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Gardening and Food Growing Thread


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Weather men are saying hot weather next week. We could certainly do with it in the UK.
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My large chili plant has got sticky leaves on the lower levels of it, it looks a mite has been at it. Eyeroll
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(06-16-2018, 08:21 AM)Guest Wrote: My large chili plant has got sticky leaves on the lower levels of it, it looks a mite has been at it.  Eyeroll

Identify and cure.

https://www.worldofchillies.com/growing_...pests.html
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Zucchini and yellow leaves.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/...cchini.htm
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Has anybody here eaten Mallow?

I'm a little late gettin the okra going, but my garden has buttloads of mallow which came with the horse manure I put down three years ago.

It's real easy to weed, but I let it grow every year and reseed itsself because it has broad leaves and shelters some of my other plants from the heat.

It's supposed to be high in mucilage, like Okra, prickly pear, and aloe, and I'm wanting to add a lot of that to my diet because it provides a nice environment in the gut for healthy microbiome.

OSU extension Office identified the plant for me as a type of mallow, but I can't find a picture that quite matches mine on Google images.

I'm certain it is a mallow, and if I eat any of it I'll start with a very small amount, but curious if anybody else eats it?

A few months ago I borrowed a boxed set of:

https://www.pbs.org/show/michael-woods-story-england/

Quote:In this groundbreaking series, Michael Wood tells the story of one place – the village of Kibworth, Leicestershire – throughout the whole of English history. Located in the very heart of England, Kibworth has lived through the Black Death, the Civil War and the Industrial Revolution and was even bombed in World War II.

During one of the episodes they examined the diets of peasants in this village and one of the plants they depended on as a mainstay in their gardem plots was mallow.

Supposed to be a good soup thickener like Okra.(The stems) and the leaves, seeds, and roots are edible too.

I think the seeds were used in the horse feed.(Came to me as horse poop, but hey....Chuckle)

Anybody eaten any?

Chuckle

If you can eat as much as you want with no ill effects the productivity of my garden just tripled in the last month.

Lmao
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[Image: serveimage?url=https%3A%2F%2Fhonest-food...106e57ba78]

Going Mediterranean Cuisine are We ?

.
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(06-16-2018, 12:35 PM)Heir Wrote: [Image: serveimage?url=https%3A%2F%2Fhonest-food...106e57ba78]

Going Mediterranean Cuisine are We ?

.

Odd you should mention that...I just printed a recipe for falafel and going to experiment "tamale-ing" it in spinach, kale and grape leaves.

BTW my three year old muscadine grape cutting now has fruit on the vine!

And the root I dug up from Grandpa's garden has reached the fence, should fruit next year.

(I had to plant them 18" from the fence because of dog-proofing, and train them onto it)
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(06-16-2018, 12:35 PM)Heir Wrote: [Image: serveimage?url=https%3A%2F%2Fhonest-food...106e57ba78]

Going Mediterranean Cuisine are We ?

.

I do like stuffed vine leaves actually, haven't made those for decades.

I've been off food for nearly a week, have to make something interesting to eat. All have had for two days is cream cheese sandwich. The day before that I had a little pasta.

I washed all the sills and windows to get rid of the mites, and they're bloody back again. So I took the mites off my seedlings, and I sprayed it all with cider vinegar in water. I hope they and the Pak Choi can survive that.

The big chili plant and new zuchini I've put outside in the miniature greenhouse, after cleaning the stems and branches and leaves. Hopefully being outside will help them, because apparently those 'mites" like the heat of indoors.

I didn't have "mites" last year.
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(06-16-2018, 12:04 PM)Luvapottamus Wrote: Has anybody here eaten Mallow?

I'm a little late gettin the okra going, but my garden has buttloads of mallow which came with the horse manure I put down three years ago.

It's real easy to weed, but I let it grow every year and reseed itsself because it has broad leaves and shelters some of my other plants from the heat.

It's supposed to be high in mucilage, like Okra, prickly pear, and aloe, and I'm wanting to add a lot of that to my diet because it provides a nice environment in the gut for healthy microbiome.

OSU extension Office identified the plant for me as a type of mallow, but I can't find a picture that quite matches mine on Google images.

I'm certain it is a mallow, and if I eat any of it I'll start with a very small amount, but curious if anybody else eats it?

A few months ago I borrowed a boxed set of:

https://www.pbs.org/show/michael-woods-story-england/

Quote:In this groundbreaking series, Michael Wood tells the story of one place – the village of Kibworth, Leicestershire – throughout the whole of English history. Located in the very heart of England, Kibworth has lived through the Black Death, the Civil War and the Industrial Revolution and was even bombed in World War II.

During one of the episodes they examined the diets of peasants in this village and one of the plants they depended on as a mainstay in their gardem plots was mallow.

Supposed to be a good soup thickener like Okra.(The stems) and the leaves, seeds, and roots are edible too.

I think the seeds were used in the horse feed.(Came to me as horse poop, but hey....Chuckle)

Anybody eaten any?

Chuckle

If you can eat as much as you want with no ill effects the productivity of my garden just tripled in the last month.

Lmao

Not that I'm aware of Luv, although it sounds interesting.

You growing any beetroot Luv, they grow good in our English weather, and so does the celery.

Heartflowers
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