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Full Version: NEW: Hillary Clinton Aide Admits Under Oath That He and Clinton Used Unsecured Personal Email to Conduct Official State
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Jake Sullivan admitted under oath to Judicial Watch that both he and Hillary used her private, unsecured, non- “state.gov” email system to conduct official State Department business.

So Crooked Hillary wasn’t only using that private server system to email people about yoga and Chelsea’s wedding?

Sullivan admitted he used a Gmail account from time to time but insisted he did not send classified information to Hillary Clinton’s private email.

Judicial Watch promptly pointed out to Mr. Sullivan that he indeed sent a classified email with the subject line “call sheet.”

https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2019/05...-business/
Sullivan said in the deposition that he had not been concerned about Clinton’s use of a non-government email account, because it was not part of his job:

Like Secretary Clinton has said herself, I wish she had used a State Department account. It wasn’t really part of my job to be thinking about Secretary Clinton’s emails so I don’t think I sort of fell down directly in my job, but do I wish I had thought of it during the time we were at State. Of course. I mean, what human being at this point wouldn’t have thought of that?

Sullivan’s deposition is part of United States District Judge Royce C. Lamberth’s order for senior officials — including Susan Rice, Ben Rhodes, Jacob Sullivan, and FBI official E.W. Priestap – to respond under oath to Judicial Watch questions.

A video of the Sullivan deposition exists but is under seal after the Justice Department and State Department, which opposed any discovery, objected to their public release. The court denied release of the video depositions for now and left the door open for reconsideration.

[T]he Court does not foreclose future releases of audiovisual recordings – in this or other cases. Judicial Watch may move to unseal portions of these recordings relied upon in future court filings. So too may it use the video recordings at trial, consistent with the Federal Rules of Evidence.
Under our current laws the penalty for this is a automatic prison sentence, where is MR. JUSTICE, he went to sleep and has not woke up yet.
I like that guy from Judicial Watch, seems like a smart fellow.
I have seen people go to prison for security crimes that were NOTHING compared to what they did, ie. using the wrong shredder for s or ts documents, yes it takes a special type of shredder to do those. also for going to the bathroom while a classified document was left on your desk instead of back in the safe. under current laws on the books she should be in prison for LIFE, that is FACT.
(05-01-2019, 11:19 PM)Apache54 Wrote: [ -> ]I have seen people go to prison for security crimes that were NOTHING compared to what they did, ie. using the wrong shredder for s or ts documents, yes it takes a special type of shredder to do those. also for going to the bathroom while a classified document was left on your desk instead of back in the safe. under current laws on the books she should be in prison for LIFE, that is FACT.

Yes, they take security very seriously and don't screw around with laxity. Holy crap, didn't someone from the DNC even contact someone from Amazon as to how to bleach bit the servers? Like no security there.
(05-01-2019, 11:19 PM)Apache54 Wrote: [ -> ]I have seen people go to prison for security crimes that were NOTHING compared to what they did, ie. using the wrong shredder for s or ts documents, yes it takes a special type of shredder to do those. also for going to the bathroom while a classified document was left on your desk instead of back in the safe. under current laws on the books she should be in prison for LIFE, that is FACT.

Is there something better than a cross-cut shredder? I have an old coffee or restaurant size fruit can. Anything super critical goes in the can with a match.

When working on some projects, I'll make sketches and drawings, usually in a notebook but, sometime on scraps of paper. I generally tape the scraps into the notebook. No one goes into my work room unless I'm in the room.

I haven't lost anything recently. A few years back, some students belonging to my pal, who I share work space with, went through my desk and files. It was very obvious, they left a big mess. He allowed them in our offices to look at some art on the office walls. I was out of town and didn't find the crime until I returned. I don't leave things out at work. I don't know what they got. I had optical copies of lots of my work in the desk but, no written inventory. Fuckin rich millennial art students. The school is $50-60k/year, plus housing in SF.
Multiple felonies in each case.

Public trust is at stake. If they get away with criminality why shouldn't we?
(05-01-2019, 11:19 PM)Apache54 Wrote: [ -> ]I have seen people go to prison for security crimes that were NOTHING compared to what they did, ie. using the wrong shredder for s or ts documents, yes it takes a special type of shredder to do those. also for going to the bathroom while a classified document was left on your desk instead of back in the safe. under current laws on the books she should be in prison for LIFE, that is FACT.

SF312

[Image: giphy-22.gif]
(05-01-2019, 11:52 PM)MaximalGravity Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-01-2019, 11:19 PM)Apache54 Wrote: [ -> ]I have seen people go to prison for security crimes that were NOTHING compared to what they did, ie. using the wrong shredder for s or ts documents, yes it takes a special type of shredder to do those. also for going to the bathroom while a classified document was left on your desk instead of back in the safe. under current laws on the books she should be in prison for LIFE, that is FACT.

Is there something better than a cross-cut shredder? I have an old coffee or restaurant size fruit can. Anything super critical goes in the can with a match.

When working on some projects, I'll make sketches and drawings, usually in a notebook but, sometime on scraps of paper. I generally tape the scraps into the notebook. No one goes into my work room unless I'm in the room.

I haven't lost anything recently. A few years back, some students belonging to my pal, who I share work space with, went through my desk and files. It was very obvious, they left a big mess. He allowed them in our offices to look at some art on the office walls. I was out of town and didn't find the crime until I returned. I don't leave things out at work. I don't know what they got. I had optical copies of lots of my work in the desk but, no written inventory. Fuckin rich millennial art students. The school is $50-60k/year, plus housing in SF.

Yes here is a article with the newer requirements for paper shredders for high security shredding, they have a specific pattern and paper particle sizing. most are still a cross-cut style.
Shred Particle Security Levels

Shredders are graded on security based on the size of the shred particles created once a document has been shredded. There are six security levels that shredders can be grouped into, with level 1 being the lowest security level and level 6 being the highest. Both the cut type and the dimensions of individual shredded pieces are taken into consideration when determining a shredder's security level; shred particle size decreases with each level, and strip cut shredders cannot have a security level higher than 3.

NSA and CSS Requirements

The National Security Agency and Central Security Services deal with highly classified documents on a regular basis. Because of the highly sensitive nature of the documents that pass through the NSA and CSS, any document that is shredded or otherwise destroyed must be rendered unrecoverable by the process. NSA/CSS Specification 02-01 details the requirements that a shredder must meet to render a document unrecoverable by NSA and CSS standards. The resulting shred particles are small enough that no distinct characters can be made out, making it impossible to piece the document back together.

Level 6 Shredding

Only shredders with a security level 6 rating meet the requirements of NSA/CSS Specification 02-01 and are classified as being NSA/CSS approved. Shred particles generated by these shredders have an area equal to or smaller than approximately 1/32” x 5/32” or 1mm x 5mm. Some shredders use an alternate cut pattern that generates particles with an area equal to 1/26” x 1/5”, which is still acceptable for level 6 classification and NSA/CSS approval.
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