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Full Version: Gov. Brown declares California drought emergency is over
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Startlingly green hills, surging rivers and the snow-wrapped Sierra Nevada had already signaled what Gov. Jerry Brown made official Friday: The long California drought is over.
Brown issued an executive order that lifts the drought emergency in all but a handful of San Joaquin Valley counties where some communities are still coping with dried-up wells.
He also made it clear that the need for conservation is not going away.
“This drought emergency is over, but the next drought could be around the corner,” Brown said in a statement. “Conservation must remain a way of life.”
Five years of relentlessly sunny winter weather took a toll on California. In a move that showed the seriousness of the threat, Brown ordered a statewide 25% cut in urban water use, and Californians came close to meeting it by taking shorter showers, flushing less and accepting it when restaurants did away with the once obligatory glass of water. Cactus took root in frontyards and backyards where lawns once flourished.
The Sierra Nevada, now buried in snow, will be streaked for decades with miles-long brown swaths of pine trees that the drought weakened for beetles to kill. Years of low river flows pushed imperiled native fish closer to extinction.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-brown-drought-20170407-story.html

iam posting this while its raining right meow!
That's kind of silly he doesn't know how precipitation patterns are going to change. Even if they did get normal rainfall they still have a water mis-management problem. And their aquifers are being pumped out to meet the difference.
I mean the rainfall is good, but they have to spend some money and fix some things, remember Oroville dam?
governer brown is poised to spend monies on fixing the bad roads and other projects. but at a cost. higher taxes on gas and sales tax etc. our sales tax is about 9.50%
California should always be on a drought footing, imo.  Way to many people here for the water resources available to us.  I like the recent trend of lawn conversion to drought-resistant or native flora, but that so far equates to the proverbial drop-in-the-bucket as far as conservation.  Too many retarded people out here with no sense of or respect for ecology.  

But what else is new...

Smileyfud
i wish we had the resource to move out of california. its almost getting too expensive to live in the bay area. some fave places to live reno, NV, las vegas and south lake tahoe
(04-07-2017, 10:19 PM)shakeyflyface Wrote: [ -> ]California should always be on a drought footing, imo.  Way to many people here for the water resources available to us.  I like the recent trend of lawn conversion to drought-resistant or native flora, but that so far equates to the proverbial drop-in-the-bucket as far as conservation.  Too many retarded people out here with no sense of or respect for ecology.  

But what else is new...

Smileyfud

There are things the city can do like eliminate swimming pools, kentucky blue grass lawns and golf courses. That's probably 25% of their water use right there.
its odd that many apts where i live, they still have their swimming pools filled. been like that since the start of the stormy pattern many months ago. and they still allow the pools to be cleaned, wasting resources

Guest

(04-07-2017, 10:40 PM)SR-25 Wrote: [ -> ]its odd that many apts where i live, they still have their swimming pools filled. been like that since the start of the stormy pattern many months ago. and they still allow the pools to be cleaned, wasting resources

Recycling water too. They could easily recycle most sewage water back for industrial or irrigation use, they just need dedicated systems with no cross connections.

Thing is most cities are set up for 1 single delivery system of pipes so a recycled system with dedicated lines is so expensive they can't afford it. All the cost estimates engineers come up with can be multiplied by at least 3 by the time the project is complete, or 10 times if it's a public project.

We don't have enough money to repair our infrastructure because the more money they print devalues all the other dollars in circulation so the work just becomes more expensive.