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LIVE STREAM TOMMY Sentenced 19 weeks in BELMARSH prison
#31
People are meeting at Belmarsh Prison tomorrow evening.



Liberate the power of love within and it is so powerful, it is a key to life.  It requires those that have already liberated their love to help others to do so. Being a liberator of love is wonderful when people appreciate the healing power of it. The authority of the divine key. https://lotusfeet22.blogspot.com
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#32
(07-12-2019, 01:07 PM)KOMMA Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 10:17 PM)Verity Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 08:47 PM)KOMMA Wrote: @Verity

Could you please provide us with a link on "Double Jeopardy", so that I can share it with others in the UK please.

Many thanks  

Heartflowers

@KOMMA Just looking at the Wiki piece on double jeopardy (that discusses
its consideration around the world), it looks like since 2003, re-trial i.e.
double jeopardy has been permitted in case(s) of murder:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_jeo..._and_Wales

United Kingdom
See also: Criminal Justice Act 2003
England and Wales
Double jeopardy has been permitted in England and Wales in certain (exceptional) circumstances since the Criminal Justice Act 2003.

Pre-2003
The doctrines of autrefois acquit and autrefois convict persisted as part of the common law from the time of the Norman conquest of England; they were regarded as essential elements for protection of the subject's liberty and respect for due process of law in that there should be finality of proceedings.[6] There were only three exceptions, all relatively recent, to the rules:

The prosecution has a right of appeal against acquittal in summary cases if the decision appears to be wrong in law or in excess of jurisdiction.[28]
A retrial is permissible if the interests of justice so require, following appeal against conviction by a defendant.[29]
A "tainted acquittal", where there has been an offence of interference with, or intimidation of, a juror or witness, can be challenged in the High Court.[30]
In Connelly v DPP [1964] AC 1254, the Law Lords ruled that a defendant could not be tried for any offence arising out of substantially the same set of facts relied upon in a previous charge of which he had been acquitted, unless there are "special circumstances" proven by the prosecution. There is little case law on the meaning of "special circumstances", but it has been suggested that the emergence of new evidence would suffice.[31]

A defendant who had been convicted of an offence could be given a second trial for an aggravated form of that offence if the facts constituting the aggravation were discovered after the first conviction.[32] By contrast, a person who had been acquitted of a lesser offence could not be tried for an aggravated form even if new evidence became available.[33]

Post-2003
Following the murder of Stephen Lawrence, the Macpherson Report recommended that the double jeopardy rule should be abrogated in murder cases, and that it should be possible to subject an acquitted murder suspect to a second trial if "fresh and viable" new evidence later came to light. The Law Commission later added its support to this in its report "Double Jeopardy and Prosecution Appeals" (2001). A parallel report into the criminal justice system by Lord Justice Auld, a past Senior Presiding Judge for England and Wales, had also commenced in 1999 and was published as the Auld Report six months after the Law Commission report. It opined that the Law Commission had been unduly cautious by limiting the scope to murder and that "the exceptions should [...] extend to other grave offences punishable with life and/or long terms of imprisonment as Parliament might specify."[34]

Both Jack Straw (then Home Secretary) and William Hague (then Leader of the Opposition) favoured this measure.[35] These recommendations were implemented—not uncontroversially at the time—within the Criminal Justice Act 2003,[36][37] and this provision came into force in April 2005.[38] It opened certain serious crimes (including murder, manslaughter, kidnapping, rape, armed robbery, and serious drug crimes) to a retrial, regardless of when committed, with two conditions: the retrial must be approved by the Director of Public Prosecutions, and the Court of Appeal must agree to quash the original acquittal due to "new and compelling evidence".[39] Pressure by Ann Ming, the mother of 1989 murder victim Julie Hogg—whose killer, William Dunlop, was initially acquitted in 1991 and subsequently confessed—also contributed to the demand for legal change.[40][41]

On 11 September 2006, Dunlop became the first person to be convicted of murder following a prior acquittal for the same crime, in his case his 1991 acquittal of Julie Hogg's murder. Some years later he had confessed to the crime, and was convicted of perjury, but was unable to be retried for the killing itself. The case was re-investigated in early 2005, when the new law came into effect, and his case was referred to the Court of Appeal in November 2005 for permission for a new trial, which was granted.[41][42][43] Dunlop pleaded guilty to murdering Julie Hogg and was sentenced to life imprisonment, with a recommendation he serve no less than 17 years.[44]

On 13 December 2010, Mark Weston became the first person to be retried and found guilty of murder by a jury (Dunlop having confessed). In 1996 Weston had been acquitted of the murder of Vikki Thompson at Ascott-under-Wychwood on 12 August 1995, but following the discovery in 2009 of compelling new evidence (Thompson's blood on Weston's boots) he was arrested and tried for a second time. He was sentenced to life imprisonment, to serve a minimum of 13 years.[45]

Thank you, do you have an American link as I was interested in the American view of it in regards to your laws.

Heartflowers

Welcome, Komma. On the same wiki page is included info for
double jeopardy in the U.S. and around the world, including
the U.S.:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_jeopardy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_jeo...ted_States

A few more links:

https://criminal.findlaw.com/criminal-ri...pardy.html

https://criminal.findlaw.com/criminal-ri...round.html

https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-double...dy-4164747
That's My King! (Dr. S.M. Lockridge, Official) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzqTFNfeDnE  Heartflowers
Dr Evil, KOMMA  likes this!
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#33
This is a great interview.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBD9gBuPoDI
KOMMA  likes this!
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#34
Given Travistock is MK Central, how come the UK has allowed Tommy to become who he has become and why is it publicly treating him in a palpably unjust manner?

@KOMMA - does this Tommy move tie into the leadership change or is it a vestige of the old regime? And if the latter, will the new regime correct it?
Live without fear.
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#35
(07-13-2019, 07:15 AM)Dr Evil Wrote: Given Travistock is MK Central, how come the UK has allowed Tommy to become who he has become and why is it publicly treating him in a palpably unjust manner?

@KOMMA - does this Tommy move tie into the leadership change or is it a vestige of the old regime? And if the latter, will the new regime correct it?

They sent Tommy to the same prison as Julian Assange that says a lot about the state, the judiciary, a female judge said that she was making an example of Tommy. It is bizarre to me that he wasn't allowed to have a jury, how can the state justify that? How can they justify bringing more and additional charges after he won the case on appeal and was released from prison? Clearly it is to try to deter other people speaking up, it's more "project fear" and "scare tactics". Although it is far too late as so many of us have been speaking up for decades.

There is no leadership change at this point in time, its more of the old boy network that Lord Pearson and Gerard Batten have been challenging, another reason why the MSM have been giving Gerard such a hard time of it.

We've got another eclipse on the 16th and that's on the "Day of Rising Tide", so it don't bode well for the aristocrats that stand against the people for the people are arising.

The AG is appointed by Elizabeth, they should be storming outside Buckingham Palace, Elizabeth never did like it when a person is more popular than she is in England.
Liberate the power of love within and it is so powerful, it is a key to life.  It requires those that have already liberated their love to help others to do so. Being a liberator of love is wonderful when people appreciate the healing power of it. The authority of the divine key. https://lotusfeet22.blogspot.com
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#36
(07-12-2019, 10:07 PM)Verity Wrote:
(07-12-2019, 01:07 PM)KOMMA Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 10:17 PM)Verity Wrote: @KOMMA Just looking at the Wiki piece on double jeopardy (that discusses
its consideration around the world), it looks like since 2003, re-trial i.e.
double jeopardy has been permitted in case(s) of murder:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_jeo..._and_Wales

United Kingdom
See also: Criminal Justice Act 2003
England and Wales
Double jeopardy has been permitted in England and Wales in certain (exceptional) circumstances since the Criminal Justice Act 2003.

Pre-2003
The doctrines of autrefois acquit and autrefois convict persisted as part of the common law from the time of the Norman conquest of England; they were regarded as essential elements for protection of the subject's liberty and respect for due process of law in that there should be finality of proceedings.[6] There were only three exceptions, all relatively recent, to the rules:

The prosecution has a right of appeal against acquittal in summary cases if the decision appears to be wrong in law or in excess of jurisdiction.[28]
A retrial is permissible if the interests of justice so require, following appeal against conviction by a defendant.[29]
A "tainted acquittal", where there has been an offence of interference with, or intimidation of, a juror or witness, can be challenged in the High Court.[30]
In Connelly v DPP [1964] AC 1254, the Law Lords ruled that a defendant could not be tried for any offence arising out of substantially the same set of facts relied upon in a previous charge of which he had been acquitted, unless there are "special circumstances" proven by the prosecution. There is little case law on the meaning of "special circumstances", but it has been suggested that the emergence of new evidence would suffice.[31]

A defendant who had been convicted of an offence could be given a second trial for an aggravated form of that offence if the facts constituting the aggravation were discovered after the first conviction.[32] By contrast, a person who had been acquitted of a lesser offence could not be tried for an aggravated form even if new evidence became available.[33]

Post-2003
Following the murder of Stephen Lawrence, the Macpherson Report recommended that the double jeopardy rule should be abrogated in murder cases, and that it should be possible to subject an acquitted murder suspect to a second trial if "fresh and viable" new evidence later came to light. The Law Commission later added its support to this in its report "Double Jeopardy and Prosecution Appeals" (2001). A parallel report into the criminal justice system by Lord Justice Auld, a past Senior Presiding Judge for England and Wales, had also commenced in 1999 and was published as the Auld Report six months after the Law Commission report. It opined that the Law Commission had been unduly cautious by limiting the scope to murder and that "the exceptions should [...] extend to other grave offences punishable with life and/or long terms of imprisonment as Parliament might specify."[34]

Both Jack Straw (then Home Secretary) and William Hague (then Leader of the Opposition) favoured this measure.[35] These recommendations were implemented—not uncontroversially at the time—within the Criminal Justice Act 2003,[36][37] and this provision came into force in April 2005.[38] It opened certain serious crimes (including murder, manslaughter, kidnapping, rape, armed robbery, and serious drug crimes) to a retrial, regardless of when committed, with two conditions: the retrial must be approved by the Director of Public Prosecutions, and the Court of Appeal must agree to quash the original acquittal due to "new and compelling evidence".[39] Pressure by Ann Ming, the mother of 1989 murder victim Julie Hogg—whose killer, William Dunlop, was initially acquitted in 1991 and subsequently confessed—also contributed to the demand for legal change.[40][41]

On 11 September 2006, Dunlop became the first person to be convicted of murder following a prior acquittal for the same crime, in his case his 1991 acquittal of Julie Hogg's murder. Some years later he had confessed to the crime, and was convicted of perjury, but was unable to be retried for the killing itself. The case was re-investigated in early 2005, when the new law came into effect, and his case was referred to the Court of Appeal in November 2005 for permission for a new trial, which was granted.[41][42][43] Dunlop pleaded guilty to murdering Julie Hogg and was sentenced to life imprisonment, with a recommendation he serve no less than 17 years.[44]

On 13 December 2010, Mark Weston became the first person to be retried and found guilty of murder by a jury (Dunlop having confessed). In 1996 Weston had been acquitted of the murder of Vikki Thompson at Ascott-under-Wychwood on 12 August 1995, but following the discovery in 2009 of compelling new evidence (Thompson's blood on Weston's boots) he was arrested and tried for a second time. He was sentenced to life imprisonment, to serve a minimum of 13 years.[45]

Thank you, do you have an American link as I was interested in the American view of it in regards to your laws.

Heartflowers

Welcome, Komma. On the same wiki page is included info for
double jeopardy in the U.S. and around the world, including
the U.S.:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_jeopardy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_jeo...ted_States

A few more links:

https://criminal.findlaw.com/criminal-ri...pardy.html

https://criminal.findlaw.com/criminal-ri...round.html

https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-double...dy-4164747

Brilliant thank you.

Heartflowers Cheer Kiss
Liberate the power of love within and it is so powerful, it is a key to life.  It requires those that have already liberated their love to help others to do so. Being a liberator of love is wonderful when people appreciate the healing power of it. The authority of the divine key. https://lotusfeet22.blogspot.com
Verity  likes this!
Reply Share
#37
One of our truckers, they're trying to wear us down.

How pissed off are you?



Liberate the power of love within and it is so powerful, it is a key to life.  It requires those that have already liberated their love to help others to do so. Being a liberator of love is wonderful when people appreciate the healing power of it. The authority of the divine key. https://lotusfeet22.blogspot.com
Reply Share
#38
(07-13-2019, 09:58 AM)KOMMA Wrote:
(07-12-2019, 10:07 PM)Verity Wrote:
(07-12-2019, 01:07 PM)KOMMA Wrote: Thank you, do you have an American link as I was interested in the American view of it in regards to your laws.

Heartflowers

Welcome, Komma. On the same wiki page is included info for
double jeopardy in the U.S. and around the world, including
the U.S.:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_jeopardy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_jeo...ted_States

A few more links:

https://criminal.findlaw.com/criminal-ri...pardy.html

https://criminal.findlaw.com/criminal-ri...round.html

https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-double...dy-4164747

Brilliant thank you.

Heartflowers  Cheer  Kiss

No trouble at all, hope it helps! Hugs Heartflowers
That's My King! (Dr. S.M. Lockridge, Official) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzqTFNfeDnE  Heartflowers
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