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Genetic DNA test, also known as genealogical DNA test, is a test which is conducted to examine nucleotides that are present at specific locations of a person’s DNA. It is conducted for genetic genealogy purposes which is a test to determine the level of genetic relationships between humans. In short, it means that this test can help you find out not only who you belong to but also where you belong from. Ready to use DNA kits are available at pharmacies, which consist of a cheek swab to collect sample of cells from the inside of one’s mouth. These cells are used to determine DNA of the specific individual, and then the result is matched with other samples that are generally obtained from deceased people. The Y-chromosome test is one of the most common tests used for genealogical DNA determination. This test is conducted only with the male species as the Y chromosome is found only in men and can be passed on from father to son. Women who want this test conducted need to request their father, brother or any other male relative in their family. These tests can be carried out at home but the samples need to be sent to special laboratories.
Genetic DNA Testing Reasons
DNA genetic test is conducted mainly for determining genetic relationships between individuals. This could include revealing the family tree and also the history of the ethnicity of one’s forefathers. It can also be used for medical needs where a health condition that has been passed on to an individual can be determined. Even genetic problems that require special care can be identified with this test.

http://www.medicalhealthtests.com/geneti...sting.html


Best DNA Testing Kits of 2019 can be found here:

https://www.pcmag.com/roundup/356975/the...sting-kits

Genetic ancestry testing, or genetic genealogy, is a way for people interested in family history (genealogy) to go beyond what they can learn from relatives or from historical documentation. Examination of DNA variations can provide clues about where a person's ancestors might have come from and about relationships between families. Certain patterns of genetic variation are often shared among people of particular backgrounds. The more closely related two individuals, families, or populations are, the more patterns of variation they typically share.
Three types of genetic ancestry testing are commonly used for genealogy:
Y chromosome testing
Variations in the Y chromosome, passed exclusively from father to son, can be used to explore ancestry in the direct male line. Y chromosome testing can only be done on males, because females do not have a Y chromosome. However, women interested in this type of genetic testing sometimes recruit a male relative to have the test done. Because the Y chromosome is passed on in the same pattern as are family names in many cultures, Y chromosome testing is often used to investigate questions such as whether two families with the same surname are related.
Mitochondrial DNA testing
This type of testing identifies genetic variations in mitochondrial DNA. Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within the cell nucleus, cell structures called mitochondria also have a small amount of their own DNA (known as mitochondrial DNA). Both males and females have mitochondrial DNA, which is passed on from their mothers, so this type of testing can be used by either sex. It provides information about the direct female ancestral line. Mitochondrial DNA testing can be useful for genealogy because it preserves information about female ancestors that may be lost from the historical record because of the way surnames are often passed down.
Single nucleotide polymorphism testing
These tests evaluate large numbers of variations (single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs) across a person’s entire genome. The results are compared with those of others who have taken the tests to provide an estimate of a person's ethnic background. For example, the pattern of SNPs might indicate that a person's ancestry is approximately 50 percent African, 25 percent European, 20 percent Asian, and 5 percent unknown. Genealogists use this type of test because Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA test results, which represent only single ancestral lines, do not capture the overall ethnic background of an individual.
Genetic ancestry testing has a number of limitations. Test providers compare individuals' test results to different databases of previous tests, so ethnicity estimates may not be consistent from one provider to another. Also, because most human populations have migrated many times throughout their history and mixed with nearby groups, ethnicity estimates based on genetic testing may differ from an individual's expectations. In ethnic groups with a smaller range of genetic variation due to the group's size and history, most members share many SNPs, and it may be difficult to distinguish people who have a relatively recent common ancestor, such as fourth cousins, from the group as a whole.
Genetic ancestry testing is offered by several companies and organizations. Most companies provide online forums and other services to allow people who have been tested to share and discuss their results with others, which may allow them to discover previously unknown relationships. On a larger scale, combined genetic ancestry test results from many people can be used by scientists to explore the history of populations as they arose, migrated, and mixed with other groups.

https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/primer/dtcgeneti...trytesting
Now here is the conspiracy part, people who have done these dna tests have been arrested for murder.

Companies such as Ancestry. Com and 23andMe are online genealogy tracing services which allow their customers to connect themselves to their family trees and discover where their ancestors came from. In the past few years, these services have expanded to include DNA testing and analysis in order to allow people who use their sites to more accurately pinpoint their genetic origins.
At the time that this kind of service was becoming popular amongst curious genealogy enthusiasts, genetic privacy advocates were expressing serious misgivings about potential unintended consequences. One such expert, Jeremy Gruber, said that customers should exercise caution when choosing to share such sensitive data with private companies and reminding them that their genetic material contained important information about themselves and their families.
While the companies involved claimed that they would resist any attempts for others to gain access to their databases, it wasn’t very long before law enforcement came knocking, keen to exploit these private genetic databases.

https://www.disclose.tv/dna-sample-given...ase-310552

Man became suspect in murder and rape case after DNA his father donated to Mormon genetic research was sold to Ancestry.com and then tested by police
Michael Usry donated DNA to Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation
The database, backed by Mormon church to find a 'genetic blueprint' for humans was later acquired by Ancestry.com
Police were investigating the murder and rape of teenager Angie Dodge
Christopher Tapp was already convicted but his DNA did not match the sample left on Dodge's body in 1996
Idaho Falls Police Department had warrant to seize Ancestry.com info, which found Usry a 'familial match'
The search only matches certain parts of genetic code, leading to 'high rate of false positives'
Usry did not fit the age range of the suspect, so his son, Michael Usry Jr. became a suspect until he was cleared a month later

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article...bases.html
Americans curious whether any of their ancestors may have come over on the Mayflower or signed the Declaration of Independence should consider the legal nightmare a genetic database owned by the genealogical website Ancestry.com created for a New Orleans man.
Someone else’s DNA sample, a few Facebook friends who lived over 1,500 miles away, a few award-winning films that included murder as a theme and a website that violated its own privacy guidelines became the perfect storm for filmmaker Michael Usry Jr., making him a murder suspect, reported the Electronic Frontier Foundation.
Usry’s problems begin in 1996 when a young woman named Nancy Dodge was murdered in a small Idaho town. Despite collecting semen from the crime scene, police were unable to match the DNA of the likely suspect to anyone in any criminal database, resulting in the case going cold until last year.
Investigators reopened the case by casting a wider genetic net, testing the sample in their files to identify familial connections to the suspected killer. Using a lab linked to a publicly accessible genetic-genealogical database called the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation Database, owned by Ancestry.com since 2012, a DNA profile that included YSTR and mtDNA – two genetic markers used to identify patrilineal and matrilineal relationships – was extracted.
With more than 100,000 DNA samples and documented multi-generational family histories from “volunteers in more than 100 countries,” Sorenson bills itself as the “the foremost collection of genetic-genealogy data in the world.” Those volunteers, many of which were Mormons, were promised by Sorenson that submitted DNA would be used only for “genealogical services, including the determination of family-migration patterns and geographic origins,” and the profiles would be assigned “protected” names to assure anonymity and would not be shared with outsiders.

https://www.wnd.com/2015/05/ancestry-com...th-police/
It is also said that China also owns some of the information already stored in these databases. If true, why would a nation want access to the genomic information of a given population unless it intends to exploit said information in some manner? Just an opinion.

Great post, sivil!
(02-09-2019, 04:14 PM)The Order of Chaos Wrote: [ -> ]It is also said that China also owns some of the information already stored in these databases. If true, why would a nation want access to the genomic information of a given population unless it intends to exploit said information in some manner? Just an opinion.  

Great post, sivil!

I think you are right, they want to use this information in the future for a purpose. Maybe they are going to create a society with all the best attributes. I guess that CRISPR gene editing tool doesn't work though, just causes so much dna damage. But they probably have something else.
(02-09-2019, 04:28 PM)sivil Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-09-2019, 04:14 PM)The Order of Chaos Wrote: [ -> ]It is also said that China also owns some of the information already stored in these databases. If true, why would a nation want access to the genomic information of a given population unless it intends to exploit said information in some manner? Just an opinion.  

Great post, sivil!

I think you are right, they want to use this information in the future for a purpose.  Maybe they are going to create a society with all the best attributes.  I guess that CRISPR gene editing tool doesn't work though, just causes so much dna damage.  But they probably have something else.

(Nods) Very good point.

I've seen online suspicions of targeted viral targets...spooky.
But the fact that these ancestory sites who do dna tests are sharing information makes me wonder if they are building a huge database.
(02-09-2019, 05:10 PM)sivil Wrote: [ -> ]But the fact that these ancestory sites who do dna tests are sharing information makes me wonder if they are building a huge database.

They are, that's known. And there's a risk they'll sell to the insurance companies if they aren't already, meaning the insurers can now say "No coverage for you because you might develop this disease as indicated by your genetic profile."

Real life Gattaca.

A few years ago, these databases were put to the test, and triplets were used. Results in some cases came back indicating triplets had different genetic profiles from each other, supposedly.
(02-09-2019, 05:20 PM)The Order of Chaos Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-09-2019, 05:10 PM)sivil Wrote: [ -> ]But the fact that these ancestory sites who do dna tests are sharing information makes me wonder if they are building a huge database.

They are, that's known. And there's a risk they'll sell to the insurance companies if they aren't already, meaning the insurers can now say "No coverage for you because you might develop this disease as indicated by your genetic profile."

Real life Gattaca.  

A few years ago, these databases were put to the test, and triplets were used. Results in some cases came back indicating triplets had different genetic profiles from each other, supposedly.

Man its not even worth it to get tested. Even if your curious I think it might be good to give personal genetic testing a pass.

I remember that movie Gattaca, that was a good movie. Maybe in the future they will try to wipe out Bipolar disorder.
At birth, I was given two surnames, my mother's and my father's. However, both names bear no relations to my true family tree, as my mother was given a completely different family name than her genuine father. Whereas on my father's side our name was given to us by English representants of the crown during the colonial times.

As a student of history, I've always been driven by a natural curiosity to get to know a little more about my ancestors and my true lineage, and a DNA sample would be the easiest and most convenient way to do so. But to be honest, I appreciate the anonymity.

So to make a long story short, stay away from that shit! I think this thread serves as great proof, and it's not that important anyways. Yeah3
(02-09-2019, 04:14 PM)The Order of Chaos Wrote: [ -> ]It is also said that China also owns some of the information already stored in these databases. If true, why would a nation want access to the genomic information of a given population unless it intends to exploit said information in some manner? Just an opinion.  

Great post, sivil!

Panda Blood.
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