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Fish Oil
#1





There are two major types of omega-3 fatty acids in our diets. One type is alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and the other type is eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The body partially converts ALA to EPA and DHA.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), fish oil (EPA and DHA) is the most commonly used dietary supplement in the United States. A study published in the Annals of Rheumatic Disease in 2013, found that when a high-dose fish oil supplement is added to so-called triple therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (methotrexate, sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine), patients achieved better outcomes: they were far less likely to “fail” treatment and twice as likely to reach remission than those who did not take a supplement.

According to the results of at least 13 studies involving more than 500 participants, people with rheumatoid arthritis who took omega-3s supplements had a reduction in joint pain – but not in joint damage. Other studies suggest that omega-3s may help RA patients lower their dose of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). And according to information from NIH, administering fish oil by IV reduces swollen and tender joints in people with RA.

[Image: Fish-oil-can-reduce-Rheumatoid-Arthritis.jpg]

Until somewhat recently, no one really knew what made omega-3s so beneficial. Researchers, however, believe they have uncovered the secret of omega-3 fatty acids. A study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston revealed that omega-3s actually convert into compounds that are 10,000 times more powerful than original fatty acids. So what does this mean to us? These compounds include resolvins, which help bring an inflammatory response in the body to an end, says the study’s lead researcher, Charles Serhan, PhD, director, Center for Experimental Therapeutics and Reperfusion Injury at Harvard Medical School, Boston.

In a healthy immune system, the normal inflammatory process repairs damage and protects the body from infections. But in inflammatory types of arthritis and related diseases, an overactive immune response leads to tissue destruction. Serhan’s research showed that the same pathway that signals the start of inflammation also includes an off switch. Omega-3s convert into these more powerful compounds, putting the brakes on this active process and causing it to screech to a halt, says Serhan. What is not yet known is how much omega-3s are needed to optimize the body’s conversion from omega-3s into resolvins, says Serhan.





http://blog.arthritis.org/living-with-ar...arthritis/

How much fish oil should you take? What kind of fish oil? Are certain brands better than others? In watching a documentary several years ago on Alaskan Eskimos (I was watching because of my long-time interest in Alaskan Malumute dogs) I couldn’t help but notice their meals. In particular, not only were they mostly fish, but they also used a fish oil mixture made from whale blubber almost like salt. It was literally sprinkled on almost everything they ate. I started to wonder at that point, are we taking too little fish oil? Much of this research on fish oil began in the 1970-80’s with Dyerberg’s group studying Eskimos in Greenland and comparing them to Danes. Basically, despite the Eskimos being quite fat, their blood work was better than Danish men and women, and they had far fewer episodes of fatal heart attacks. Other research since has also shown that fish oil consumption among Eskimo tribes has been linked to reduced heart disease and metabolic syndrome. One recent study found that high levels of EPA and DHA in Eskimos was associated with good blood markers like lower triglycerides and lower c-reactive protein (a test for bad inflammation).

Eskimos also seem to have less arthritis. The story on arthritis and fish oil began in the late 1970’s when a study was published that showed that Eskimo women (despite being quite heavy) had less knee arthritis. So if Eskimos have less arthritis, how would fish oil help?

[Image: animal-kingdom-fishes-cats-cat_owners-ca...69_low.jpg]

Fish oils suppress the formation of inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids and this is believed to be associated with less pain and inflammation. However, rather than shutting down the COX inflammatory pathway (like NSAID drugs-so called “COX inhibitors”) they are metabolized by that pathway into powerful anti-inflammatory molecules known as the resolvins and the protectins. These have been shown to have many effects, not the least of which is activating the the recovery process of inflammation. So unlike NSAID’s (Motrin, Alleve, Ibuprofen, Voltaren, Celebrex) which block an important inflammation pathway and cause sudden death via heart attacks and fatal stomach ulcers, fish oil increases good molecules that can control inflammation. They also do more than just turn down the inflammation knob,  they switch inflammation from a bad chronic state to a good recovery state. That last inflammation recovery function likely needs a little explanation. Inflammation is good as it’s the body’s process to allow repair. Treatments like prolotherapy increase acute inflammation to allow tissue repair. However, acute inflammation from an ankle sprain is to be distinguished from it’s evil twin brother-chronic inflammation. This is the kind of inflammation that leads to heart attacks and other chronic diseases and is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome (overweight, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, pre-diabetes). So the fish oil effect that leads to molecules that move inflammation toward recovery phase means that chronic inflammation (which never gets to that recovery phase) gets moved toward something that looks more like helpful acute inflammation (which has a recovery phase). To use another analogy, chronic inflammation is like trying to bake a cake in a 200 degree oven. The oven isn’t hot enough to trigger the chemical processes that “bake” the cake-so all you get is mush. This is like chronic inflammation. However, turn the heat up to 400 degrees, and you get a “baked” cake (this is like acute inflammation). So increasing the recovery phase of inflammation is like turning the heat up in the oven.

Which components of fish oil help arthritis? There are a number of different component fatty acids that have been studied, the best known of which are DHA, EPA, and AA. EPA has been shown in a recent study to block the bad chemicals that lead to cartilage degeneration. DHA also has the same, but lesser effect.  Another lab study also found that EPA was better than DHA or AA in reducing bad cartilage breakdown chemicals. Finally, a third recent study concluded the same thing (EPA>DHA). DHA was also strongly associated with modulating pain. It up regulates “feel good” endorphins much more strongly than other types of unsaturated fat (in this case olive oil).

https://www.regenexx.com/how-much-fish-o...tem-cells/

What does the FDA say about Fish Oil Dosage?

The FDA says it is safe to take up to 3000 mg of Omega-3 per day.

BUT!

3000 mg of Omega-3 is not the same as 3000 mg of Fish Oil.
If your bottle of fish oil says ‘1000 mg Fish Oil,’ that is the volume of fish oil per pill. That is NOT the amount of Omega-3 in that pill. A 1000 mg pill typically has only 300 mg of Omega-3.

If you take fish oil that you bought at the drug or grocery store, you will need to take 10 pills to get 3000 mg of Omega-3.

Are you taking 10 pills a day? Probably not! So no need to worry.

[Image: Rheumatoid-Arthritis-Joint.png]

A dosage of 10 pills is simply unreasonable! And will probably cause side effects like bloating, gas and excessive burping. With a Pharmaceutical Grade Fish Oil like OmegaVia, you can get 3000 mg of Omega-3 with just 3 pills.

What to Expect if you Take too much Fish Oil?

You should expect minor, harmless side effects like:

Fishy burps
Bloated feeling
Indigestion
Unpleasant taste in mouth
If you develop a rash, you may be allergic to fish. If you notice difficulty breathing, hives, swelling of tongue, lips or throat, get emergency medical help at once. These are signs of allergy. You may be having an allergic reaction to fish oil or something else that you just ate. It could be a dangerous condition. Go to your doctor right away.

But for most people, the side effects of fish oil are from taking low-quality products.

Is there a Risk of Bleeding?

Smart people in lab coats argue about this.  The risk is theoretical. Even if you take super high doses (10 pills or more) of fish oil, new research shows that bleeding time is not prolonged. Here is a scientific explanation from the smart folks at Purdue University.

Inuits don’t die from paper cuts

For what it’s worth, the average Inuit person in Greenland eats about 13,000 mg of Omega-3 per day.  That’s the same as taking 43 Walmart-brand fish oil pills every day.  Or about 13 OmegaVia pills. And they are doing fine.  Matter of fact, they are better than fine.  The elders who still mostly eat traditional high-fat foods made from marine mammals and fish have lower heart disease rates than we do.  And they’re all not bleeding to death after getting paper cuts.

https://omegavia.com/fish-oil-dosage-how...-fish-oil/

-So I started taking the fish oil in addition to shark cartilage extract, the shark was pretty good but the oil has helped me a lot, I can tell -T
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#2
(09-30-2017, 11:14 AM)titanic1 Wrote:




There are two major types of omega-3 fatty acids in our diets. One type is alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and the other type is eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The body partially converts ALA to EPA and DHA.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), fish oil (EPA and DHA) is the most commonly used dietary supplement in the United States. A study published in the Annals of Rheumatic Disease in 2013, found that when a high-dose fish oil supplement is added to so-called triple therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (methotrexate, sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine), patients achieved better outcomes: they were far less likely to “fail” treatment and twice as likely to reach remission than those who did not take a supplement.

According to the results of at least 13 studies involving more than 500 participants, people with rheumatoid arthritis who took omega-3s supplements had a reduction in joint pain – but not in joint damage. Other studies suggest that omega-3s may help RA patients lower their dose of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). And according to information from NIH, administering fish oil by IV reduces swollen and tender joints in people with RA.

[Image: Fish-oil-can-reduce-Rheumatoid-Arthritis.jpg]

Until somewhat recently, no one really knew what made omega-3s so beneficial. Researchers, however, believe they have uncovered the secret of omega-3 fatty acids. A study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston revealed that omega-3s actually convert into compounds that are 10,000 times more powerful than original fatty acids. So what does this mean to us? These compounds include resolvins, which help bring an inflammatory response in the body to an end, says the study’s lead researcher, Charles Serhan, PhD, director, Center for Experimental Therapeutics and Reperfusion Injury at Harvard Medical School, Boston.

In a healthy immune system, the normal inflammatory process repairs damage and protects the body from infections. But in inflammatory types of arthritis and related diseases, an overactive immune response leads to tissue destruction. Serhan’s research showed that the same pathway that signals the start of inflammation also includes an off switch. Omega-3s convert into these more powerful compounds, putting the brakes on this active process and causing it to screech to a halt, says Serhan. What is not yet known is how much omega-3s are needed to optimize the body’s conversion from omega-3s into resolvins, says Serhan.





http://blog.arthritis.org/living-with-ar...arthritis/

How much fish oil should you take? What kind of fish oil? Are certain brands better than others? In watching a documentary several years ago on Alaskan Eskimos (I was watching because of my long-time interest in Alaskan Malumute dogs) I couldn’t help but notice their meals. In particular, not only were they mostly fish, but they also used a fish oil mixture made from whale blubber almost like salt. It was literally sprinkled on almost everything they ate. I started to wonder at that point, are we taking too little fish oil? Much of this research on fish oil began in the 1970-80’s with Dyerberg’s group studying Eskimos in Greenland and comparing them to Danes. Basically, despite the Eskimos being quite fat, their blood work was better than Danish men and women, and they had far fewer episodes of fatal heart attacks. Other research since has also shown that fish oil consumption among Eskimo tribes has been linked to reduced heart disease and metabolic syndrome. One recent study found that high levels of EPA and DHA in Eskimos was associated with good blood markers like lower triglycerides and lower c-reactive protein (a test for bad inflammation).

Eskimos also seem to have less arthritis. The story on arthritis and fish oil began in the late 1970’s when a study was published that showed that Eskimo women (despite being quite heavy) had less knee arthritis. So if Eskimos have less arthritis, how would fish oil help?

[Image: animal-kingdom-fishes-cats-cat_owners-ca...69_low.jpg]

Fish oils suppress the formation of inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids and this is believed to be associated with less pain and inflammation. However, rather than shutting down the COX inflammatory pathway (like NSAID drugs-so called “COX inhibitors”) they are metabolized by that pathway into powerful anti-inflammatory molecules known as the resolvins and the protectins. These have been shown to have many effects, not the least of which is activating the the recovery process of inflammation. So unlike NSAID’s (Motrin, Alleve, Ibuprofen, Voltaren, Celebrex) which block an important inflammation pathway and cause sudden death via heart attacks and fatal stomach ulcers, fish oil increases good molecules that can control inflammation. They also do more than just turn down the inflammation knob,  they switch inflammation from a bad chronic state to a good recovery state. That last inflammation recovery function likely needs a little explanation. Inflammation is good as it’s the body’s process to allow repair. Treatments like prolotherapy increase acute inflammation to allow tissue repair. However, acute inflammation from an ankle sprain is to be distinguished from it’s evil twin brother-chronic inflammation. This is the kind of inflammation that leads to heart attacks and other chronic diseases and is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome (overweight, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, pre-diabetes). So the fish oil effect that leads to molecules that move inflammation toward recovery phase means that chronic inflammation (which never gets to that recovery phase) gets moved toward something that looks more like helpful acute inflammation (which has a recovery phase). To use another analogy, chronic inflammation is like trying to bake a cake in a 200 degree oven. The oven isn’t hot enough to trigger the chemical processes that “bake” the cake-so all you get is mush. This is like chronic inflammation. However, turn the heat up to 400 degrees, and you get a “baked” cake (this is like acute inflammation). So increasing the recovery phase of inflammation is like turning the heat up in the oven.

Which components of fish oil help arthritis? There are a number of different component fatty acids that have been studied, the best known of which are DHA, EPA, and AA. EPA has been shown in a recent study to block the bad chemicals that lead to cartilage degeneration. DHA also has the same, but lesser effect.  Another lab study also found that EPA was better than DHA or AA in reducing bad cartilage breakdown chemicals. Finally, a third recent study concluded the same thing (EPA>DHA). DHA was also strongly associated with modulating pain. It up regulates “feel good” endorphins much more strongly than other types of unsaturated fat (in this case olive oil).

https://www.regenexx.com/how-much-fish-o...tem-cells/

What does the FDA say about Fish Oil Dosage?

The FDA says it is safe to take up to 3000 mg of Omega-3 per day.

BUT!

3000 mg of Omega-3 is not the same as 3000 mg of Fish Oil.
If your bottle of fish oil says ‘1000 mg Fish Oil,’ that is the volume of fish oil per pill. That is NOT the amount of Omega-3 in that pill. A 1000 mg pill typically has only 300 mg of Omega-3.

If you take fish oil that you bought at the drug or grocery store, you will need to take 10 pills to get 3000 mg of Omega-3.

Are you taking 10 pills a day? Probably not! So no need to worry.

[Image: Rheumatoid-Arthritis-Joint.png]

A dosage of 10 pills is simply unreasonable! And will probably cause side effects like bloating, gas and excessive burping. With a Pharmaceutical Grade Fish Oil like OmegaVia, you can get 3000 mg of Omega-3 with just 3 pills.

What to Expect if you Take too much Fish Oil?

You should expect minor, harmless side effects like:

Fishy burps
Bloated feeling
Indigestion
Unpleasant taste in mouth
If you develop a rash, you may be allergic to fish. If you notice difficulty breathing, hives, swelling of tongue, lips or throat, get emergency medical help at once. These are signs of allergy. You may be having an allergic reaction to fish oil or something else that you just ate. It could be a dangerous condition. Go to your doctor right away.

But for most people, the side effects of fish oil are from taking low-quality products.

Is there a Risk of Bleeding?

Smart people in lab coats argue about this.  The risk is theoretical. Even if you take super high doses (10 pills or more) of fish oil, new research shows that bleeding time is not prolonged. Here is a scientific explanation from the smart folks at Purdue University.

Inuits don’t die from paper cuts

For what it’s worth, the average Inuit person in Greenland eats about 13,000 mg of Omega-3 per day.  That’s the same as taking 43 Walmart-brand fish oil pills every day.  Or about 13 OmegaVia pills. And they are doing fine.  Matter of fact, they are better than fine.  The elders who still mostly eat traditional high-fat foods made from marine mammals and fish have lower heart disease rates than we do.  And they’re all not bleeding to death after getting paper cuts.

https://omegavia.com/fish-oil-dosage-how...-fish-oil/

-So I started taking the fish oil in addition to shark cartilage extract, the shark was pretty good but the oil has helped me a lot, I can tell -T

Fish is very important, not just for Omega 3's, but some fish also has manganese too.

Heartflowers
Liberate the power of love within and it is so powerful, it is a key to life.  It requires those that have already liberated their love to help others to do so. Being a liberator of love is wonderful when people appreciate the healing power of it. The authority of the divine key. https://lotusfeet22.blogspot.com
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#3
i used to consume fish oil. but i soon intergrated a lot of raw seeds like chia, hemp and flaxseeds into my salad mix and cereals...bursting with omega goodness.
[Image: tradizional-demo.regular.png]

Just to be clear: I may or may not support the articles that i post here
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#4
There are healthier alternatives.
The oceans are in a bad way at the moment.       Angry        
So much waste in the fishing industry.  
I refuse to support it.      
It's all good. Heartflowers
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#5
I use fish oil and or flax seed oil for all my puppies ! If you ever have a dog with seizures that's what I recommend ! If you look at puppy chow Alpha Lipoic Acid is an added ingredient ! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpCi93hljXs
1 of 7000 Reserved
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#6
A friend grows Arctic Char in tanks in a barn, recycles all the water and uses the fish poop to grow plants in trays and in gardens ... the system is very sustainable and the food is great ... the Arctic Char are a very healthy high omega 3 fish choice ... plus they are awesome smoke cured
Cheers
______________
“I was gratified to be able to answer promptly, and I did. I said I didn’t know.”
― Mark Twain

“Reach deep into your wallet and buy a decent mule.”
― Robert Fitterman, War, the musical
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#7
So many great threads on the Fringe!  I don't subscribe to to many Titanic threads, 'cause I know I can just click on his username and find a treasure trove of a thread history.

Wish I had more time to get more in depth into many of the great thread topics around here.  If nothing else, they're great idea-flashes for a subject or discussion point that I can hopefully try and come around to later.

Thanks for all the effort, everyone  Yeah3

I take fish oil after getting it prescribed for a thyroid deficiency  1dunno1   Not sure of its efficacy, but I apprecjate the information on it!

[Image: 40125c4180bf76d1a03e3c0336f6a1afdd7119b8...c198fa.jpg]
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#8
My youngest son discovered a few years ago that fish oil was the remedy for his migraine headaches, which he had been battling for many years.

And I'm talking about the severe, debilitating kind of migraines, the ones that take you to your knees.

Heartflowers
  “Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful. And kindle in them the fire of your love. Send forth Your Spirit and they shall be created. And you will renew the face of the earth.”  

Heavenly Father, please keep President Donald J. Trump and his family safe and protected, along with all the Patriots who are working with him and for him. Protect and Nurture our Nation and help us through these turbulent times. We ask this in the Name of Christ  Amen
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#9
thunbsup 
My grandmother used cod liver oil as a punishment. Whenever we acted up she would feed us a teaspoon of it.  In her words I was a mean little donkey. I must have been a healthy little donkey, too. Wink

I think of her every time I pop a fish oil capsule in my mouth along with the other vitamins and minerals.
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