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Full Version: Fxsmsp Hacking Group Hacks Antivirus Providers
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Now, Gizmodo has reported that Trend Micro is included in the list of the three compromised antivirus firms.
It is worth mentioning that Fxsmsp hacking group has obtained the source code of the software of these firms by attacking their internal networks and compromising their servers. The stolen data, which accounts for approx. 30 terabytes, is being sold at a staggering rate of $300,000.

Symantec is the firm behind the much favored Norton Antivirus software. The company told Gizmodo that it has learned about the claims about Symantec being one of the victims of Fxsmsp’s attack but it also believes that its customers don’t need to feel concerned. Symantec’s spokesperson told Gizmodo that:
“There is no indication that Symantec has been impacted by this incident.”
AdvIntel, the company responsible for tracking Fxsmsp’s attack, states that it believes Symantec’s version despite that Fxsmsp has claimed that Symantec is in its list of targets. The reason AdvIntel doesn’t believe in Fxsmsp’s claims is due to the lack of authentic evidence to support the allegation. However, AdvIntel still believes that Fxsmsp is a real threat and has been conducting “verifiable corporate breaches.”
On the other hand, Trend Micro told Gizmodo that the data associated to one of its testing labs have been accessed but the incident is low risk since its source code hasn’t been exfiltrated or even accessed and customer data is also safe.

AdvIntel claims that this is an incorrect assessment because of the large data size that has been stolen by Fxsmsp. Trend Micro has vowed to conduct a thorough investigation of the matter in collaboration with law enforcement and will share the details transparently.

McAfee is also supposedly part of the list of attacked antivirus firms but the company couldn’t immediately confirm or deny that it has become a victim of a data breach.

Cite: https://www.hackread.com/trend-micro-ant...by-fxsmsp/

A hacking group, said to run in both English- and Russian-speaking circles online, have offered to sell internal documents and code allegedly stolen from the servers of three major anti-virus companies.
A hacking collective called “Fxsmsp” claimed responsibility for compromising the internal networks of the three companies, according to a report Thursday by the thread-research firm AdvIntel. The group is reportedly offering to sell materials it stole for over $300,000.

Fxsmsp is a “credible threat” that has raked in close to $1 million by selling off data stolen in “verifiable corporate breaches,” AdvIntel researchers have assessed with high confidence. “They have a long-standing reputation for selling sensitive information from high-profile global government and corporate entities,” the company said in a report.
Ars Technica reported that the potential victims have been notified. AdvIntel, which first alerted law enforcement to the alleged intrusions, has not identified the victims publicly.

The company said it had reviewed screenshots of folders purportedly containing up to 30 terabytes of stolen data. The information, it said, appeared relevant to the companies’ “development documentation, artificial intelligence model, web security software, and antivirus software base code.”
AdvIntel did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
“Most recently, the actor [Fxsmsp] claimed to have developed a credential-stealing botnet capable of infecting high-profile targets in order to exfiltrate sensitive usernames and passwords,” the company reported. Profiting from data theft has long been Fxmsp’s stated goal, it said.

Cite: https://gizmodo.com/top-antivirus-compan...1834652937
Well beyond hilarity.
(05-16-2019, 08:27 AM)mmmmkay_ultra Wrote: [ -> ]Well beyond hilarity.

I would quit using those antivirus companies that have been taken over, that is for sure, I mean now this group probably determines your virus definitions. Also when they deliver software, maybe they have modified it. Best to just stay away.
(05-16-2019, 08:36 AM)sivil Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-16-2019, 08:27 AM)mmmmkay_ultra Wrote: [ -> ]Well beyond hilarity.

I would quit using those antivirus companies that have been taken over, that is for sure, I mean now this group probably determines your virus definitions.  Also when they deliver software, maybe they have modified it.  Best to just stay away.


I was seeing news about some Robo Call app in response to the need to block robo/spam numbers this morning and it reminded me how 'paranoid' I am that by using all these apps and updates for "security and privacy" is actually stream lining back doors alllll up into your DATA ass...

Yeah3
Lmao
(05-16-2019, 08:46 AM)mmmmkay_ultra Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-16-2019, 08:36 AM)sivil Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-16-2019, 08:27 AM)mmmmkay_ultra Wrote: [ -> ]Well beyond hilarity.

I would quit using those antivirus companies that have been taken over, that is for sure, I mean now this group probably determines your virus definitions.  Also when they deliver software, maybe they have modified it.  Best to just stay away.


I was seeing news about some Robo Call app in response to the need to block robo/spam numbers this morning and it reminded me how 'paranoid' I am that by using all these apps and updates for "security and privacy" is actually stream lining back doors alllll up into your DATA ass...

Yeah3
Lmao

I looked into blocking those robot spammers too, there are some apps you can get at the play store, some of them are pretty expensive, they say that Robot Kill one is a rip off because a lot of the reviews say they tried to cancel but couldn't so stay away from that one. Damn the Play Store was screwing up and allowing some malware apps to be distributed off its platform. i would say read everything before you sign anything.