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Full Version: I need some advice about an aggressive dog
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Reach out to your new neighbors and explain the situation to them. They may be willing to work with you or even help in some way.

Road Glide

(07-23-2018, 05:04 PM)Catch Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 04:54 PM)Road Glide Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 03:59 PM)Catch Wrote: [ -> ]I don't give a fuck what the dog thinks, or you either for that matter. I gave the suggestion to @Jypsie based on my experience with the worse basket case of a dog I've ever met in my life that happened to work.

If you have any input besides bashing other's methods, I am sure the OP would appreciate your input. If not, then there's no reason for you to be posting in this thread.

From what I have read and watched about dogs, that guest is pretty spot on.  That being said, not all dogs are the same or respond to the same methods.  There will always be exceptions out there that require something different.

I understand how someone could be at the end of their rope with a troubled dog and willing to try anything that might possibly work, including treats as rewards for desired acceptable behavior.

Could that guest have provided their information in a less condescending way, sure.  Were they wrong with their information, not in my opinion.

Love ya Catch, not trying to stir shit, just looking at it from a different angle is all.

You could never stir shit with me, I have way too much respect for you for that to ever happen  Drinks

My point is that Jypsie has her back against the wall and is running out of time. Any dog is going to be easily motivated with food treats and any "shortcut" is going to be beneficial in the short term. I understand the whole "Alpha is the only way to go" thing, but that usually takes some time to establish if the dog has already been in the family for awhile.

Plus, I disagree with the Guests comment that the treat/event approach would confuse the dog. I think they're more intelligent than that and it's essentially a step in creating some sort of communication with them. Once they understand "doorbell is good", then you can take a firmer approach and wean them off the treats.

I'm no Ceasar Millan and I've got a few scars that prove I don't always know what I'm talking about, but the whole treat/event thing seemed to bring about the least amount of blood  Chuckle

Heartflowers


All great points.

LL&R
(07-23-2018, 02:13 PM)Jypsie Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 02:05 PM)Luvapottamus Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 02:00 PM)Jypsie Wrote: [ -> ]She is 100% obedient until there is a trigger, which is any outside noise or movement or person.  So I’m am wondering if meds will chill her out enough so that when a trigger happens, I can’t get her attention to redirect her.

I only know of dogs on Xanax for things like fireworks or car trips.  The medication won’t stop negative behavior, but it might relax her enough to be able to focus and learn a new behavior.  She is very eager to please- she just can’t handle outside stimuli.

Bad idea IMO.

You have to intervene when it happens.

Dogs have short attention spans unless something exciting is going on.

Which means you'll have time to correct her when it happens, but you have to do it when it happens.

If it only happens a few times a day that's fine.

Catch her in the act once a day. Or as many times as you can.

Be as watchful as you can for the next week and correct her every time if you can.


When I come home from the eye doctor, I’ll play ring the door bell and try this technique.
I can keep trying for a few days and see if I get any positive response.  Then I can work on rewarding the quiet behavior and encouraging her to wait quietly at the door or in a place she feels safe.

When you correct her say no, and if she stops pet her and praise her.

If she doesn't stop on "no", flip her over on her back and hold her until she licks her nose.

Then let her up and pet her, but don't praise her.

If she starts again, start with "no".....and praise her when she stops at "no."

Otherwise flip her over.

She'll get the point.

You should get to the point where "no" gets her attention no matter what it is you want her to stop doing.

Chuckle

Road Glide

(07-23-2018, 05:10 PM)Munchaab Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 05:05 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 03:59 PM)Catch Wrote: [ -> ]I don't give a fuck what the dog thinks, or you either for that matter. I gave the suggestion to @Jypsie based on my experience with the worse basket case of a dog I've ever met in my life that happened to work.

If you have any input besides bashing other's methods, I am sure the OP would appreciate your input. If not, then there's no reason for you to be posting in this thread.

Slow your roll hotshot.. no one is "bashing" a fuckin thing.

I've been working with dogs for over 40 years, all types.

I gave her the best "advice" that is available.  and that is for her to learn dogs.

And if you" don't give a fuck what the dog thinks"..  thats not very helpful is it?  For the dog or her.

An insecure dog is an aggressive dog, she needs to learn "dog".

And just so you know.. I'll post where ever I feel like posting.

Knock of the name calling - or you get a guest troll status...

Everything else is OK...

Hey Guest, make an account. Don't want Munch to give you the boot.
(07-23-2018, 05:05 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 03:59 PM)Catch Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 03:56 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]All you are showing her is that YOU can ring the doorbell and give her food..

That is not "training" her.  That is confusing her.

I don't give a fuck what the dog thinks, or you either for that matter. I gave the suggestion to @Jypsie based on my experience with the worse basket case of a dog I've ever met in my life that happened to work.

If you have any input besides bashing other's methods, I am sure the OP would appreciate your input. If not, then there's no reason for you to be posting in this thread.

Slow your roll hotshot.. no one is "bashing" a fuckin thing.

I've been working with dogs for over 40 years, all types.

I gave her the best "advice" that is available.  and that is for her to learn dogs.

And if you" don't give a fuck what the dog thinks"..  thats not very helpful is it?  For the dog or her.

An insecure dog is an aggressive dog, she needs to learn "dog".

And just so you know.. I'll post where ever I feel like posting.

Did you read the OP's post? That some great advice you're giving for a new dog owner looking to adopt for the first time with a big selection to pick from.

I haven't seen one bit of advice from you to Jypsie that I'd consider to be beneficial. You claim you're not bashing, but you're sure as hell being condescending.

Let me ask you "hotshot", in your 40 years, have you been faced with a situation of having to save a doomed dog and there's not much time left? What have you done? What worked and what didn't? Or did you simply walk to the next kennel and ooh and awe over the next choice? That's the kind of advice the OP is looking for.

I look forward to what you have to add...

Guest

(07-23-2018, 03:54 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]All I am going to add is this.

You do not "train" a dog.

If a dog is acting out, it is because that dog does not feel he or she has a place in the overall order.

The dog is NOT well adjusted.

A well adjusted dog takes no orders because he / she knows already what is expected of them.

A well adjusted dog will do ANYTHING to please.. it is your job to give them the tasks

If this dog is acting out, it is because she does not feel she is a part of the unit.

You have to work on getting the dog adjusted properly and in a secure place, a secure dog does not act out.. period.

The largest problem is that people try and treat them like kids, they are not.. they are dogs and have their own language.  You have not learned it yet.

Aussies are by far the best dogs on the planet. they are smart, loyal and will learn their place and be wholly content very fast.

The dog has not failed you, you have failed the dog.  understand that and correct the issue, even if you have to pay a trainer.. do not give that pup drugs, this is the same recipe that makes school shooters.. give em a pill.

take responsibility and be the human your dog needs you to be.

I agree, that dog is stressed. Too many dogs in the home. Find homes for the others since they are more adoptable and keep the difficult one to work with. NO drugs, no dog put down.
(07-23-2018, 05:04 PM)Catch Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 04:54 PM)Road Glide Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 03:59 PM)Catch Wrote: [ -> ]I don't give a fuck what the dog thinks, or you either for that matter. I gave the suggestion to @Jypsie based on my experience with the worse basket case of a dog I've ever met in my life that happened to work.

If you have any input besides bashing other's methods, I am sure the OP would appreciate your input. If not, then there's no reason for you to be posting in this thread.

From what I have read and watched about dogs, that guest is pretty spot on.  That being said, not all dogs are the same or respond to the same methods.  There will always be exceptions out there that require something different.

I understand how someone could be at the end of their rope with a troubled dog and willing to try anything that might possibly work, including treats as rewards for desired acceptable behavior.

Could that guest have provided their information in a less condescending way, sure.  Were they wrong with their information, not in my opinion.

Love ya Catch, not trying to stir shit, just looking at it from a different angle is all.

You could never stir shit with me, I have way too much respect for you for that to ever happen  Drinks

My point is that Jypsie has her back against the wall and is running out of time. Any dog is going to be easily motivated with food treats and any "shortcut" is going to be beneficial in the short term. I understand the whole "Alpha is the only way to go" thing, but that usually takes some time to establish if the dog has already been in the family for awhile.

Plus, I disagree with the Guests comment that the treat/event approach would confuse the dog. I think they're more intelligent than that and it's essentially a step in creating some sort of communication with them. Once they understand "doorbell is good", then you can take a firmer approach and wean them off the treats.

I'm no Ceasar Millan and I've got a few scars that prove I don't always know what I'm talking about, but the whole treat/event thing seemed to bring about the least amount of blood  Chuckle

Heartflowers

He has a few scars as well,it does happen but you can't give up or back down. Never show her fear or anything other than"I'm the alpha around here".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ihXq_WwiWM
(07-23-2018, 05:25 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 03:54 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]All I am going to add is this.

You do not "train" a dog.

If a dog is acting out, it is because that dog does not feel he or she has a place in the overall order.

The dog is NOT well adjusted.

A well adjusted dog takes no orders because he / she knows already what is expected of them.

A well adjusted dog will do ANYTHING to please.. it is your job to give them the tasks

If this dog is acting out, it is because she does not feel she is a part of the unit.

You have to work on getting the dog adjusted properly and in a secure place, a secure dog does not act out.. period.

The largest problem is that people try and treat them like kids, they are not.. they are dogs and have their own language.  You have not learned it yet.

Aussies are by far the best dogs on the planet. they are smart, loyal and will learn their place and be wholly content very fast.

The dog has not failed you, you have failed the dog.  understand that and correct the issue, even if you have to pay a trainer.. do not give that pup drugs, this is the same recipe that makes school shooters.. give em a pill.

take responsibility and be the human your dog needs you to be.

I agree, that dog is stressed. Too many dogs in the home. Find homes for the others since they are more adoptable and keep the difficult one to work with. NO drugs, no dog put down.

We are addressing that.

I know who gets on her nerves, and while they are sweet loving dogs- if it helps her then it seems like the best way to go in order to save the aggressive ones life.

And in a situation where intense observation and training is needed- I need as much of my time feed up and less distractions with her.
(07-23-2018, 05:35 PM)MysticPizza Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 05:04 PM)Catch Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 04:54 PM)Road Glide Wrote: [ -> ]From what I have read and watched about dogs, that guest is pretty spot on.  That being said, not all dogs are the same or respond to the same methods.  There will always be exceptions out there that require something different.

I understand how someone could be at the end of their rope with a troubled dog and willing to try anything that might possibly work, including treats as rewards for desired acceptable behavior.

Could that guest have provided their information in a less condescending way, sure.  Were they wrong with their information, not in my opinion.

Love ya Catch, not trying to stir shit, just looking at it from a different angle is all.

You could never stir shit with me, I have way too much respect for you for that to ever happen  Drinks

My point is that Jypsie has her back against the wall and is running out of time. Any dog is going to be easily motivated with food treats and any "shortcut" is going to be beneficial in the short term. I understand the whole "Alpha is the only way to go" thing, but that usually takes some time to establish if the dog has already been in the family for awhile.

Plus, I disagree with the Guests comment that the treat/event approach would confuse the dog. I think they're more intelligent than that and it's essentially a step in creating some sort of communication with them. Once they understand "doorbell is good", then you can take a firmer approach and wean them off the treats.

I'm no Ceasar Millan and I've got a few scars that prove I don't always know what I'm talking about, but the whole treat/event thing seemed to bring about the least amount of blood  Chuckle

Heartflowers

He has a few scars as well,it does happen but you can't give up or back down. Never show her fear or anything other than"I'm the alpha around here".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ihXq_WwiWM

I highly recommend checking out some of his books.

Before I got my fist dog(we had other dogs but I chose my own at this age) when I was 13, or 14, I read all the dog training books in the library.

I'm sure he lays it out in a more complete and structured format than you'll get from tv, though seeing live examples is good too.

https://www.cesarsway.com/

Probably lots of free stuff here^^^

But I'd check some out at the library.
I also just went and picked up one of those eggs. They only had the hand held one available- so I’m adding that to the treats and door bell routine.
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