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Full Version: A Picture Tells a Thousand Lies: Modern Propaganda Surrounding the War for Southern Independence
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Sometime in the mid-90s I bought a cassette tape titled, Songs of the Civil War which features modern recordings of songs that both Union and Confederate soldiers would have found familiar.  The album’s cover art shows several Union army musicians in the background but the central and most prominent image, which is superimposed over the musicians, is a photo of a black drummer, perhaps a teenager, wearing a Union uniform.  Now what exactly is this image trying to say, or rather, what are the people who put this artwork together trying to make us believe?  Is a black Union drummer the typical soldier of that era?  Black men eventually made up approximately ten percent of Lincoln’s military.  Were all the black people involved in the war fighting for Lincoln?  Why not show a Confederate image?  Why not show a black Confederate?  That would be interesting.  But that would also be unlikely since one of the album’s producers was Ken Burns, a notorious propagandist and distorter of American history, including black American history.

           Images certainly have or can have an effect on the imagination, whether photographs, drawings, paintings or visuals created with computers.  Our society literally bombards us with imagery.  We see it on the internet, on television, on city buses, cereal boxes, billboards, album covers, postage stamps and the list goes on and on and all of this must have some sort of effect on the psyche.  Publishing an illustrated book purporting to cover a conflict, for example, where the visuals depict one side of a conflict while including practically no visuals of the other side of the conflict must influence the unsuspecting reader.  Similarly, a book which features positive images for one side of the same conflict and practically nothing but negative or unflattering images of the other side of the conflict must also influence the reader’s thoughts.  A book which does both – the few illustrations, many of which show a negative view – would certainly betray a bias toward one side.  
https://confederateshop.com/my-two-cents...ependence/
...
You may be pleased to learn this .


[Image: umiiVr2.png]


https://www.conservativereview.com/news/...-monument/


.
(11-04-2018, 08:18 AM)Heir Wrote: [ -> ]You may be pleased to learn this .


[Image: umiiVr2.png]


https://www.conservativereview.com/news/...-monument/


.

Whoa, that's where daddy is buried. I wonder why my aunt or uncle didn't mention this. Yes, black men served in the civil war. On both sides.
(11-04-2018, 08:18 AM)Heir Wrote: [ -> ]You may be pleased to learn this .


[Image: umiiVr2.png]


https://www.conservativereview.com/news/...-monument/


.

I think it is great, as long as they tell the whole story:
The Camp Nelson Expulsion: The Union Army, Black Recruits, and their Families
http://history.ky.gov/landmark/the-camp-...-families/
(11-04-2018, 05:48 AM)SMOK3SC33N Wrote: [ -> ]


If this is directed at me, you can go to hell.
If not, my sincerest apologies.
(11-04-2018, 02:39 PM)Cid Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-04-2018, 05:48 AM)SMOK3SC33N Wrote: [ -> ]


If this is directed at me, you can go to hell.
If not, my sincerest apologies.

I'm not sure why I posted that in this thread. Scratchinghead
Was a little tipsy last night.
No.
Not directed at you.
Unless you're one of my exes. Chuckle
Pretty sure I just meant to post it in my thread.
(11-04-2018, 02:43 PM)SMOK3SC33N Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-04-2018, 02:39 PM)Cid Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-04-2018, 05:48 AM)SMOK3SC33N Wrote: [ -> ]


If this is directed at me, you can go to hell.
If not, my sincerest apologies.

I'm not sure why I posted that in this thread.    Scratchinghead  
Was a little tipsy last night.  
No.
Not directed at you.
Unless you're one of my exes.    Chuckle    
Pretty sure I just meant to post it in my thread.
That's OK, been there, done that! Chuckle
(11-04-2018, 05:41 AM)Cid Wrote: [ -> ]Sometime in the mid-90s I bought a cassette tape titled, Songs of the Civil War which features modern recordings of songs that both Union and Confederate soldiers would have found familiar.  The album’s cover art shows several Union army musicians in the background but the central and most prominent image, which is superimposed over the musicians, is a photo of a black drummer, perhaps a teenager, wearing a Union uniform.  Now what exactly is this image trying to say, or rather, what are the people who put this artwork together trying to make us believe?  Is a black Union drummer the typical soldier of that era?  Black men eventually made up approximately ten percent of Lincoln’s military.  Were all the black people involved in the war fighting for Lincoln?  Why not show a Confederate image?  Why not show a black Confederate?  That would be interesting.  But that would also be unlikely since one of the album’s producers was Ken Burns, a notorious propagandist and distorter of American history, including black American history.

           Images certainly have or can have an effect on the imagination, whether photographs, drawings, paintings or visuals created with computers.  Our society literally bombards us with imagery.  We see it on the internet, on television, on city buses, cereal boxes, billboards, album covers, postage stamps and the list goes on and on and all of this must have some sort of effect on the psyche.  Publishing an illustrated book purporting to cover a conflict, for example, where the visuals depict one side of a conflict while including practically no visuals of the other side of the conflict must influence the unsuspecting reader.  Similarly, a book which features positive images for one side of the same conflict and practically nothing but negative or unflattering images of the other side of the conflict must also influence the reader’s thoughts.  A book which does both – the few illustrations, many of which show a negative view – would certainly betray a bias toward one side.  
https://confederateshop.com/my-two-cents...ependence/

Where do I start with you?
History is written by the winner. That's the way it is. The North won by
overwhelming The South with numbers and industrial might. Anyone with
1/2 a brain knew that in 1859 but people in a Fourth Turning do the damnedest
things.
1. The war did not begin because of slavery as the first issue.
2. The 10th amendment of the Bill of Rights is not about slavery rights only.
3. The war never solved the bigger question: Can a State (or Territory) leave the
Union if they so desire?
4. Over 90% of Confederates did not or never did own a slave.
5. After 1866, the Federal leviathan has grown to the beast we know today.

That war ended 152 years ago. Be patient. We are selecting sides again.
Civil War Soundtrack ‑ Ashokan Farewell

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZmxZThb084

I watch this series once a year...
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