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Full Version: Eggs... Fuck em!
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(12-10-2018, 02:16 PM)Road Glide Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-10-2018, 02:04 PM)DaJavoo Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-10-2018, 01:55 PM)Road Glide Wrote: [ -> ]I wondered the same thing, just how old are the eggs we get at the grocery.   We had some fresh from dads chickens that stayed in the fridge for a couple of months and they still had peeling issues.

Thanks for the tip, but it seems I've tried all the methods people have kindly provided here, and the fresh eggs still are a pain in the ass.

I've considered investing in one of these  https://neggmaker.com/  but I think you can get the same results just using a old mason jar.   1dunno1

RG, that does exactly the same thing as my tip ^^^.

I tap the egg all around with the back of a spoon ~ it cracks the shell all around just like that gizmo.

The results are identical.

Save the money.  I KNOW you got a spoon somewhere.   Chuckle

Deviled egg time is coming up again soon,  I'll have some fun experimenting a bit instead of getting pissed.   Chuckle

Never tried a spoon, I just bash them on the inside walls of the sink.   Anon

Well, however you do it ~ do it GENTLY. The eggie will absorb a good deal of the 'shock', where as the shell will just crack, especially after having the shit boiled out of it.

Once the shell is shattered all around the egg, just snatch it off! Chuckle
How long can you store eggs?

A damn long time ~ months.

From a testing article: https://www.motherearthnews.com/real-foo...az77ndzgoe

[1] Unwashed, fertile homestead eggs seem to store much better than washed, unfertile agribiz eggs. Why? Probably for the simple reason that they're unwashed . . . and not because they're fertile. Hen fruit, as it comes from the chicken, is coated with a light layer of a natural sealing agent called "bloom". And, while a good wash may make a batch of eggs look more attractive, it also removes this natural protective coating . . . leaving the eggs more subject to aging and attack by the air and bacteria in the air.

[2] The very best way we've found to stash eggs away for long-term storage is in a sealed container at a temperature of 35 degrees Fahrenheit to 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Their whites may become somewhat runny looking over a period of time, but even after seven months—the cackleberries stored in this manner smell good, taste good, have a good texture, and — in short — seem "almost fresh".


Eggs will keep at a cool room temp if the are UNWASHED, straight from the hen. In Europe they do not wash the eggs. The hens lay down a protective anti-biotic layer on them. In the U.S., retail/commercial eggs are washed, so they ALWAYS need refrigeration.

You can keep fresh eggs for MONTHS (6+) if refrigerated, in a closed container. The whites may get a little runny and the yolks flat, but they will not be 'bad' eggs. Commercial eggs are good for a couple of months PAST 'best by' date stamped on the carton.

As I mentioned, I keep a small flock and they only thing I do is knock off any yuk from the fresh egg, or if it's really poopy, I'll wash it off and cook it for the pups. Washing the eggs can actually force any contamination further into the egg ~ the shell is porous.
(12-10-2018, 02:34 PM)DaJavoo Wrote: [ -> ]How long can you store eggs?

A damn long time ~ months.

From a testing article:  https://www.motherearthnews.com/real-foo...az77ndzgoe

[1] Unwashed, fertile homestead eggs seem to store much better than washed, unfertile agribiz eggs. Why? Probably for the simple reason that they're unwashed . . . and not because they're fertile. Hen fruit, as it comes from the chicken, is coated with a light layer of a natural sealing agent called "bloom". And, while a good wash may make a batch of eggs look more attractive, it also removes this natural protective coating . . . leaving the eggs more subject to aging and attack by the air and bacteria in the air.

[2] The very best way we've found to stash eggs away for long-term storage is in a sealed container at a temperature of 35 degrees Fahrenheit to 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Their whites may become somewhat runny looking over a period of time, but even after seven months—the cackleberries stored in this manner smell good, taste good, have a good texture, and — in short — seem "almost fresh".


Eggs will keep at a cool room temp if the are UNWASHED, straight from the hen.  In Europe they do not wash the eggs.  The hens lay down a protective anti-biotic layer on them.  In the U.S., retail/commercial eggs are washed, so they ALWAYS need refrigeration.

You can keep fresh eggs for MONTHS (6+) if refrigerated, in a closed container.  The whites may get a little runny and the yolks flat, but they will not be 'bad' eggs.  Commercial eggs are good for a couple of months PAST 'best by' date stamped on the carton.

As I mentioned, I keep a small flock and they only thing I do is knock off any yuk from the fresh egg, or if it's really poopy, I'll wash it off and cook it for the pups.  Washing the eggs can actually force any contamination further into the egg ~ the shell is porous.

Cackleberries - Jptdknpa

Never heard them called that before.

Good info Daj. Dad was telling me this same thing when I questioned why he had a bunch of eggs stored that were not in the fridge. Those were the freshest eggs and due to that coating, they would be just fine until he could sell or give away the ones stored in the fridge and make room for those. He has 50+ chickens so eggs coming out his ears and limited cold storage space.
(12-10-2018, 02:44 PM)Road Glide Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-10-2018, 02:34 PM)DaJavoo Wrote: [ -> ]How long can you store eggs?

A damn long time ~ months.

From a testing article:  https://www.motherearthnews.com/real-foo...az77ndzgoe

[1] Unwashed, fertile homestead eggs seem to store much better than washed, unfertile agribiz eggs. Why? Probably for the simple reason that they're unwashed . . . and not because they're fertile. Hen fruit, as it comes from the chicken, is coated with a light layer of a natural sealing agent called "bloom". And, while a good wash may make a batch of eggs look more attractive, it also removes this natural protective coating . . . leaving the eggs more subject to aging and attack by the air and bacteria in the air.

[2] The very best way we've found to stash eggs away for long-term storage is in a sealed container at a temperature of 35 degrees Fahrenheit to 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Their whites may become somewhat runny looking over a period of time, but even after seven months—the cackleberries stored in this manner smell good, taste good, have a good texture, and — in short — seem "almost fresh".


Eggs will keep at a cool room temp if the are UNWASHED, straight from the hen.  In Europe they do not wash the eggs.  The hens lay down a protective anti-biotic layer on them.  In the U.S., retail/commercial eggs are washed, so they ALWAYS need refrigeration.

You can keep fresh eggs for MONTHS (6+) if refrigerated, in a closed container.  The whites may get a little runny and the yolks flat, but they will not be 'bad' eggs.  Commercial eggs are good for a couple of months PAST 'best by' date stamped on the carton.

As I mentioned, I keep a small flock and they only thing I do is knock off any yuk from the fresh egg, or if it's really poopy, I'll wash it off and cook it for the pups.  Washing the eggs can actually force any contamination further into the egg ~ the shell is porous.

Cackleberries -  Jptdknpa

Never heard them called that before.

Good info Daj.  Dad was telling me this same thing when I questioned why he had a bunch of eggs stored that were not in the fridge.  Those were the freshest eggs and due to that coating, they would be just fine until he could sell or give away the ones stored in the fridge and make room for those.  He has 50+ chickens so eggs coming out his ears and limited cold storage space.

I find homes for my excess. Back when I had a 50+ flock I gave them to a senior group, and in that age group, they ALL raised chickens and lived on a farm. Low income seniors really appreciate fresh eggs. I bet if your dad asks around, somebody would be glad to take them off his hands and distribute in a charitable fashion.
I luv eggs.

But I buy the cage free brown eggs.

And sometimes those don't peel well.

But that's not a problem if you are cooking an omelet.

Chuckle
(12-10-2018, 02:16 PM)Road Glide Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-10-2018, 02:04 PM)DaJavoo Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-10-2018, 01:55 PM)Road Glide Wrote: [ -> ]I wondered the same thing, just how old are the eggs we get at the grocery.   We had some fresh from dads chickens that stayed in the fridge for a couple of months and they still had peeling issues.

Thanks for the tip, but it seems I've tried all the methods people have kindly provided here, and the fresh eggs still are a pain in the ass.

I've considered investing in one of these  https://neggmaker.com/  but I think you can get the same results just using a old mason jar.   1dunno1

RG, that does exactly the same thing as my tip ^^^.

I tap the egg all around with the back of a spoon ~ it cracks the shell all around just like that gizmo.

The results are identical.

Save the money.  I KNOW you got a spoon somewhere.   Chuckle

Deviled egg time is coming up again soon,  I'll have some fun experimenting a bit instead of getting pissed.   Chuckle

Never tried a spoon, I just bash them on the inside walls of the sink.   Anon

If you throw them really hard at the wall the shells come right off.
(12-10-2018, 05:50 AM)Legion Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-10-2018, 03:51 AM)PickleSnout Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-10-2018, 03:01 AM)Fossy Wrote: [ -> ]It bothers me too sometimes and I have my own chickens. Have you ever noticed that sometimes when you’re making hash browns the potatoes smell kind of fishy? Is it just me?

I buy russets and golden and reds trying to avoid that. Mr. Foss says my sense of smell is offf but I rarely eat fresh potatoes because of that.

Yes, I have gotten that fishy smell from other veggies too, most notably, corn.
Reminded me of the old indian way of growing corn with fish.

Cannabis growers swear all the nutrients a plant will ever need is a whole fish buried a foot or two beneath the seed/seedling.
Is that how the Indians grew corn with fish?

From what I read they buried the fish with 5 kernels, about a foot deep.
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