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Full Version: Southern California earthquake swarm takes an unexpected turn, and that’s reason to worry
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https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-m...story.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHno_A7ky2s

https://youtu.be/Fe1Rr8xSYcA

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A swarm of earthquakes has shown remarkable staying power in the area around the Southern California city. The likelihood of a larger seismic event, given how many quakes that have occurred over such an extended period, is higher than normal, the scientist said.

“People ought to be concerned,” said Hauksson. “This is probably the most prolific swarm in that area of the Fontana seismic zone that we’ve seen in the past three decades.”

There have been more than 700 earthquakes recorded in the Fontana area since May 25, ranging from magnitude 0.7 to magnitude 3.2, recorded Wednesday at 5:20 p.m., according to Caltech staff seismologist Jen Andrews. Three of the quakes have been of magnitude 3 or greater.

The swarm initially moved northward, but something unusual began Friday when the swarm turned around and went south, back toward the middle of the activity and the 60 Freeway.

“This is somewhat of an unexpected evolution,” Hauksson said Friday evening. Furthermore, an analysis of the earthquakes shows that activity as of late Friday was fading pretty slowly — slower than would be expected for a typical sequence of aftershocks following a main shock, he said.

“That would suggest it’s going to continue for — I don’t know — at least several weeks,” Hauksson said Friday. “We’re watching what’s happening and trying to track that activity.”

Experts said the chance of a 7.0 or greater quake on the mighty fault increased significantly, from 1 in 6,000 in any given week to as much as 1 in 100 during that particular week.
Checking just now, there've been several "swarms" up and down the coast as well as inland. Then there's Oklahoma.