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Full Version: The Irish Genocide 1845-1852
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpwKEXg2StE

A controversial look at how the "Great Potato Famine" of Ireland in the 19th century. It was not a famine as there was plenty of food other than potatoes. The British government stood idly by and let millions of Irish die in what is now being called genocide.

A blight upon the potatoes of Ireland forever changed the histories of Ireland, England, and the United States of America. The blight that we now know was a water mold (and not a fungus as originally believed), Phytophthora infestans, attacked the cash crop of the Irish Catholic peasant farmer. This was the crop with which the Irish paid their rent to the English and Protestant landlords.

Starving Irish peasants tried to eat the rotten potatoes and fell ill to cholera and typhus and whole villages were struck down. Many landlords evicted the starving tenants who could be found dying on sides of roads with mouths green from eating grass to fill their bellies. Other families were sent to workhouses where the overcrowding and poor conditions led to more starvation, sickness, and ultimately death. Going to a workhouse was akin to marching to one's own death. Some more sympathetic landlords paid the passage for their tenants to emigrate to America, Canada, and Australia. Ship owners took advantage of the situation and wedged hundreds of diseased and desperate Irish into ships that were hardly sea-worthy for the Trans-Atlantic trip. These ships became known as "coffin ships" as more than one-third of the passengers died on the voyage.

The Irish that did survive the trip to America, Canada, or Australia on the coffin ships drummed up awareness and more importantly, aid in the form of food. But for every one ship sailing into Ireland with food, more were exporting grain-based alcohol, wool and flax, and other necessities such as wheat, oats, barley, butter, eggs, beef, and pork that could have helped feed the Irish people. The Irish themselves were accused of bringing the famine on themselves as they were viewed as a lazy, overpopulated race of people - never mind that they were not legally able to fish or hunt under British law. They starved in the midst of plenty because they were not allowed to provide for themselves and their families by any means other than agriculture.

 The Famine, or An Górta Mór, the Great Hunger, took more than one million lives, between those that died of starvation and those that left Ireland for a better life in America or elsewhere in the world. Those who were left behind in Ireland experienced a desperation that led to a massive change in politics and nationalism - it was only a few years later, in 1858 that the Irish Republican Brotherhood was founded. The British government and the British and Irish Protestant landowners still required the Irish peasants and laborers to pay their rent for the land they could not work due to the blight and the hunger upon them. In a lush island surrounded by water teaming with fish and land that fattened pig and cattle alike, how could one failed crop cause a Famine? According to British law, Irish Catholics could not apply for fishing or hunting licenses. Their pigs and cattle were sent to England to feed the British and to export for trade, while the landlords kept the fine cuts for themselves. Ireland was part of the British Empire, the most powerful empire in the world at that time - yet the British government stood by and did nothing to help their subjects overcome this hardship. In our time, an enforced famine such as this would be labeled genocide yet in the 1800s it was merely an unfortunate tragedy. As defined in the United Nation's 1948 Genocide Convention and the 1987 Genocide Convention Implementation Act, the legal definition of genocide is any of the acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group, including by killing its members; causing them serious bodily or mental harm; deliberately inflicting on a group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; and forcibly transferring children of the group to another group. The British policy of mass starvation inflicted on Ireland from 1845 to 1850 constituted "genocide" against the Irish People as legally defined by the United Nations. A quote by John Mitchell (who published The United Irishman) states that "The Almighty indeed sent the potato blight, but the English created the Famine.
 
http://www.irishhistorylinks.net/History...ocide.html

According to historian Chris Fogarty,
the "Irish Potato Famine" which killed over five million people 
was not a famine but a deliberate British policy of starvation similar to the
Holomodor in the Ukraine in 1932-33.

I grew up thinking that the Irish famine was a natural catastrophe caused by crop failure; the Irish were guilty of only cultivating only one crop-- potatoes. 

While Chris Fogarty was researching the biography of his paternal grandfather at the National Archives, he uncovered a policy of genocide . The truth is startling: 67 out of 130 regiments of Britain's Empire army were in Ireland during this period (100,000 at any one time). The troops were not on a humanitarian mission. Their job was to remove food by force. 

The nation starved as its food was confiscated, 40-70 shiploads a day were removed at gunpoint assisted by British constables, militia and troops. They seized tens of millions head of livestock, tens of millions of tons flour, grains and poultry. These vast quantities were more than enough to feed 18 million people.

The first lie was that the famine was due to the failure of the potato crop. When the quantity of exported Irish foodstuffs could no longer be concealed, the second lie was that the rich Irish were starving the poor Irish. G.B. Shaw wrote in Man and Superman 1897: "The Famine? No, the Starvation. When a country is full of food and exporting it, there can be no Famine."' 


- See more at: https://www.henrymakow.com/2015/06/irish...zr8CL.dpuf
Nope, only blacks and jews have suffered in our history - everything else is fake news.
I have put up threads on this in the past and it's not a pretty picture. Before the famine the English were selling Irish in indenture in the Americas, slavery in all but name. That in itself is a sad story. Blacks were worth more than the Irish slaves but mixtures were worth more than either, so Irish were paired with blacks to produce mulattos.
(04-22-2017, 01:45 PM)Natural Variability Wrote: [ -> ]I have put up threads on this in the past and it's not a pretty picture. Before the famine the English were selling Irish in indenture in the Americas, slavery in all but name. That in itself is a sad story. Blacks were worth more than the Irish slaves but mixtures were worth more than either, so Irish were paired with blacks to produce mulattos.

The Irish were ill suited to the climate they were sent to. Africans were used to it and could do more and live longer so they were preferred.
(04-22-2017, 02:53 PM)MysticPizza Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-22-2017, 01:45 PM)Natural Variability Wrote: [ -> ]I have put up threads on this in the past and it's not a pretty picture. Before the famine the English were selling Irish in indenture in the Americas, slavery in all but name. That in itself is a sad story. Blacks were worth more than the Irish slaves but mixtures were worth more than either, so Irish were paired with blacks to produce mulattos.

The Irish were ill suited to the climate they were sent to. Africans were used to it and could do more and live longer so they were preferred.

I'm 100% Irish and start to melt and feel miserable as soon as the temperature gets above 80.
Interesting,Titanic. I've read into this before. My ancestors wore skirts and played bagpipes. Irish Scottish. Campbell's and Bacon's. And Hi back to you, friend.

Russia's Potato Blight Worse Than Irish Famine's
Unisci.com, March 24, 2000
Quote:New virulent types of the potato late blight pathogen have emerged in Russia, threatening farmers and consumers with the destruction of an essential staple crop there, according to the Cornell-Eastern Europe-Mexico (CEEM) Potato Late Blight Program. The new strains of Phytopthora infestans, better known as potato late blight, are far more aggressive than the pathogen that triggered the Irish potato famine of the 1840s, having evolved through sexual mating. Unlike the old strains, the new pathogen can survive harsh winters in the soil, further endangering crops. "Potatoes are a sustaining food crop, the second bread for many parts of Russia. A severe late blight problem could harm millions of people and possibly destabilize the region," says W. Ronnie Coffman, the chairman of CEEM and the associate dean for research at Cornell University's New York State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. "But that would depend on whether alternate food supplies could be moved into the affected areas in a timely manner."