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AP U.S. History Textbook
#11
(04-16-2018, 02:28 AM)Suzy Q Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:19 AM)Verity Wrote: There was a thread awhile back also about the AP US History book,
about their total bastardization of the second amendment. They
actually rewrote it iirc. If I can find it I'll post here.

It's all outrageous!

Many schools no longer teach cursive writing it's considered a bygone.  They also no longer teach the constitution or bill of rights.  Funny how our founding documents are all written in cursive which many will not understand if they tried to read it.

I know, the cursive issue really bugs me. Very good point about our most treasured
historical documents.

Writing used to be a sort of art form in and of itself. Not even going back to such
years as you reference but think of how "old school" folks learned to write, and how
so many of those generations (Silent and older) still have beautiful writing to this day.

I'm glad that we (Gen X myself) learned it but we did not have those scrupulous
habits drilled into us as our predecessors did. To the point we could rely on prod-
ucing a consistent, beautiful hand. Most of us these days use a hodgepodge, self-
created form, often a hybridized writing/printing.

My nephew (12 yo) enjoys writing in cursive, but is dissuaded from doing so by his
educators. Angry I don't know that I've ever even heard the reasoning behind
abandoning writing. Eta I see from your post I guess it is considered passee? Such
a shame.

(having no luck finding the other thread)
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#12
(04-16-2018, 02:37 AM)dazedb42 Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:33 AM)Suzy Q Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:32 AM)dazedb42 Wrote: There are now college kids that were never taught cursive writing.

There's a reason behind it.

I don't write like the 1800's now either. Keyboard skills are a more useful tool to teach.

Could someone who's never learned cursive read for themselves the original founding documents of our country? Not what someone interpreted for them or a print out of what could be altered...the originals.
Goodness strikes
Maybe once, maybe twice
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#13
(04-16-2018, 02:28 AM)Suzy Q Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:19 AM)Verity Wrote: There was a thread awhile back also about the AP US History book,
about their total bastardization of the second amendment. They
actually rewrote it iirc. If I can find it I'll post here.

It's all outrageous!

Many schools no longer teach cursive writing it's considered a bygone.  They also no longer teach the constitution or bill of rights.  Funny how our founding documents are all written in cursive which many will not understand if they tried to read it.



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#14
(04-16-2018, 02:44 AM)Suzy Q Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:37 AM)dazedb42 Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:33 AM)Suzy Q Wrote: There's a reason behind it.

I don't write like the 1800's now either. Keyboard skills are a more useful tool to teach.

Could someone who's never learned cursive read for themselves the original founding documents of our country?  Not what someone interpreted for them or a print out of what could be altered...the originals.

It's cursive not hieroglyphics, I wasn't able taught to write in Victorian cursive but I can read it. I'm more pissed at not being able to read Latin.
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#15
This author and publisher has hope that cursive will return:

https://hintsandechoes.wordpress.com/201...d-cursive/

Rachel Jeantel Isn’t the Only One Who Can’t Read Cursive

We should not have been surprised when the star witness for the prosecution in the George Zimmerman trial, a 19-year-old high school graduate, couldn’t read a letter handed to her by the defense attorney because, as she explained, “I don’t read cursive.”  For many young people, cursive handwriting might as well be hieroglyphics. High school teachers say they no longer write in cursive on the board or on student papers because  their students can’t read it. The customer rep at my bank recently told me that she has to print when she writes a note to the tellers.

Where The Teaching of Cursive Stands  The new Common Core Standards, adopted by 45 states, make the teaching of handwriting optional, and sentiment for dropping it altogether is widespread. To their credit, five State Boards of Education—Alabama, Massachusetts, Georgia, California, and Kansas—have included cursive in the standards for their schools, and the North Carolina legislature has actually passed a law requiring the teaching of cursive.

As far as I know, nobody is recommending that we not teach any form of handwriting at all. Typically manuscript printing or what is known as “ball-and-stick” is taught in first (sometimes kindergarten) through second grade. Cursive has then been taught in third though fourth grade. It should be said here that there are different forms of cursive writing. What most people think of as cursive is whatever they themselves were taught, which in the United States is probably a form of what might be called “looped or conventional cursive.” An alternative, Italic cursive, has no loops, is not preceded by ball-and-stick printing, but printed letters that are like the cursive form but unconnected. Many people assume that ball-and-stick, because it looks like print in books, helps children learn to read.

But What About That? Ball-and-stick was first introduced in the New York City school system in 1922 by Marjorie Wise, a reading specialist. Before then, children just learned cursive from the beginning. Wise herself eventually recognized that there are drawbacks to ball and stick, but by then it had caught on throughout the United States and we were stuck with it. Actually because of the fluid left-to-right movement of cursive and the fact that spaces come between words, not individual letters, it is more helpful to the beginning reader than ball-and-stick.

But why teach cursive at all? In ways not yet fully understood, being able to write fluently and rapidly in a running hand actually helps the brain learn how to work more efficiently. Research suggests that cursive facilitates creativity, helps memory, and gives kids a powerful tool  for learning. What is unique about cursive is the fluidity of movement, which does not happen when one has to lift the pen between every letter or when one is tapping on a keyboard.


Where do we go from here? I’m afraid that saving cursive depends on more neuroscientific research. Only that will convince many teachers and parents that there are benefits to be had from knowing how to write fluently in a running hand that no other form of written communication offers. It will take time, but I’m convinced that will happen. Meanwhile it seems we will be turning out high school graduates who cannot sign their names.
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#16
(04-16-2018, 02:44 AM)Suzy Q Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:37 AM)dazedb42 Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:33 AM)Suzy Q Wrote: There's a reason behind it.

I don't write like the 1800's now either. Keyboard skills are a more useful tool to teach.

Could someone who's never learned cursive read for themselves the original founding documents of our country?  Not what someone interpreted for them or a print out of what could be altered...the originals.

I'd say yes, reading is much easier than writing.
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#17
(04-16-2018, 02:28 AM)Suzy Q Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:19 AM)Verity Wrote: There was a thread awhile back also about the AP US History book,
about their total bastardization of the second amendment. They
actually rewrote it iirc. If I can find it I'll post here.

It's all outrageous!

Many schools no longer teach cursive writing it's considered a bygone.  They also no longer teach the constitution or bill of rights.  Funny how our founding documents are all written in cursive which many will not understand if they tried to read it.

And we must bring back the teaching of civics! It is crucial, and would
go so far in alleviating so many of the problems we are currently
dealing with.
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#18
(04-16-2018, 03:10 AM)dazedb42 Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:44 AM)Suzy Q Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:37 AM)dazedb42 Wrote: I don't write like the 1800's now either. Keyboard skills are a more useful tool to teach.

Could someone who's never learned cursive read for themselves the original founding documents of our country?  Not what someone interpreted for them or a print out of what could be altered...the originals.

I'd say yes, reading is much easier than writing.

Half of the students can't read either. Just google any random school's ratings. There's sites with ratings, reviews, and test scores. I guarandamntee you'll be hard pressed to find a school with over 60% testing at the level they should.
Goodness strikes
Maybe once, maybe twice
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#19
(04-16-2018, 03:20 AM)Suzy Q Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 03:10 AM)dazedb42 Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 02:44 AM)Suzy Q Wrote: Could someone who's never learned cursive read for themselves the original founding documents of our country?  Not what someone interpreted for them or a print out of what could be altered...the originals.

I'd say yes, reading is much easier than writing.

Half of the students can't read either.  Just google any random school's ratings.  There's sites with ratings, reviews, and test scores.  I guarandamntee you'll be hard pressed to find a school with over 60% testing at the level they should.

That has more to do with demographic forcing destroying literacy rates. Don't get me wrong, I am well aware of a softening of educational standards because obviously being literate is White Supremacy or the Patriarchy at work or some shit. Cursive writing being replaced by learning to type is not a biggy compared to civics and history and learning the scientific method.

A lot of the problems are due to a feelings over facts approach to teaching which correlate very well with women taking over management positions within schools. Is it a conspiracy of incompetence or malicious intent? Probably both working in tandem. I have multiple teachers in my family and all of them want the best for the children and yet are constantly frustrated by feel good programs which make their jobs harder.
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#20
I'm in the process of waiting for my daughters permit to be approved to attend a school that's less than a mile away from our home. We're in a district that would bus her to a shit school over 3 miles away. It's some kind of diversity game I'm not playing. If she's not approved I have a private school as backup.
Goodness strikes
Maybe once, maybe twice
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