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Obelisk of Axum
#1
[Image: axum.jpg]





Considering the size of the Obelisk of Axum, it is truly amazing that it was transported between continents twice during the last 100 years. However, for many people in Ethiopia, the return of the massive stele was an important milestone in bolstering national pride and celebrating Ethiopia’s history.

From the early 4th century B.C.E until the 10th century C.E, the Kingdom of Axum was one of the greatest powers on earth. Centered as a trade city between Persia and Rome, the city of Axum flourished in culture, power and wealth. A pagan Kingdom during its early peak, giant pillars were erected to mark the tombs of important leaders.
In the 4th century, the King Ezana of Axum solidified the Kingdom’s conversion to Christianity, and stopped all pagan practices, including the erection of burial stelea such as the 80-foot Obelisk of Axum. Standing only until the 16th century, an earthquake likely toppled the obelisk, and without any importance in a Christian society it was left in multiple pieces to disintegrate back into sand.

Cite: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/aksum-obelisks

The Kingdom of Aksum or Axum, also known as the Aksumite Empire, was a trading nation in the area of Eritrea and northern Ethiopia , which existed from approximately 100 to 940 AD. It grew from the proto-Aksumite Iron Age period c. 4th century BC to achieve prominence by the 1st century AD, and was a major player in the commerce between the Roman Empire and Ancient India.

The main Obelisk of Axum (Amharic: የአክሱም ሐውልት?) is supposedly 1,700 years old, 24 meters tall (79-foot) is made of granite, and weighs 160 tonnes. It is ornamented with two false doors at the base and features decorations resembling windows on all sides. How could they have shaped hard granite that long ago, and on that scale?

The stelae were probably carved and erected during the 4th century A.D. by subjects of the Kingdom of Aksum, but the question remains how? With simple iron tools? Erection of stelae in Axum is stated as being a very old practice (today it is still possible to see primitive roughly carved stelae near more elaborated “obelisks”.) Is it possible that they are far older than presumed?

Cite and see some good pics and read more: https://hiddenincatours.com/the-amazing-...-ethiopia/
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#2
Incredible!!
 
sivil  likes this!
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#3
So many questions and so few answers.

What we get is mostly conjecture since the artifacts predate the memory of the present day inhabitants.
sivil  likes this!
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#4
(03-14-2019, 05:33 PM)SlowLoris Wrote: So many questions and so few answers.

What we get is mostly conjecture since the artifacts predate the memory of the present day inhabitants.

I know, its like we are a species with amnesia
Miscellaneous  likes this!
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