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CORN...No one knows where it came from.
#1
lightning 
Short answer.. WE DO NOT KNOW.

[Their best theory]

Tracking the Ancestry of Corn Back 9,000 Years:

Quote:Despite its abundance and importance, the biological origin of maize has been a long-running mystery. The bright yellow, mouth-watering treat we know so well does not grow in the wild anywhere on the planet, so its ancestry was not at all obvious. (snip)

The greatest surprise, and the source of much past controversy in corn archeology, was the identification of the ancestor of maize. Many botanists did not see any connection between maize and other living plants. Some concluded that the crop plant arose through the domestication by early agriculturalists of a wild maize that was now extinct, or at least undiscovered.(snip)


I go round-and-round with folks about the origins of this life giving plant. In fact, a plant that has done more to feed the worlds population (before Monsanto) than anything except maybe rice (which also has a mysterious history)

Quote:However, a few scientists working during the first part of the 20th century uncovered evidence that they believed linked maize to what, at first glance, would seem to be a very unlikely parent, a Mexican grass called teosinte. (snip)

[Image: 25creatures-1-articleInline.jpg]

Quote:The differences between the two plants appeared to many scientists to be too great to have evolved in just a few thousand years of domestication. (snip)

Furthermore, by calculating the genetic distance between modern maize and Balsas teosinte, they estimated that domestication occurred about 9,000 years ago.

The most impressive aspect of the maize story is what it tells us about the capabilities of agriculturalists 9,000 years ago. These people were living in small groups and shifting their settlements seasonally. Yet they were able to transform a grass with many inconvenient, unwanted features into a high-yielding, easily harvested food crop. The domestication process must have occurred in many stages over a considerable length of time(snip)

The most crucial step was freeing the teosinte kernels from their stony cases. Another step was developing plants where the kernels remained intact on the cobs, unlike the teosinte ears, which shatter into individual kernels. Early cultivators had to notice among their stands of plants variants in which the nutritious kernels were at least partially exposed, or whose ears held together better, or that had more rows of kernels, and they had to selectively breed them. It is estimated that the initial domestication process that produced the basic maize form required at least several hundred to perhaps a few thousand years

HERE


Bottom line is THEY DO NOT KNOW WHERE CORN COMES FROM.


Perhaps it was 'Given' to the Myans by their 'Gods from the stars'? Corn (so they say) was only found in the Americas until after Columbus. Yet, the Rosslyn Chapel of Templar Knights reputation has corn decorations on its interior, though it was built years before the discovery of the Americas.

[Image: stone+offering+box+c_+AD1325-1521.jpg]


[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ6GW3aCEyQarC36SMwqXP...jGlJHse_Pg]


The humble origin of corn remains mysterious because the ancestral wild plant has never been located. It is an established, scientific fact that corn is a cultigen, a plant that has been engineered. This means that it has become so altered by humans that it cannot reproduce naturally and is entirely dependent upon man’s continued cultivation to survive.

Quote:To further appreciate the paradox that this situation imposes upon us we have to understand, domesticated crop plants are nothing like their wild ancestors. Farmers have long known this fact.

The differences are so great that most of the specific ancestral locations of our cereal crops remain a mystery. We must ponder what this really means. What are the implications of our scientists not being able to trace the specific wild ancestors of modern corn, wheat, rye, barely and rice?


How were these quantum leaps made and where is the evidence to support the orthodox theory that humans engineered them?

How can humans engineer these plants from native grain plants, when our bodies are still not adapted to digest uncooked grains? And WHY would they choose 1 plant out of 195,000 plants (which held NO value) and spend GENERATIONS of time and effort in the hopes that this plant would change to something they could use?

They wouldn't.


...to be continued

popnana
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#2
Within a few thousand years, maize had become a staple food crop throughout Mesoamerica, and was a main subsistence base of the Maya, Aztec, and related early civilizations. All specimens of primitive maize known from archaeological sites are domesticated forms. Maize is not included in any categories of "wild-food production."

There is no consensus that exists that explain its origins. Highly unusual for a plant that has sustained humans as a staple food for 10's of thousands of years. And just happens to coincide with the move into a more 'civilized' culture 7- 10 thousand years ago.

The three most popular theories are:

1- The Orthodox Teosinte Theory- 'maize was derived from the wild grass teosinte' (check op) But transitional plants are not included in any archaeological records when you would expect that they would be considering the amount of time it would take to 'domesticate' the origin plant and no original plant has ever been found!


2- The Catastrophic Sexual Transmutation Theory- Through a series of genetic mutations the the male reproductive organ was transformed into the unisexual maize ear (the female organ) by having an environment with a close proximity to volcanoes.

3- The Wild Maize Hypothesis- The theory states there must have once been a wild race of maize, now extinct, from which the cultivated form evolved. The problem with this theory is that no fossilized examples of the putative ancestral maize has ever been found!
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#3
[Image: 1-_Ancient-_Aliens.png]

[Image: 1517575862221.png]
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#4
Thanks for the post this really made me think this morning.
Just let that shit go
Ishtahota, Shakey On the Beach  likes this!
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#5
The Native American's believe that corn, or Maize, was a gift of the Great Spirit, and in some cases corn represented a goddess.

The answer may well be in their old legends.
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#6
i hate hate watching people eat corn.... it's the most disgusting thing on this planet to see lol
- Follow me on Twiiter @Real_Vengeance.  Be at one with yourself in between that line of serenity and rage -
                                       -SkyGuy-
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#7
(02-02-2018, 10:59 AM)KillTheCarnage Wrote: The Native American's believe that corn, or Maize, was a gift of the Great Spirit, and in some cases corn represented a goddess.

The answer may well be in their old legends.

Yeah3


It is also found 1000's of years earlier in Egypt!

[Image: egyptian-maize.jpg]
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#8
This has to be the corniest post ever I love it
Just let that shit go
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#9
(02-02-2018, 11:11 AM)Ishtahota Wrote:
(02-02-2018, 10:59 AM)KillTheCarnage Wrote: The Native American's believe that corn, or Maize, was a gift of the Great Spirit, and in some cases corn represented a goddess.

The answer may well be in their old legends.

Yeah3


It is also found 1000's of years earlier in Egypt!

[Image: egyptian-maize.jpg]

Good find.

Have you looked at the diversity of different strains in corn?

Corn is amazing.

There's blue corn, black corn, white corn, blood red corn, and many many more.

That yellow crap you get from the supermarket isn't even remotely the best tasting corn.
Astrochik, Ishtahota  likes this!
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#10
(02-02-2018, 11:15 AM)goddess101 Wrote: This has to be the corniest post ever I love it

Chuckle Amaizing, I know.
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