae661.cfm

Spacetime (the physical structure) of the universe itself gets bent, so light goes in a line, but space is curved.

Prove it .

Chuckle    Drinks

Ham Facepalm Spockbrow Jptdknpa
Heartflowers
MaximalGravity, oldcynic  likes this!
Reply Share
#24
(08-13-2019, 10:13 PM)MaximalGravity Wrote:
(08-13-2019, 10:10 PM)PickleSnout Wrote:
(08-13-2019, 10:03 PM)MaximalGravity Wrote: It's most easily detected in a color (frequency) shift.

There's lots written on the subject by both Astronomers and Astrophysicists. A pal got his Doc in Astrophysics, and, i think he first told me about it years ago.

Too deep for me. If you figure it out, please explain it to me.

I get the mass/energy thing. And, i understand the concept and workings of Perturbation from Orbital Mechanics. But, when multi dimensions are in the mix, i move on to other stuff. Newton is my friend.

How does gravity alter the trajectory of light?
Asked by: ignotum4ever

Answer
According to Einstein's General Relativity Theory,light will be affected in the same way matter is affected by gravity. This is because under this theory, we should think of gravity not in terms of vector like forces, but as a consequence of the "shape" of the universe. From Newton's point of view, gravity was a linearly directed force with which all objects with mass pulled on all other objects with mass. His analysis showed that the strength of the force was proportional to the product of the 2 masses attracting one another, and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. Thus an apple and the earth would pull toward each other, and the apple "falls" from the tree. Since light (whether perceived as a ray or a photon) has no mass, Newton's equation predicts that it will not be attracted by gravity towards anything, no matter how massive. In order to construct a theoretical framework that would be consistent to all observers and that did not rely on some independent fixed reference frame, Einstein had to discard this perception of how gravity works and devise a new understanding. According to this theory, all object with mass alter the curvature of spacetime, the 4 dimensional fabric of the universe. Objects moving through spacetime then simply follow the curves that have been created. Since human brains are not good at picturing things in 4 dimensions we usually resort to an analogy in 3 dimensions. Imagine spacetime as a sheet of rubber, stretched flat when there is no matter present. If we place a massive object like a star in this "space" it pushes down into the rubber sheet creating a dimple or pit in the rubber. an asteroid flying by the star would not travel in a straight line as it rolled along the sheet, it would curve as it went through the dip, coming out in a new direction.
More
https://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae661.cfm

Spacetime (the physical structure) of the universe itself gets bent, so light goes in a line, but space is curved.

Prove it .

Notice the curves of this heavenly body

[Image: PfYrR7R.jpg]


...what was the question?
MaximalGravity, PickleSnout  likes this!
Reply Share
#25
They have released the Kracken
"One shitty decision away from disaster"
PickleSnout  likes this!
Reply Share