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Full Version: What You Need to Know About Your Fascia
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWU_DnC9t4I

Warning: This video contains footage of dissections of human bodies that may be disturbing for sensitive viewers.


Story at-a-glance

Your fascia, the fibrous connective tissue found throughout your body, accounts for about 20 percent of your body mass

Your fascia stores and moves water, and carries voltage, acting like an electrical wiring system

Fascia may play a significant role in pain, especially back pain. The reason for this is because the fascia is one interconnected system, and when it loses its suppleness, pain can transfer from one region to another

Fascia is made up of fibroblasts — cells that produce collagen and other fibers — held together by a surrounding matrix. Physical inactivity causes the fascia to tighten and become less supple

The fascia’s ability to slide plays a major role in back pain. Fascia in people without back pain can slide about 75 percent of its length; in people with back pain, this movement is reduced to about 50 percent

The 2018 DW Documentary, “The Mysterious World Beneath the Skin,” delves into the workings and functions of your fascia, the fibrous connective tissue found throughout your body. Remarkably, this thin layer of tissue accounts for about 20 percent of your body mass.

As explained by Dr. Jerry Tennant in his book, “Healing Is Voltage: The Handbook,” your muscles are stacked one on top of the other in a specific order (much like batteries in a flashlight) to form a power pack. Each organ has its own battery pack, which is a stack of muscle batteries.

These muscle batteries are in turn surrounded by fascia, which acts as a semiconductor — an arranged metabolic molecule designed to move electrons at the speed of light, but only in one direction.

Together, the muscle stack and the surrounding fascia serve as the wiring system for your body, carrying the voltage from the muscle battery inside, out, through the fascia and to the appropriate organ. In addition to moving electricity, fascia also acts as a hydraulic pump, and is responsible for moving fluid around your body.

As noted by Dr. Dana Cohen, a doctor of internal medicine and author of “Quench: Beat Fatigue, Drop Weight, and Heal Your Body Through the New Science of Optimum Hydration,” a book about optimizing hydration, your fascia is actually a movement system for water in your body. To activate this system — and optimize cellular hydration — you have to engage in physical movement.

more: https://articles.mercola.com/sites/artic...ascia.aspx
Interesting. I have been working on an aircraft design most of my life that incorporates something like this in its "exoskeleton"..
:bump and pin

Prf nli

Seriously thought the thread was going to be a home improvement tip with the fascia thing. Heh.
Yup, thought -fall is coming, I better check this...

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Thank you Talon.
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(09-01-2018, 11:50 AM)Prf nli Wrote: [ -> ]Seriously thought the thread was going to be a home improvement tip with the fascia thing.  Heh.

Totally Chuckle