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I was trained as a Lifeguard, but never knew this!!



"Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning

The new captain jumped from the deck, fully dressed, and sprinted through the water. A former lifeguard, he kept his eyes on his victim and headed straight for a couple who were swimming between their anchored sportfish and the beach. “I think he thinks you’re drowning,” the husband said to his wife. They had been splashing each other, and she had screamed, but now they were just standing neck-deep on a sandbar. “We’re fine, what is he doing?” she asked, a little annoyed. “We’re fine!” the husband yelled, waving him off, but his captain kept swimming hard toward him. “Move!” he barked as he sprinted between the stunned owners. Directly behind them, not 10 feet away, their nine-year-old daughter was drowning. Safely above the surface in the arms of the captain, she burst into tears and screamed, “Daddy!”

How did this captain know — from 50 feet away — what the father couldn’t recognize from just 10? Drowning is not the violent, splashing call for help that most people expect. The captain was trained to recognize drowning by experts and years of experience. The father, on the other hand, learned what drowning looks like by watching television.

If you spend time on or near the water (hint: that’s all of us), then you should make sure that you and your crew know what to look for when people enter the water. Until she cried a tearful, “Daddy,” the owner’s daughter hadn’t made a sound. As a former Coast Guard rescue swimmer, I wasn’t surprised at all by this story. Drowning is almost always a deceptively quiet event. The waving, splashing and yelling that dramatic conditioning (television) prepares us to look for is rarely seen in real life.

[Image: drowning2.jpg]
Mario Vittone

The Instinctive Drowning Response, so named by Francesco A. Pia, Ph.D., is what people do to avoid actual or perceived suffocation in the water. And it does not look like most people expect it to. When someone is drowning there is very little splashing, and no waving or yelling or calling for help of any kind. To get an idea of just how quiet and undramatic drowning can be, consider this: It is the number two cause of accidental death in children age 15 and under (just behind vehicle accidents). Of the approximately 750 children who will drown next year, about 375 of them will do so within 25 yards of a parent or other adult. In 10 percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch them do it, having no idea it is happening.

Drowning does not look like drowning. Dr. Pia, in an article he wrote for the Coast Guard’s On Scene magazine, described the instinctive drowning response like this:

• Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is a secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled before speech occurs.  

• Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water. . . . "

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(04-30-2019, 12:48 PM)SouthernBelle Wrote: [ -> ]I was trained as a Lifeguard, but never knew this!!



"Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning

The new captain jumped from the deck, fully dressed, and sprinted through the water. A former lifeguard, he kept his eyes on his victim and headed straight for a couple who were swimming between their anchored sportfish and the beach. “I think he thinks you’re drowning,” the husband said to his wife. They had been splashing each other, and she had screamed, but now they were just standing neck-deep on a sandbar. “We’re fine, what is he doing?” she asked, a little annoyed. “We’re fine!” the husband yelled, waving him off, but his captain kept swimming hard toward him. “Move!” he barked as he sprinted between the stunned owners. Directly behind them, not 10 feet away, their nine-year-old daughter was drowning. Safely above the surface in the arms of the captain, she burst into tears and screamed, “Daddy!”

How did this captain know — from 50 feet away — what the father couldn’t recognize from just 10? Drowning is not the violent, splashing call for help that most people expect. The captain was trained to recognize drowning by experts and years of experience. The father, on the other hand, learned what drowning looks like by watching television.

If you spend time on or near the water (hint: that’s all of us), then you should make sure that you and your crew know what to look for when people enter the water. Until she cried a tearful, “Daddy,” the owner’s daughter hadn’t made a sound. As a former Coast Guard rescue swimmer, I wasn’t surprised at all by this story. Drowning is almost always a deceptively quiet event. The waving, splashing and yelling that dramatic conditioning (television) prepares us to look for is rarely seen in real life.

[Image: drowning2.jpg]
Mario Vittone

The Instinctive Drowning Response, so named by Francesco A. Pia, Ph.D., is what people do to avoid actual or perceived suffocation in the water. And it does not look like most people expect it to. When someone is drowning there is very little splashing, and no waving or yelling or calling for help of any kind. To get an idea of just how quiet and undramatic drowning can be, consider this: It is the number two cause of accidental death in children age 15 and under (just behind vehicle accidents). Of the approximately 750 children who will drown next year, about 375 of them will do so within 25 yards of a parent or other adult. In 10 percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch them do it, having no idea it is happening.

Drowning does not look like drowning. Dr. Pia, in an article he wrote for the Coast Guard’s On Scene magazine, described the instinctive drowning response like this:

• Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is a secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled before speech occurs.  

• Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.  . . . "

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Great article,

~mc~

pinned per request
Good info for summer lake fun.
Stay alert, save a life.
Always happens when people get to comfy. Mix in some booze and you have a tragedy waiting to happen.
(04-30-2019, 01:04 PM)~mc~ Wrote: [ -> ]pinned per request

Thank you for the Pin! Hoping this helps prevent a tragedy!

Heartflowers
Good grief, and wow! I had no idea!
Thanks, SB for this article! Heartflowers
@SouthernBelle

Having worked around a bit of TV filming, I can tell you that writers and directors often have no knowledge of the stuff they are portraying. And, they and their research staff won't research anything unless faced with legal trouble.

Almost everything is exaggerated for viewers. And, demographics show that most viewers are dumb as stumps. Have you noticed that, both TV and Radio spots have become less entertaining and more hard sell over the last 10-15 years. It's because audiences have become dumber.

Most advertising is targeted at adults between the ages of 18-45, and, Millennials are a really stupid bunch - or commercial content would reflect otherwise.
So, unless they are black, watch their ass / hips. If the hips go below the shoulder, they aren't moving forward. Fatigue will happen if they don't get momentum. Black people have heavy legs and when they "swim" it usually looks like drowning. Make sure to keep an accurate count of all black people in water over their heads. This will keep your eyes scanning. I used to lifeguard ghetto pools. Urban summer daycare. Pools are usually 3- 5 foot deep (so people can stand). The diving part is deeper, and you can watch little black kids do the most acrobatic springboard stuff, then drown all the way to the ladder. Brown and tan kids do crappier dives but take half the time or less getting to the ladder to get back in line. Watch the shoulder and hips even treading water your hips are a little back
(04-30-2019, 02:47 PM)Danno512 Wrote: [ -> ]So, unless they are black, watch their ass / hips. If the hips go below the shoulder, they aren't moving forward. Fatigue will happen if they don't get momentum. Black people have heavy legs and when they "swim" it usually looks like drowning. Make sure to keep an accurate count of all black people in water over their heads. This will keep your eyes scanning.  I used to lifeguard ghetto pools. Urban summer daycare. Pools are usually 3- 5 foot deep (so people can stand). The diving part is deeper, and you can watch little black kids do the most acrobatic springboard stuff, then drown all the way to the ladder. Brown and tan kids do crappier dives but take half the time or less getting to the ladder to get back in line. Watch the shoulder and hips even treading water your hips are a little back

I'm sorry but I can't make out what you are trying to say; it's confusing.

Try again?
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