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Boing 737 Max 8
#1





2nd fatal crash in 5 months involving new Boeing model also flown by WestJet and Air Canada
Boeing said it is sending a technical team to the site of the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines flight that killed 157 people, including 18 Canadians, following another recent crash in Indonesia of the new, popular airplane model, the 737 MAX 8.
The 737 MAX 8 plane crashed shortly after takeoff from Bole airport in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa en route to Nairobi on Sunday.
The aircraft was also involved in a Lion Air crash in October when a two-month-old plane plunged into the Java Sea minutes after taking off from Jakarta, Indonesia, killing 189 people.
In Canada, both WestJet and Air Canada use the aircraft — Air Canada said they have performed safely and reliably, and WestJet said it will not speculate on the cause of the incident.
Air Canada said it has offered its assistance in the investigation. The airline said it has operated the same type of passenger jet since 2017, when the model entered commercial use, and currently has 24 in its fleet.

Cite: https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/ethiopia-b...-1.5050682

The World Food Program is confirming that two of the eight Italian victims aboard the Ethiopian Airlines jet worked for the Rome-based U.N. agency.

A WFP spokeswoman identified the victims as Virginia Chimenti and Maria Pilar Buzzetti.
Another three Italians worked for the Bergamo-based humanitarian agency Africa Tremila: Carlo Spini, his wife Gabriella Viggiani and the treasurer, Matteo Ravasio.
In addition, Paolo Dieci, a prominent aid advocate with the International Committee for the Development of Peoples, known by its acronym CISP, was killed.
Also among the Italian dead was Sebastiano Tusa, a noted underwater archaeologist and the Sicilian regional assessor at the Culture Ministry. RAI state television said he was heading to Malindi, Kenya to participate in a UNESCO conference on safeguarding underwater cultural heritage in east Africa, which opens Monday.
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10:15 p.m.
A U.N. official says the United Nations expects that about a dozen passengers affiliated with the world organization were on the Ethiopian Airlines jet that crashed outside Addis Ababa killing all 157 people on board, but it could be more.
The official, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue, said Sunday that national delegates who might have been heading to U.N. meetings, including the U.N. Environment Program's assembly, wouldn't be included in the count.
U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi said some colleagues were among the victims.
Earlier, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said he is "deeply saddened" by the crash that including U.N. staff members, according to a statement from U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric, who gave no details.

Cite: https://www.carlyleobserver.com/the-late...1.23659222

It is not yet clear what caused the crash of the new Boeing 737-8 MAX plane shortly after takeoff from Bole Airport en route to Kenya's capital, Nairobi.
The airline's CEO says the pilot sent out a distress call and was given clearance to return.
The victims also include 32 Kenyans, nine Ethiopians, eight people each from the United States, China and Italy, seven each from France and Britain, and six from Egypt.
Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland called the crash terrible news.
"My heartfelt condolences to all those who have lost loved ones," she wrote on Twitter. "The Canadian government is in close contact with Ethiopian authorities to gather additional information as quickly as possible."


It is likely the plane was carrying people set to attend a major United Nations environmental conference in Nairobi. The U.N. Environment Assembly is set to begin on Monday in Kenya's capital, where the plane was headed. U.N. Environment has said more than 4,700 heads of state, ministers, business leaders and others would attend.
The plane was new and had been delivered to the airline in November, records show.

Cite: https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2019/03/10..._23688876/
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#2
https://the-fringe.com/thread-q_thread_u...#pid777318
Lower Frequencies on a Higher Plane

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#3
Ethiopian air...Perhaps someone didn't full load the rubber band?
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#4
This thing sucks.

I was gonna say I was worried. but that would be a lie.
"100% Bullshit" - Han Sole
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#5
Information 
China grounds its 737 MAX fleet after latest-gen Boeing jet suffers 2nd crash in 5 months

[Image: 5c85b531dda4c8ab168b45e1.JPG]
Ceremony marking the 1st delivery of a Boeing 737 Max 8 to Air China, December 15, 2018 ©  Reuters / Thomas Peter

Chinese airlines have been ordered to ground their Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes, after the modern jet suffered a second fatal crash in just five months – with its aviation watchdog noting disturbing similarities between the incidents.

“Given that two accidents both involved newly delivered Boeing 737-8 planes and happened during take-off phase, they have some degree of similarity,” the Civil Aviation Administration of China said Monday, emphasizing its principle of zero-tolerance on any safety hazards.

All Chinese domestic airlines were requested to suspend operation of the 737-8s by 6:00pm local time (10:00am GMT) and, according to local media and flight tracking resources, on most routes the jet has already been replaced with older-generation planes.

With the first 737 MAX crash in late October still under investigation, the tragedy on Sunday that claimed 157 lives might well have been a coincidence, but security concerns and the potential grounding of the entire MAX fleet would severely impact Boeing’s business. A Boeing spokesman declined Reuters’ request for a comment.

Chinese carriers account for about 20 percent of the plane’s sales, with dozens of Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets already in operation and many more scheduled for delivery. China Southern Airlines Co. has the biggest fleet, with 16 of the aircraft, while Air China Ltd. currently operates 14 jets. China Eastern Airlines Corp. has 13.

‘Some degree of similarity’

While the US manufacturer continues to emphasize the jet’s “unmatched reliability” and to market MAX 8 as the customer's preferred choice for “comfortable flying experience,” the latest generation Boeing 737 has a gloomy track record since its commercial debut in 2017, having been involved in two fatal crashes in the last five months.

On October 29, 2018, a two-months-old jet belonging to Indonesian low-cost airline Lion Air crashed into the Java Sea, just 13 minutes after takeoff from Jakarta. All 189 on board died. The cause of the crash is still under investigation, but early reports indicate that the pilots struggled to control the climb due to an autopilot system malfunction, which kept on forcing the jet's nose to dive.

[...] Continued...
https://www.rt.com/business/453487-china...g-737-max/
Where there is imbalance I am the counterweight. Beware, for if you are a cause of imbalance you may not enjoy my presence.
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#6
Information 
Boeing cancels 777X launch event after Ethiopian Airlines’ 737 MAX 8 crash

[Image: 5c85cc60fc7e93fd258b45d3.png]
© Boeing

The ceremonial debut of Boeing’s 777x wide body aircraft, planned for March 13 in Seattle, will be postponed indefinitely, the company said, following the second deadly accident in just five months involving its 737 Max 8 plane.

“We will look for an opportunity to mark the new plane with the world in the near future,” Boeing said in a statement Sunday night, emphasizing that at the moment the company was focused on “supporting” Ethiopian Airlines in the wake of the tragic air accident, which claimed 157 lives.

The unveiling ceremony at Boeing's Everett Factory was supposed to be attended by top executives and numerous honored guests, who were more-than-eager to see the presentation of the "largest and most efficient twin-engine jet in the world."

Designed to build on the success of the 777 and 787 Dreamliner series, the plane is being assembled to replace the current generation of retiring 747 fleets. Production of the first 777X test model began in 2017, with first deliveries scheduled for next year. Once operational, the plane is expected to sell for at least $360.5 million.

Boeing's plans, however, were thrown into disarray on Sunday, when Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed just six minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa en route to Nairobi, Kenya. All 157 people on board, mostly foreigners, were killed in the incident. Following the tragedy, Boeing announced that it will dispatch an investigative team to the crash site to provide technical assistance. The 737 MAX was only four-months-old when the jet allegedly demonstrated "unstable vertical speed” during its takeoff. The official cause of the crash is not yet known.

Sunday's disaster was the second recorded crash of the brand new Boeing narrow-body aircraft. In October, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 operated by Lion Air crashed minutes after taking off from Jakarta, Indonesia, killing all 189 passengers and crew. That crash is also under investigation.

Despite the cancellation of the inauguration ceremony, the 777X's development program will proceed on-schedule, the company said.




https://www.rt.com/business/453489-boein...77x-debut/
Where there is imbalance I am the counterweight. Beware, for if you are a cause of imbalance you may not enjoy my presence.
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#7
It may or may not be Boeing's fault, but that is a major hit to one of the last big ticket things the US manufactured.

Something I notice is, people cannot admit when something gets hypercomplex to the point of failure. I bet they rushed the test person, trying to get this to market delivery, and here is the result.
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#8
(03-11-2019, 12:16 AM)PickleSnout Wrote: It may or may not be Boeing's fault, but that is a major hit to one of the last big ticket things the US manufactured.

Something I notice is, people cannot admit when something gets hypercomplex to the point of failure. I bet they rushed the test person, trying to get this to market delivery, and here is the result.

Yeah.

Shit is so over-done that we went full stupid that can't be fixed.
"100% Bullshit" - Han Sole
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#9
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeremybogai...a695777b1f


The accident follows the crash of a Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX 8 in October in Indonesia that claimed 189 lives. A preliminary report from Indonesian crash investigators suggests that the plane's pilots struggled with an automatic anti-stall system that appears to have engaged due to erroneous readings from an angle of attack sensor, pushing the plane into a dive.

Boeing has faced accusations that it failed to properly inform pilots and airlines of the anti-stall controls, which are new to the 737 MAX. Boeing has said that pilot manuals already contained instructions on how to override other automatic systems that could push the aircraft’s nose down.

Scream1
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#10
(03-11-2019, 09:10 AM)Procrastinator9000 Wrote: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeremybogai...a695777b1f


The accident follows the crash of a Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX 8 in October in Indonesia that claimed 189 lives. A preliminary report from Indonesian crash investigators suggests that the plane's pilots struggled with an automatic anti-stall system that appears to have engaged due to erroneous readings from an angle of attack sensor, pushing the plane into a dive.

Boeing has faced accusations that it failed to properly inform pilots and airlines of the anti-stall controls, which are new to the 737 MAX. Boeing has said that pilot manuals already contained instructions on how to override other automatic systems that could push the aircraft’s nose down.

Scream1

Facepalm "failed to properly inform..." How about didn't even tell them the system (MCAS) was installed? Right now, the question is whether the MCAS has a software glitch or if its input to the trim is a result of a bad AoA sensor. I decided yesterday that until this all shakes out, I ain't gettin' on a next-gen 737-anything.
Lower Frequencies on a Higher Plane

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