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Full Version: Israel moon landing: Spacecraft mission ends in crash
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Israel's Beresheet would have been the most unlikely lunar lander in history, but the spacecraft didn't survive its reach for the moon's surface Thursday.
SpaceIL's live broadcast followed the tense maneuvers needed to get the lunar lander down to the Sea of Serenity on the near side of the moon. The Beresheet team members worked in the control room as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu watched from a spectator area.
The landing process suffered some glitches when the main engine cut out and mission control lost communication. The disappointed team reacted calmly to the failure.

The failed mission will be remembered as bittersweet.
"Well, we didn't make it, but we definitely tried, and the achievement of getting where we got is really tremendous," said Morris Khan, an Israeli entrepreneur who provided a large portion of the funding for Beresheet, as he addressed the observers near the control room. "We can be proud."
NASA commended the mission in a tweet: "We congratulate SpaceIL, Israel Aerospace Industries and the state of Israel on the accomplishment of sending the first privately funded mission into lunar orbit." Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 pilot, also had kind words. "Never lose hope. Your hard work, teamwork, and innovation is inspiring to all," he tweeted.

This was a mission of firsts. Beresheet was to be Israel's first moon lander, which would have put the country in an exclusive club that includes the US, Soviet Union and China. In addition, nonprofit SpaceIL would have been the first private, nongovernment group to set a lander on the moon's surface.

Cite: https://www.cnet.com/news/israels-beresh...h-a-crash/
A long road to the moon
Beresheet's story begins in 2011, when the nonprofit organization SpaceIL formed to compete in the Google Lunar X Prize. The GLXP offered $20 million to the first privately funded team to put a robot down softly on the moon, move it at least 1,650 feet (500 meters) on the lunar surface and have it send high-resolution imagery home to Earth.
The runner-up would pocket $5 million. An additional $5 million was available for various special accomplishments, bringing the contest's total purse to $30 million.

The competition ended last year without a winner, but SpaceIL and IAI, the country's biggest aerospace and defense company, continued working on the 5-foot-tall (1.5 meters) Beresheet. (Some other former GLXP teams, such as Florida-based Moon Express, have kept going as well.)
Last month, the X Prize Foundation announced that SpaceIL could win a special $1 million Moonshot Award if Beresheet successfully landed on the lunar surface. Just minutes after the moon crash, X Prize founder and Executive Chairman Peter Diamandis and CEO Anousheh Ansari said SpaceIL and IAI will receive the award despite failing to land.
"I think they managed to touch the surface of the moon, and that's what we were looking for for our Moonshot Award," Ansari said.
"And also, besides touching the surface of the moon, they touched the lives and the hearts of an entire nation, an entire world, schoolkids around the world," Diamandis said.
XPRIZE to award $1 Million Moonshot Award to SpaceIL team for them to continue their work and pursue Beresheet 2.0. Space is hard!!!

The lander launched on the night of Feb. 21, soaring into Earth orbit atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Beresheet continued looping around our planet for the next six weeks, performing engine burns now and again to push its elliptical orbit closer and closer to the moon.
Beresheet ended up covering about 4 million miles (6.5 million kilometers) during this phase of the mission, team members said. No other spacecraft has taken such a long road to the moon.
Beresheet's slow-and-steady strategy paid off on April 4, when the moon's gravity captured the lander. Beresheet then lowered its lunar orbit via a series of burns, the last of which occurred yesterday (April 10). That 32-second maneuver shifted the spacecraft into a highly elliptical orbit with a closest lunar approach of just 9 to 10 miles (15 to 17 kilometers) and a most-distant point 125 miles (200 km) from the gray dirt, mission team members said.

Cite: https://www.space.com/israeli-beresheet-...fails.html
So, now they have littered on the moon.

I don't like humans.
(04-12-2019, 10:45 AM)PickleSnout Wrote: [ -> ]So, now they have littered on the moon.

I don't like humans.

You should see what is orbiting around earth, and they are concerned about it, that means it is bad.
Beresheet = In The Beginning . . . failure it seems .

Das ist Bescheuert . . .

Gai Kukken Afen Yam .


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So what exactly is Israel's concern with the moon and what do they wanna find???

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Hiding3 Just saying!

Jptdknpa
(04-12-2019, 04:37 PM)Papa Clutch Wrote: [ -> ]So what exactly is Israel's concern with the moon and what do they wanna find???

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Hiding3 Just saying!

Jptdknpa

Thats some funny stuff @Papa Clutch , you know from what I read, it didn't look like they were looking for anything in particular, they just wanted to land there for the prestige of joining the United States, China and Russia as being a country that landed on the moon. Unfortunately the ship crashed.
(04-12-2019, 04:37 PM)Papa Clutch Wrote: [ -> ]So what exactly is Israel's concern with the moon and what do they wanna find???

Advertising Revenue ? 1dunno1


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"The lander launched on the night of Feb. 21, soaring into Earth orbit atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket."

So it wouldn't have technically been an Israel moon landing, more like an Israeli rover hoping a ride on an American Space platform.
(04-12-2019, 06:04 PM)Deplorably Nameless Wrote: [ -> ]"The lander launched on the night of Feb. 21, soaring into Earth orbit atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket."

So it wouldn't have technically been an Israel moon landing, more like an Israeli rover hoping a ride on an American Space platform.

That is true, but they probably paid for that Falcon rocket so they think, well it was our money so its our prestige. You know I find that Elon Musk really interesting, cause he is clever and he tries to do big projects that will change things for mankind. The Securities people are after him cause he kind of makes these flip statements, but probably in his mind they are true, about where the company is going. But that guy is like, high risk, high tech. I saw a picture of him as a youth, seems he was quite clever even then.