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Full Version: Either This Data is Incorrect or These Physicists Just Changed the World
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When it comes to applied quantum mechanics, there are two “holy grails” in the field.

One is building a large scale quantum computer and the other is achieving superconductivity above the freezing point of water, colloquially known as room temperature superconductivity. Superconductors are materials that have no electrical resistance—meaning that electrons can flow through the object unimpeded—but so far physicists have only been able to achieve superconductivity by bringing the materials to incredibly cold temperatures. If superconductivity could be harnessed at room temperature, it would allow for the free transport of energy, wildly faster computers, and incredibly precise sensors. Indeed, it would fundamentally change the world.

In July, Dev Thapa and Anshu Pandey, two well-regarded chemical physicists from the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, India, posted a paper to arXiv that claims they managed to achieve “superconductivity at ambient temperature and pressure conditions” using a matrix of gold and silver particles. This announcement understandably shocked the physics community. Not only did Thapa and Pandey claim to have achieved room temperature superconductivity, but they did it using gold and silver, which have never demonstrated superconductivity even at extremely cold temperatures.

Yet as the physics community began to look closer at the data, something didn’t seem right. On Friday, Brian Skinner, a postdoctoral physicist at MIT, posted a comment on Thapa and Pandey’s arXiv paper that noted a strange correlation between two independent measurements.

more: https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/artic...-the-world
A quantum breakthrough, indeed.
Is anybody else getting a 404?
(08-16-2018, 05:40 PM)hurchel Wrote: [ -> ]Is anybody else getting a 404?

not here
(08-16-2018, 05:41 PM)Mmmkay Ultra Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-16-2018, 05:40 PM)hurchel Wrote: [ -> ]Is anybody else getting a 404?

not here

I tried that link 5 times get a little horse that says it is not there..

But it is getting ready to storm, maybe it is the satellite..
(08-16-2018, 05:48 PM)hurchel Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-16-2018, 05:41 PM)Mmmkay Ultra Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-16-2018, 05:40 PM)hurchel Wrote: [ -> ]Is anybody else getting a 404?

not here

I tried that link 5 times get a little horse that says it is not there..

But it is getting ready to storm, maybe it is the satellite..

I think this is related..
https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.08572

Guest

BS.

Sorry.
This is just BS.
(08-16-2018, 05:32 PM)Talon Wrote: [ -> ]When it comes to applied quantum mechanics, there are two “holy grails” in the field.

One is building a large scale quantum computer and the other is achieving superconductivity above the freezing point of water, colloquially known as room temperature superconductivity. Superconductors are materials that have no electrical resistance—meaning that electrons can flow through the object unimpeded—but so far physicists have only been able to achieve superconductivity by bringing the materials to incredibly cold temperatures. If superconductivity could be harnessed at room temperature, it would allow for the free transport of energy, wildly faster computers, and incredibly precise sensors. Indeed, it would fundamentally change the world.

In July, Dev Thapa and Anshu Pandey, two well-regarded chemical physicists from the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, India, posted a paper to arXiv that claims they managed to achieve “superconductivity at ambient temperature and pressure conditions” using a matrix of gold and silver particles. This announcement understandably shocked the physics community. Not only did Thapa and Pandey claim to have achieved room temperature superconductivity, but they did it using gold and silver, which have never demonstrated superconductivity even at extremely cold temperatures.

Yet as the physics community began to look closer at the data, something didn’t seem right. On Friday, Brian Skinner, a postdoctoral physicist at MIT, posted a comment on Thapa and Pandey’s arXiv paper that noted a strange correlation between two independent measurements.

more:  https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/artic...-the-world

Wow, very cool! I have seen superconductors' amazing properties but only after they were submerged in liquid nitrogen. Nice report.
(08-16-2018, 05:53 PM)Mmmkay Ultra Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-16-2018, 05:48 PM)hurchel Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-16-2018, 05:41 PM)Mmmkay Ultra Wrote: [ -> ]not here

I tried that link 5 times get a little horse that says it is not there..

But it is getting ready to storm, maybe it is the satellite..

I think this is related..



https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.08572

Thank you, I had to look up diamagnetic... Anon So there is a different or more hand able synergy with the silver gold combination? Err wut?
(08-16-2018, 06:04 PM)hurchel Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-16-2018, 05:53 PM)Mmmkay Ultra Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-16-2018, 05:48 PM)hurchel Wrote: [ -> ]I tried that link 5 times get a little horse that says it is not there..

But it is getting ready to storm, maybe it is the satellite..

I think this is related..



https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.08572

Thank you, I had to look up diamagnetic... Anon  So there is a different or more hand able synergy with the silver gold combination? Err wut?

1dunno1

This was reminding me of Cassandra and her cold fusion in a thermos on her kitchen table/MIB saga from 2003
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