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Description of Dighton Rock
The Dighton Rock is a 40-ton boulder that arrived to the Taunton River during the melting of the glaciers during the last ice age. It measures 5 feet (1.5 meters) high, 9.5 feet (2.9 meters) wide, and 11 feet (3.4 meters) long, and is made of gray-brown crystalline sandstone.
What has drawn attention about the great boulder is not the size, but the petroglyphs across one of its six sides. These carvings have been the inspiration for over 1000 books and articles, and the basis for over 35 hypotheses.  Although no one can say for certain who was/were the maker(s) of the inscriptions on the petroglyph, it has been agreed that they certainly are very old and very real.

[Image: Dighton-Rock-Photograph-1070x640.jpg]

Early History of Dighton Rock
Many scholars say that the mystery of Dighton rock began in 1680, when Reverend John Danforth visited the rock. After seeing it, he decided that the carvings on it were made by Native Americans (the Wampanoag Indians to be exact), and told the tale of a ship arriving, then the battle between the locals and the newcomers. Danforth drew the symbols visible on the top half of the petroglyph (possibly because the rest was under tidal water while he worked) and then wrote:
“It is reported from the tradition of the old Indians, that there came a wooden house (and men of another country in it) swimming up the river Assonet, that fought the Indians and slew their Sachem. Some interpret the figures to be hieroglyphical. The first figure representing a ship, without mast, and meer (mere) wrack cast upon the Shoales. The second representing a head of land, possibly a cape with a peninsula. Hence a golf.”
Danforth’s drawing was requested by the Royal Society of London in 1732 and is now preserved in the British Museum.

https://www.ancient-origins.net/unexplai...ock-004991

As far back as 1783, people were making wild accusations about the origins of the rock. Congregationalist minister and academic Ezrz Stiles was convinced the rock was made by Ancient Phoenicians. This gave way to speculations that the Norse did it, then that early Portuguese explorers carved it (possible), and most recently (and most unlikely) that the Chinese did it, proposed in the 2002 book “1421: The Year China Discovered America” which proposes the Chinese got here 70 years before Columbus.
Despite a few hundred years of speculation, the extensive petroglyphs on the rock have still not been explained conclusively. The most likely hypotheses attribute them to Native Americans or to the Portuguese explorer Miguel Cortereal. Proponents of pre-Columbian exploration of the Americas by Vikings, Phoenicians, and so forth, continue to claim these inscriptions as evidence.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/dighton-rock

In 1807, Samuel Harris, a Harvard scholar, claimed that he had deciphered three ancient Hebrew words in Phoenician lettering — “king,” “priest” and “idol.”

In 1831, Ira Hill, a schoolteacher from Maryland, claimed he had deduced from the Old Testament that the rock was engraved “in the second month in the tenth year of the reign of King Solomon by an expedition of Tyrians and Jews …”

[Image: 12783021033_05d2ba5f94_n.jpg]

"Among the other Curiosities of New-England, one is that of a mighty Rock, on a perpendicular side whereof by a River, which at High Tide covers part of it, there are very deeply Engraved, no man alive knows How or When about half a score Lines, near Ten Foot Long, and a foot and half broad, filled with strange Characters: which would suggest as odd Thoughts about them that were here before us, as there are odd Shapes in that Elaborate Monument.."
Over the last three centuries, people were making a series of accusations about the origins of the rock. More than 20 theories have been proposed about its origins Ezra Stiles (1727 -1795), an American academic, theologian and author, was convinced the rock was carved by ancient Phoenicians.
Some speculated that the Vikings or Native Americans did it; others credited early Portuguese explorers with the Dighton Rock inscription.
In 1784, Count Antoine Court de Gobelin, a French nobleman suggested that Dighton Rock commemorated a visit to the Massachusetts shore “in very ancient times” by a group of sailors from Carthage, on the shores of the Mediterranean.

http://www.ancientpages.com/2015/09/08/d...-unsolved/

As far back as 1783, people were making wild accusations about the origins of the rock. Congregationalist minister and academic Ezrz Stiles was convinced the rock was made by Ancient Phoenicians. This gave way to speculations that the Norse did it, then that early Portuguese explorers carved it (possible), and most recently (and most unlikely) that the Chinese did it, proposed in the 2002 book “1421: The Year China Discovered America” which proposes the Chinese got here 70 years before Columbus.
Despite a few hundred years of speculation, the extensive petroglyphs on the rock have still not been explained conclusively. The most likely hypotheses attribute them to Native Americans or to the Portuguese explorer Miguel Cortereal. Proponents of pre-Columbian exploration of the Americas by Vikings, Phoenicians, and so forth, continue to claim these inscriptions as evidence.
Dighton Rock has been moved from its original location at the waterline of the nearby Taunton River, to a tiny museum in Dighton Rock State Park.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/dighton-rock
(02-17-2019, 08:29 PM)sivil Wrote: [ -> ]



Description of Dighton Rock
The Dighton Rock is a 40-ton boulder that arrived to the Taunton River during the melting of the glaciers during the last ice age. It measures 5 feet (1.5 meters) high, 9.5 feet (2.9 meters) wide, and 11 feet (3.4 meters) long, and is made of gray-brown crystalline sandstone.
What has drawn attention about the great boulder is not the size, but the petroglyphs across one of its six sides. These carvings have been the inspiration for over 1000 books and articles, and the basis for over 35 hypotheses.  Although no one can say for certain who was/were the maker(s) of the inscriptions on the petroglyph, it has been agreed that they certainly are very old and very real.

[Image: Dighton-Rock-Photograph-1070x640.jpg]

Early History of Dighton Rock
Many scholars say that the mystery of Dighton rock began in 1680, when Reverend John Danforth visited the rock. After seeing it, he decided that the carvings on it were made by Native Americans (the Wampanoag Indians to be exact), and told the tale of a ship arriving, then the battle between the locals and the newcomers. Danforth drew the symbols visible on the top half of the petroglyph (possibly because the rest was under tidal water while he worked) and then wrote:
“It is reported from the tradition of the old Indians, that there came a wooden house (and men of another country in it) swimming up the river Assonet, that fought the Indians and slew their Sachem. Some interpret the figures to be hieroglyphical. The first figure representing a ship, without mast, and meer (mere) wrack cast upon the Shoales. The second representing a head of land, possibly a cape with a peninsula. Hence a golf.”
Danforth’s drawing was requested by the Royal Society of London in 1732 and is now preserved in the British Museum.

https://www.ancient-origins.net/unexplai...ock-004991

As far back as 1783, people were making wild accusations about the origins of the rock. Congregationalist minister and academic Ezrz Stiles was convinced the rock was made by Ancient Phoenicians. This gave way to speculations that the Norse did it, then that early Portuguese explorers carved it (possible), and most recently (and most unlikely) that the Chinese did it, proposed in the 2002 book “1421: The Year China Discovered America” which proposes the Chinese got here 70 years before Columbus.
Despite a few hundred years of speculation, the extensive petroglyphs on the rock have still not been explained conclusively. The most likely hypotheses attribute them to Native Americans or to the Portuguese explorer Miguel Cortereal. Proponents of pre-Columbian exploration of the Americas by Vikings, Phoenicians, and so forth, continue to claim these inscriptions as evidence.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/dighton-rock

In 1807, Samuel Harris, a Harvard scholar, claimed that he had deciphered three ancient Hebrew words in Phoenician lettering — “king,” “priest” and “idol.”

In 1831, Ira Hill, a schoolteacher from Maryland, claimed he had deduced from the Old Testament that the rock was engraved “in the second month in the tenth year of the reign of King Solomon by an expedition of Tyrians and Jews …”

[Image: 12783021033_05d2ba5f94_n.jpg]

"Among the other Curiosities of New-England, one is that of a mighty Rock, on a perpendicular side whereof by a River, which at High Tide covers part of it, there are very deeply Engraved, no man alive knows How or When about half a score Lines, near Ten Foot Long, and a foot and half broad, filled with strange Characters: which would suggest as odd Thoughts about them that were here before us, as there are odd Shapes in that Elaborate Monument.."
Over the last three centuries, people were making a series of accusations about the origins of the rock. More than 20 theories have been proposed about its origins Ezra Stiles (1727 -1795), an American academic, theologian and author, was convinced the rock was carved by ancient Phoenicians.
Some speculated that the Vikings or Native Americans did it; others credited early Portuguese explorers with the Dighton Rock inscription.
In 1784, Count Antoine Court de Gobelin, a French nobleman suggested that Dighton Rock commemorated a visit to the Massachusetts shore “in very ancient times” by a group of sailors from Carthage, on the shores of the Mediterranean.

http://www.ancientpages.com/2015/09/08/d...-unsolved/

As far back as 1783, people were making wild accusations about the origins of the rock. Congregationalist minister and academic Ezrz Stiles was convinced the rock was made by Ancient Phoenicians. This gave way to speculations that the Norse did it, then that early Portuguese explorers carved it (possible), and most recently (and most unlikely) that the Chinese did it, proposed in the 2002 book “1421: The Year China Discovered America” which proposes the Chinese got here 70 years before Columbus.
Despite a few hundred years of speculation, the extensive petroglyphs on the rock have still not been explained conclusively. The most likely hypotheses attribute them to Native Americans or to the Portuguese explorer Miguel Cortereal. Proponents of pre-Columbian exploration of the Americas by Vikings, Phoenicians, and so forth, continue to claim these inscriptions as evidence.
Dighton Rock has been moved from its original location at the waterline of the nearby Taunton River, to a tiny museum in Dighton Rock State Park.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/dighton-rock

this is 5 min from my parents house/ Heartflowers
@Nekro

Wow that is really cool!
(02-17-2019, 08:56 PM)sivil Wrote: [ -> ]@Nekro

Wow that is really cool!

we had so many parties in dighton rock park all through high school.
its not even in dighton ma its in berkley, ma.
So you got to see the rock then @Nekro? I wonder if its protected.
(02-17-2019, 09:01 PM)sivil Wrote: [ -> ]So you got to see the rock then @Nekro?  I wonder if its protected.

yeah its been about 30 years since ive been there