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Guest

Have any of you played amateur sleuth to explore possible locations of Forrest Fenn's treasure? I had fun with this last winter, kind of forgot about it until I came across some maps I had saved. I'm not actually going to explore the real world, but I'm still into trying to break down the clues. Last year I had 4 or 5 solid possibilities. But I think all had been explored numerous times...

Anyone?

Guest

Guess not... :(

https://medium.com/@zholmquist/the-spark...bf0fae5095

Quote:In the year 1988 a seemingly unconnected series of events occurred: millions of acres of Yellowstone burned in a historic and unrelenting wildfire, a man discovered his body was ablaze with the unforgiving disease of cancer, and that same man, contemplating what could be his last great adventure, purchased a 12th-century Romanesque 10”x10”x5” lock box for $25,000. Alone, and in secret, sitting in his newly purchased Santa Fe home, the man known as Forrest Fenn quietly began to fill the mystery box with gold coins, priceless antiques, and his favorite treasures. As he placed each item inside, he’d imagine the memories that each object quietly held, their stories and secrets of the past and the stories yet untold now woven into his very own story.

Decades later in 2009, on a desolate stretch of Yellowstone backcountry road, the 80 year old Fenn pulled into a dirt parking lot next to a creek nearby his sacred fishing hole. Years of carefully architecting a plan, Fenn already knew his likely and familiar destination. Surveying his surroundings, he took a deep breath of the crisp fresh air — his nose filled with the smell of pinyon trees, sagebrush, and fresh water. Ready, he ventured off 2.5 miles into the clearing to confirm his special spot.

Hours later, after verifying the place, he returned to his car and pulled off a blanket covering his bronze chest full of treasure. Fenn strenuously unloaded the box which now weighed over 40 lbs. Moving much slower this time he embarked back on the trail, down a canyon, and into the wood. Arriving at the boxes final resting place, Forrest sat next to a strong rock wall. He reflected on his life of adventure, as the high waters of the falls next to him babbled into the creek below. Carefully holding the box one last time his fingers gently inspected the two strong columns and beautiful Roman figures engraved in the bronze. He tucked the box into it’s hiding place, walked back to his car and murmured to himself, “Forrest Fenn, did you just do that?” He paused, looked back again and then resolved to never divulge the treasures explicit location to anyone.

Sitting in his car, he pulled out a well-worn notebook from his glovebox to review his “map”, a 24-line poem filled with clues leading to the treasure. An idea and plan seemingly inspired by Minerva, the goddess of poetry, art, and wisdom. . . .

As I have gone alone in there
And with my treasures bold,
I can keep my secret where,
And hint of riches new and old.
 
Begin it where warm waters halt
And take it in the canyon down,
Not far, but too far to walk.
Put in below the home of Brown.
 
From there it’s no place for the meek,
The end is ever drawing nigh;
There’ll be no paddle up your creek,
Just heavy loads and water high.
 
If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,
Look quickly down, your quest to cease,
But tarry scant with marvel gaze,
Just take the chest and go in peace.
 
So why is it that I must go
And leave my trove for all to seek?
The answers I already know,
I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak.
 
So hear me all and listen good,
Your effort will be worth the cold.
If you are brave and in the wood
I give you title to the gold.

Satisfied with his work, and not looking back, Fenn drove away.

Weeks later in his home office, Forrest reviewed the final manuscript of his memoir titled, The Thrill of the Chase. Flipping through towards the end of the manuscript, Fenn smiled as his eyes gazed upon the typed letters of his poem. In just a few months his book would be published and soon the entire world would know his secret. A secret he still hadn’t yet divulged to anyone, including his own family. Lost in his thoughts Fenn tried to imagine the reaction to his work, the people who would try to solve the puzzle, and the stories he’d be told of hope and adventure from fellow seekers like him.

In the years following the publication of his memoir, Fenn would look back at that moment alone in his office and realize that that night wasn’t just any night, it was the spark that started a wildfire.

Guest

I've heard of this and it is intriguing however the story seems fake.
He gets diagnosed with raging cancer yet he survives "decades later" then at 80 he hikes twice 2.5 miles deep in the woods and back with one trip carrying a 40 lb box for a total of 10 miles all at 80 years old after having cancer for decades
It seems fake to me.
(12-08-2018, 03:08 AM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]Have any of you played amateur sleuth to explore possible locations of Forrest Fenn's treasure? I had fun with this last winter, kind of forgot about it until I came across some maps I had saved. I'm not actually going to explore the real world, but I'm still into trying to break down the clues. Last year I had 4 or 5 solid possibilities. But I think all had been explored numerous times...

Anyone?

His treasure is hidden in his home, read CAREFULLY what he said, then you'll see. and that is WHY someone tried to break into his home/office a few months ago, and the cops got to him first, but the guy figured it out
(12-08-2018, 03:34 AM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]Guess not... :(

https://medium.com/@zholmquist/the-spark...bf0fae5095

Quote:In the year 1988 a seemingly unconnected series of events occurred: millions of acres of Yellowstone burned in a historic and unrelenting wildfire, a man discovered his body was ablaze with the unforgiving disease of cancer, and that same man, contemplating what could be his last great adventure, purchased a 12th-century Romanesque 10”x10”x5” lock box for $25,000. Alone, and in secret, sitting in his newly purchased Santa Fe home, the man known as Forrest Fenn quietly began to fill the mystery box with gold coins, priceless antiques, and his favorite treasures. As he placed each item inside, he’d imagine the memories that each object quietly held, their stories and secrets of the past and the stories yet untold now woven into his very own story.

Decades later in 2009, on a desolate stretch of Yellowstone backcountry road, the 80 year old Fenn pulled into a dirt parking lot next to a creek nearby his sacred fishing hole. Years of carefully architecting a plan, Fenn already knew his likely and familiar destination. Surveying his surroundings, he took a deep breath of the crisp fresh air — his nose filled with the smell of pinyon trees, sagebrush, and fresh water. Ready, he ventured off 2.5 miles into the clearing to confirm his special spot.

Hours later, after verifying the place, he returned to his car and pulled off a blanket covering his bronze chest full of treasure. Fenn strenuously unloaded the box which now weighed over 40 lbs. Moving much slower this time he embarked back on the trail, down a canyon, and into the wood. Arriving at the boxes final resting place, Forrest sat next to a strong rock wall. He reflected on his life of adventure, as the high waters of the falls next to him babbled into the creek below. Carefully holding the box one last time his fingers gently inspected the two strong columns and beautiful Roman figures engraved in the bronze. He tucked the box into it’s hiding place, walked back to his car and murmured to himself, “Forrest Fenn, did you just do that?” He paused, looked back again and then resolved to never divulge the treasures explicit location to anyone.

Sitting in his car, he pulled out a well-worn notebook from his glovebox to review his “map”, a 24-line poem filled with clues leading to the treasure. An idea and plan seemingly inspired by Minerva, the goddess of poetry, art, and wisdom. . . .

As I have gone alone in there
And with my treasures bold,
I can keep my secret where,
And hint of riches new and old.
 
Begin it where warm waters halt
And take it in the canyon down,
Not far, but too far to walk.
Put in below the home of Brown.
 
From there it’s no place for the meek,
The end is ever drawing nigh;
There’ll be no paddle up your creek,
Just heavy loads and water high.
 
If you’ve been wise and found the blaze,
Look quickly down, your quest to cease,
But tarry scant with marvel gaze,
Just take the chest and go in peace.
 
So why is it that I must go
And leave my trove for all to seek?
The answers I already know,
I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak.
 
So hear me all and listen good,
Your effort will be worth the cold.
If you are brave and in the wood
I give you title to the gold.

Satisfied with his work, and not looking back, Fenn drove away.

Weeks later in his home office, Forrest reviewed the final manuscript of his memoir titled, The Thrill of the Chase. Flipping through towards the end of the manuscript, Fenn smiled as his eyes gazed upon the typed letters of his poem. In just a few months his book would be published and soon the entire world would know his secret. A secret he still hadn’t yet divulged to anyone, including his own family. Lost in his thoughts Fenn tried to imagine the reaction to his work, the people who would try to solve the puzzle, and the stories he’d be told of hope and adventure from fellow seekers like him.

In the years following the publication of his memoir, Fenn would look back at that moment alone in his office and realize that that night wasn’t just any night, it was the spark that started a wildfire.

there is much more he has stated and that is where the key is, it is in his home/office. read it al you will see!! LOL,