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Boing 737 Max 8
#11
This article has been revised to reflect the following correction: An earlier version of this article misidentified a United Nations agency whose employees died in the Ethiopian Airways plane crash. It is the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, not the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.
The flight route from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital, to Nairobi, Kenya, is sometimes referred to as a “U.N. shuttle” because of how often United Nations staff members take it.


On Sunday, when Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 plummeted to the ground shortly after takeoff, killing more than 150 people, the plane had a particularly high concentration of United Nations employees: At least 19 staff members died in the crash, the United Nations said in a statement.
The airline said the flight had passengers from at least 30 countries, some of whom were aid workers for other humanitarian organizations.
The dead included at least 32 Kenyans; 18 Canadians; nine each from Ethiopia and France; eight each from the United States, China and Italy; and seven from Britain, according to the airline, officials and news accounts. The identities of many of the victims, including the Americans, have not been released.
The World Food Program of the United Nations said seven of its employees died. Six employees from the United Nations office in Nairobi were killed, the organization said, and two from the International Telecommunications Union also died. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Geneva said three of the agency’s staff died.
Addis Ababa and Nairobi are home to United Nations offices. But the flight between the cities may have been carrying a particularly high number of United Nations workers because it was the day before a session of the United Nations Environment Assembly, described as the world’s highest-level decision-making body on the environment. The event, which starts on Monday, brings together representatives from United Nations member states to address environmental problems.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/19-...spartandhp
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#12
(03-10-2019, 11:45 PM)Dire_effects Wrote: Ethiopian air...Perhaps someone didn't full load the rubber band?

Look...from what I've read by pro contract techs and pilots, ET is one of the most pro airlines on that continent if not that part of the world. The jokes about, "How many Ethiopians can you fit in a 737MAX?" have not been well-received on the civil aviation forums. Ya feel me?

This incident can be laid squarely at the feet of Boeing, IMHO. They and the FAA have been aware of this issue since 2014. It's a matter of lives at stake vs $$$.
Lower Frequencies on a Higher Plane
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#13
(03-11-2019, 09:53 AM)Red Auroras Wrote:
(03-11-2019, 09:10 AM)Procrastinator9000 Wrote: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeremybogai...a695777b1f


The accident follows the crash of a Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX 8 in October in Indonesia that claimed 189 lives. A preliminary report from Indonesian crash investigators suggests that the plane's pilots struggled with an automatic anti-stall system that appears to have engaged due to erroneous readings from an angle of attack sensor, pushing the plane into a dive.

Boeing has faced accusations that it failed to properly inform pilots and airlines of the anti-stall controls, which are new to the 737 MAX. Boeing has said that pilot manuals already contained instructions on how to override other automatic systems that could push the aircraft’s nose down.

Scream1

Facepalm "failed to properly inform..." How about didn't even tell them the system (MCAS) was installed? Right now, the question is whether the MCAS has a software glitch or if its input to the trim is a result of a bad AoA sensor. I decided yesterday that until this all shakes out, I ain't gettin' on a next-gen 737-anything.

https://theaircurrent.com/aviation-safet...cas-jt610/
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#14
(03-11-2019, 10:49 AM)Procrastinator9000 Wrote: https://theaircurrent.com/aviation-safet...cas-jt610/

Damnit, they won't let me cut'n'paste. But look at the text directly above the 737 diagram. That's exactly what I've been saying. Pilots weren't even aware of the system until LionAir went down.
Lower Frequencies on a Higher Plane
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#15
(03-11-2019, 10:38 AM)Red Auroras Wrote:
(03-10-2019, 11:45 PM)Dire_effects Wrote: Ethiopian air...Perhaps someone didn't full load the rubber band?

Look...from what I've read by pro contract techs and pilots, ET is one of the most pro airlines on that continent if not that part of the world. The jokes about, "How many Ethiopians can you fit in a 737MAX?" have not been well-received on the civil aviation forums. Ya feel me?

This incident can be laid squarely at the feet of Boeing, IMHO. They and the FAA have been aware of this issue since 2014. It's a matter of lives at stake vs $$$.

Wanker Wanker Wanker
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#16
(03-11-2019, 09:10 AM)Procrastinator9000 Wrote: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeremybogai...a695777b1f


The accident follows the crash of a Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX 8 in October in Indonesia that claimed 189 lives. A preliminary report from Indonesian crash investigators suggests that the plane's pilots struggled with an automatic anti-stall system that appears to have engaged due to erroneous readings from an angle of attack sensor, pushing the plane into a dive.

Boeing has faced accusations that it failed to properly inform pilots and airlines of the anti-stall controls, which are new to the 737 MAX. Boeing has said that pilot manuals already contained instructions on how to override other automatic systems that could push the aircraft’s nose down.

Scream1

Sounds to me like they imported Hal into this system:

Hal: Dave, I'm putting your plane into a nose dive.

Dave: What ??!!

Hal: To avoid a fatal crash, you must immediately follow these intricate steps ...


Anon I know, Probably not funny. But ...
   “Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful. And kindle in them the fire of your love. Send forth Your Spirit and they shall be created. And you will renew the face of the earth.”    

"Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other." ~ John Adams  
.
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#17
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-03-1...adly-crash


The FAA, which is monitoring the investigation into the crash of Ethiopian Air flight ET302, is now looking into an incident involving another Boeing 737, which is a generation prior to the 737 MAX, after United Airlines flight 1168 reported engine trouble during a turbulent landing in Houston. The flight declared an emergency as it was coming in for a landing when it suddenly began experiencing engine trouble.
Scratchinghead
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#18
(03-11-2019, 01:07 PM)Aquarius Wrote: Sounds to me like they imported Hal into this system:

Hal:  Dave, I'm putting your plane into a nose dive.  

Dave:  What ??!!  

Hal:  To avoid a fatal crash, you must immediately follow these intricate steps ...

Anon  I know,  Probably not funny.  But ...

Actually, pretty close! Thing is, the steps aren't that intricate. It's more a matter of the pilot having time to complete them. Consider that the highest terrain in the area was ~8100ft and the plane was barely 9k' in the air.
Lower Frequencies on a Higher Plane
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#19
(03-11-2019, 12:55 PM)Dire_effects Wrote:
(03-11-2019, 10:38 AM)Red Auroras Wrote:
(03-10-2019, 11:45 PM)Dire_effects Wrote: Ethiopian air...Perhaps someone didn't full load the rubber band?

Look...from what I've read by pro contract techs and pilots, ET is one of the most pro airlines on that continent if not that part of the world. The jokes about, "How many Ethiopians can you fit in a 737MAX?" have not been well-received on the civil aviation forums. Ya feel me?

This incident can be laid squarely at the feet of Boeing, IMHO. They and the FAA have been aware of this issue since 2014. It's a matter of lives at stake vs $$$.

Wanker  Wanker  Wanker

Yep...we can always count on you for an intelligent response!
Lower Frequencies on a Higher Plane
Procrastinator9000, sivil  likes this!
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#20
(03-11-2019, 02:31 PM)Red Auroras Wrote:
(03-11-2019, 12:55 PM)Dire_effects Wrote:
(03-11-2019, 10:38 AM)Red Auroras Wrote: Look...from what I've read by pro contract techs and pilots, ET is one of the most pro airlines on that continent if not that part of the world. The jokes about, "How many Ethiopians can you fit in a 737MAX?" have not been well-received on the civil aviation forums. Ya feel me?

This incident can be laid squarely at the feet of Boeing, IMHO. They and the FAA have been aware of this issue since 2014. It's a matter of lives at stake vs $$$.

Wanker  Wanker  Wanker

Yep...we can always count on you for an intelligent response!

Wanker Wanker Wanker
sivil  likes this!
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