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Full Version: ive got a question for LINUX users
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woo good info here for linux noobs. what i appeal to peppermint is the simplistic interface. the other linux ones are too complicated. all i want is user friendly linux OS..as iam mostly computer illiterate. i need to get a new flash drive -64GB and run a live version again, set persistant file of 10GB to make room for addons . or an external drive of 1000GB set file to 250GB
Just download the Ultimate Boot CD, and run partition magic.

Chuckle

It has a browser and other crap. Just be sure not to FUBAR your hard drives.

Chuckle
Well, that was surprising. Both the Linux peppermint and Linux mint Cinnamon deleted all 3 partitions on my hard drive, then installed.
Thank god it's only my laptop.
Am I doing something wrong or is this normal procedure.
(09-04-2018, 03:34 PM)Rodent Wrote: [ -> ]Well, that was surprising. Both the Linux peppermint and Linux mint Cinnamon deleted all 3 partitions on my hard drive, then installed.
Thank god it's only my laptop.
Am I doing something wrong or is this normal procedure.

Most installer routines (especially Ubuntu/Mint) ASK you and give specific OPTIONS and plenty of chances to back out and change your mind.

It depends how the installer runs ~ sounds like it formatted everything into one partition and made itself the only OS.

There is usually an 'option' to install along side existing OS'es.

Alternately, you can specify root/temp/home partitions, et.al. ~ This is usually called 'Other' or 'Something Different'

Guest

you are not secure, you can use an old nokia phone. that is even more safe then your linux pc.

Dream on, btw nsa is down too, third day counting.
(09-04-2018, 03:41 PM)DaJavoo Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-04-2018, 03:34 PM)Rodent Wrote: [ -> ]Well, that was surprising. Both the Linux peppermint and Linux mint Cinnamon deleted all 3 partitions on my hard drive, then installed.
Thank god it's only my laptop.
Am I doing something wrong or is this normal procedure.

Most installer routines (especially Ubuntu/Mint) ASK you and give specific OPTIONS and plenty of chances to back out and change your mind.

It depends how the installer runs ~ sounds like it formatted everything into one partition and made itself the only OS.

There is usually an 'option' to install along side existing OS'es.

Alternately, you can specify root/temp/home partitions, et.al. ~ This is usually called 'Other' or 'Something Different'

This is exactly what it did. I had nothing on the hard drive. I just use it to test O.S. It's about 15 years old but it still words

LinuxGuest

Most Linux distro has something called "Package Manger" (i.e. Synaptic Package Manager).  You normally need to use it to install applications that your Linux distribution already have in their "application repository".

You can do a web search on the "type" of applications you want to use:

  linux open source web browsers

  linux open source graphics editors

  linux open source image viewers

  linux open source pdf viewers

  linux open source video players

  linux open source media players

  . . .

Compression utilities like tar (.tar, tar.z, .tar.gz, .tgz files) unzip (.zip files), gunzip (.gz files) should already be installed on most Linux distribution, if not you can install it from your distribution's standard repository.  There's also xarchiver (GUI, GTK+ frontend for most used compression formats).

Few of the useful apps are:  LibreOffice/OpenOffice, Kate/Geany (multi-tab text editor), Firefox/IceWeasel (web browser with noscript, adblock add-ons), VLC (media player), Gwenview (image viewer), Okular (PDF viewer), Gimp (image/graphic editor), mhWaveEdit (audio editor for recording, cut/paste).

You should also learn how to search/query your distribution's repository for certain keyword(s) to see if the application you want to install is in that repository, ready for you to install.

I generally prefer "open source" applications over "free" (but non open-source) ones.

Some of those apps may not be in your Linux distribution's "application repository", there are various reasons for that.  You may want to find out why.  Debian application repositories generally only have "open source" applications.  If it is really popular and reputable, it should already be in the application repository.

Might as well learn these.  Windows interface and configurations, as well as applications are constantly changing, too.  People just get so used to it they don't even realize that.
Thank you LinuxGuest. You been very helpful.
(09-04-2018, 04:16 PM)LinuxGuest Wrote: [ -> ]Most Linux distro has something called "Package Manger" (i.e. Synaptic Package Manager).  You normally need to use it to install applications that your Linux distribution already have in their "application repository".

You can do a web search on the "type" of applications you want to use:

  linux open source web browsers

  linux open source graphics editors

  linux open source image viewers

  linux open source pdf viewers

  linux open source video players

  linux open source media players

  . . .

Compression utilities like tar (.tar, tar.z, .tar.gz, .tgz files) unzip (.zip files), gunzip (.gz files) should already be installed on most Linux distribution, if not you can install it from your distribution's standard repository.  There's also xarchiver (GUI, GTK+ frontend for most used compression formats).

Few of the useful apps are:  LibreOffice/OpenOffice, Kate/Geany (multi-tab text editor), Firefox/IceWeasel (web browser with noscript, adblock add-ons), VLC (media player), Gwenview (image viewer), Okular (PDF viewer), Gimp (image/graphic editor), mhWaveEdit (audio editor for recording, cut/paste).

You should also learn how to search/query your distribution's repository for certain keyword(s) to see if the application you want to install is in that repository, ready for you to install.

I generally prefer "open source" applications over "free" (but non open-source) ones.

Some of those apps may not be in your Linux distribution's "application repository", there are various reasons for that.  You may want to find out why.  Debian application repositories generally only have "open source" applications.  If it is really popular and reputable, it should already be in the application repository.

Might as well learn these.  Windows interface and configurations, as well as applications are constantly changing, too.  People just get so used to it they don't even realize that.

All that is great info! Yeah And well worth "learning" to finesse out the fun details and goodies!

To keep things easy peasy for noobs, most new distros offer 'Software Stores' or 'Software Managers' which are GUI front-ends for Synaptic ~ which are usually great ways for peeps to get an idea of the wealth of software/programs available.
Many moons ago my good friend @DaJavoo showed me how to download and then burn an iso file to disk. I have never looked back since then. That was an Ubuntu distro, now I am currently running a Mint distro, Linux was a game changer for me and like I said, I have never ran any other windows OS since my days at ION, and my first Ubunto distro.

Whatever happened to compiz.config? That add on still available?
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