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Marketers Should Know: Halloween Has Become Millennials’ Favorite Holiday

October 31, 2018


BURLINGTON, Vt.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oct 31, 2018--Trends happen across a wide spectrum, from the culturally important to the frivolous. Our survey this month of 2,000 Millennials is about Halloween - which counts as both frivolous and important to marketers. The National Retail Federation is predicting an increase in spending for Halloween this year reaching a record-breaking $9.1 billion. Americans are going to spend more than ever and its Millennials who are leading the way, having made Halloween their favorite holiday.

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The Modern Halloween is for Millennials as Much as Kids Halloween is not just for young trick-or-treaters. According to Alliance Data’s recent #MillennialHalloween Survey, 59% of Millennials plan to either attend or throw a party. 65% say they get their creative inspiration through relevant brand and peer content on social media to help them plan for the perfect Halloween. Retailers can capitalize on this social media-influenced holiday by listening and engaging with their customers and sharing relevant brand-centric content that inspires creativity.

How important is Halloween to Millennials? A whopping 65% of our survey respondents said they‘ll never be too old for Halloween and intend to celebrate “forever.”
https://www.apnews.com/0e308b38ef51485bbf6a0d4febabfa66
"Halloween is blowing up because childhood is leaking further and further into adult life, and millennials in particular aren’t fully sold on the idea that they’re grown-ups. "

Halloween is the new Christmas

http://www.campaignlive.com

Halloween is is full of opportunities for a broader variety of retailers, for a broader variety of reasons, says 22squared's strategy director.
At my house, we have been celebrating Halloween for weeks now. We’ve been working on decorations and costumes (yes, more than one per kid), going to play dates and "trunk or treats" and planning our trick-or-treating route. A one day holiday no longer, it’s a full-on obsession. My pre-school-mom friends start competing for the most-on-trend-yet-kid-friendly family costume. My colleagues are carefully crafting the most unique, chic-but-not-too-sexy costume of the year.

In fact, more and more Americans say Halloween is their favorite holiday, and they spend on it too, with an expected $9 billion in sales in 2017 according to the National Retail Federation. It’s the second favorite holiday (after Christmas) for millennials, according to the Harris Poll.
Right now, expected brands—like Walmart, Target and Mars— invest in Halloween as a key sales driver for the year. Many others participate on the fringes with one to two social posts, but they do not treat Halloween with the same media weight or inspiring creative as they bring for Thanksgiving or Christmas. But Halloween is a beloved consumer holiday and it should be treated that way. It is full of so many opportunities, for an even broader variety of retailers, for a broader variety of reasons. Here are some new approaches to consider:
https://www.campaignlive.com/article/hal...as/1448721


How the millennials ruined Halloween

hotair.com
4 mins read

Kyle Smith at the New York Post gets a bit provocative for the spooky season with a piece titled, Halloween used to be for kids — now it’s for sad millennials. He previews Kurt Andersen’s new book which, in one section, talks about the devaluation of adulthood in America as demonstrated by young adults who still act like children, dressing up in costumes for Halloween.
See Also: The most fun political subplot of the new year: Bernie Sanders fans hating Beto O’Rourke
Speaking as someone who is only four years younger than Andersen and grew up in pretty much the same culture, some of his premises are a bit questionable. He claims that American adults, “never dressed up in costumes, certainly not as an annual ritual.” He then goes on to describe the current trend of costume parties and parades as having been a product of, “freshly out gay people in San Francisco and New York,” practices which were then picked up by straight adults.

Halloween is blowing up because childhood is leaking further and further into adult life, and millennials in particular aren’t fully sold on the idea that they’re grown-ups.

read:https://hotair.com/archives/2017/10/29/millennials-ruined-halloween/
You come across as offended OP.
Did the little Millennials hurt your feelings?

Eat some cement and harden the fuck up.
God damn hypocrites.
One of those idiots was walking down the road in a full sized rabbit costume in the middle of November, her dog was unleashed and I had to slam on the brakes to keep from running it over and the retard just looked at me like nothing was wrong, I layed on the horn because the dog was just standing there and the idiot just stared, totally braindead.
(12-24-2018, 06:36 PM)... Wrote: [ -> ]You come across as offended OP.
Did the little Millennials hurt your feelings?  

Eat some cement and harden the fuck up.
God damn hypocrites.

When they offend me, I fire them. Works every time.

Guest

I recall buying some of my electronics in October. Seemed random. Yet, over a period of time it happened enough to know the difference.

I suspect the deals on electronics has some coefficient, if that's the right word for it, to do with this whole "Millennials: Halloween is now Their Christmas" thingy.




(12-24-2018, 07:34 PM)Screaming_Yellow_Zonkers Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-24-2018, 06:59 PM)Weasel Keeper Wrote: [ -> ]One of those idiots was walking down the road in a full sized rabbit costume in the middle of November, her dog was unleashed and I had to slam on the brakes to keep from running it over and the retard just looked at me like nothing was wrong, I layed on the horn because the dog was just standing there and the idiot just stared, totally braindead.

That sounds like a furry. They're insane

Yep, the furries are getting a huge foothold in the media. Anything for attention and anonymity from the law. Very AntiFa like in some instances.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIS7cOMWbko
(12-24-2018, 07:23 PM)MaximalGravity Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-24-2018, 06:36 PM)... Wrote: [ -> ]You come across as offended OP.
Did the little Millennials hurt your feelings?  

Eat some cement and harden the fuck up.
God damn hypocrites.

When they offend me, I fire them. Works every time.

We will rule the world soon enough.
Millenials will be wiping your ass in a codgers home while you fling profanities at them in vain.
It will be glorious.

Chuckle
(12-24-2018, 07:51 PM)... Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-24-2018, 07:23 PM)MaximalGravity Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-24-2018, 06:36 PM)... Wrote: [ -> ]You come across as offended OP.
Did the little Millennials hurt your feelings?  

Eat some cement and harden the fuck up.
God damn hypocrites.

When they offend me, I fire them. Works every time.

We will rule the world soon enough.
Millenials will be wiping your ass in a codgers home while you fling profanities at them in vain.    
It will be glorious.  

Chuckle

From what I've seen, they won't be running much. Most can't operate the coffee maker at work. They have to find an adult or a 20 year old to make coffee. The few Millennials who are skilled, want nothing to do with the Millennial hordes. They don't like being identified with them and are the first refusing to work with them, when found incompetent. Many Millennials think nothing of exaggerating their abilities. I've come to think they actually believe their own BS.

So, I'm not worried about a bunch of 30 year olds who can't drive a car and make it to work on time, taking over the world. They will all be out dated by robots or, working for the current crop of Freshman Sci Engineering students.
Half of millennials could be competing with robots for jobs

About half of millennials looking for work are interested in jobs that carry a risk of automation, a new study suggests. The findings indicate the youngest and most educated generation in the American workforce isn’t necessarily more robot-proof than older workers, who tend to be portrayed as the primary victims of automation.
“Millennials show a considerable amount of interest in occupations that face a threat of automation,” said Daniel Culbertson, an economist at the Indeed Hiring Lab, the research institute attached to the international job site, and the author of the report.
“That gets lost when people talk about millennials being so highly educated and more interested in tech roles.”
A college degree doesn't protect against robot rivals because even well-paid, highly skilled jobs could shrink or vanish in the near future, he said. Recent graduates who land high salaries aren't impervious if their job is characterized by repetitive tasks and decisions.
More
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk...f645dac2c4
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