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Full Version: Lost city of Heracleion found, underwater
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That is really incredible, there is lots of cool stuff under water that I'm sure we haven't even seen yet. We have barely explored our oceans and seas. Thanks for posting!

Full Throttle

Awesome!! Heartflowers
I love this stuff...thanks....

Full Throttle

@Miscellaneous Thank you so much for this!! The pics are STUNNING!!!

It made logging in here today well worth my time. Heartflowers
Excellent find OP. Just think of what they will find when they start digging deeper.
Wow.

Some of that stuff seems almost too well preserved!
Amazing. And what gorgeous artifacts! Thank you for posting this.
Heracleion

Heracleion (Greek: Ἡράκλειον), also known by its Egyptian name Thonis (Θῶνις) and sometimes called Thonis-Heracleion, was an ancient Egyptian city located near the Canopic Mouth of the Nile, about 32 km northeast of Alexandria. Its ruins are located in Abu Qir Bay, currently 2.5 km off the coast, under 10 m (30 ft) of water.[1] A stele found on the site indicates that it was one single city known by both its Egyptian and Greek names.[2] Its legendary beginnings go back to as early as the 12th century BC, and it is mentioned by ancient Greek historians. Its importance grew particularly during the waning days of the Pharaohs.[3]

Heracleion was originally built on some adjoining islands in the Nile Delta. It was intersected by canals[3] with a number of harbors and anchorages. Its wharves, temples and tower-houses were linked by ferries, bridges, and pontoons. The city was an emporion (trading port)[2] and in the Late Period of ancient Egypt it was the country's main port for international trade[3] and collection of taxes. It had a sister city, Naucratis, which was another trading port lying 72 km (45 mi) further up the Nile. Goods were transferred inland via Naucratis, or they were transported via the Western Lake and through a water channel to the nearby town of Canopus for onward distribution.[2]

During the second century BC Alexandria superseded Heracleion as Egypt’s primary port. At the end of the century the soil on which Heracleion was built succumbed to liquefaction and its buildings collapsed into the water. A few residents stayed on during the Roman era and the beginning of Arab rule, but by the end of the eighth century AD what was left of the city had sunk beneath the sea

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heracleion


SO........ At the end of the second century BC the soil on which Heracleion was built succumbed to liquefaction and its buildings collapsed into the water. A few residents stayed on during the Roman era and the beginning of Arab rule, but by the end of the eighth century AD what was left of the city had sunk beneath the sea.....

30 feet of water is where these items are....so 900 years basically it was below water....plus plus basically 1100 years of contemporary...

so 2000 years...roughly....they look pretty good for being under water for 2000 years


I love these threads that make me think....and make me go look up more...thanks


Sphere Surface Area & Volume Calculator

https://ncalculators.com/area-volume/sph...ulator.htm
(02-08-2019, 01:48 PM)Wingsprint Wrote: [ -> ]I love this stuff...thanks....

Same! +1 and especially, Thanks, misc!
Very cool thread @Miscellaneous!
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