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Full Version: I need some advice about an aggressive dog
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(07-23-2018, 01:45 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]So how many dogs do you have? From your post there are at least 3. Why so many? You also say you have 6 children at home. That is way to chaotic of an environment for those animals. Why not rehome the others and keep the aggressive one?

It’s chaotic to someone who isn’t in my home 24/7.
My house is actually pretty calm. Not everyone is bouncing off the walls. The active times are when we all leave or come home. My herding dogs have excellent off switches. They know when to play a
We have five dogs- one of them is a senior- the others are all adults.

They are pretty chill. They play outside, and sleep when inside.
You have to condition her to stop.

The Dog Whisperer technique works.





That's not Cesar Milan^^^ but it's what worked with my rottweiler mix that came with the house.

Anytime he was aggressive, I'd say "no", then I rolled him over on his back and held him down.

Wait for it to lick it's nose, that's the sign of submission.

And use verbal "no" commands first, and if it doesn't stop, roll it on its back.

You'll have to spend some time on it.
(07-23-2018, 01:53 PM)Oregonian Wrote: [ -> ]Craigslist and meet the families that are interested?

I can’t do that. I won’t send her anywhere my vet can’t vouch for.
(07-23-2018, 01:54 PM)Luvapottamus Wrote: [ -> ]You have to condition her to stop.

The Dog Whisperer technique works.





That's not Cesar Milan^^^ but it's what worked with my rottweiler mix that came with the house.

Anytime he was aggressive, I'd say "no", then I rolled him over on his back and held him down.

Wait for it to lick it's nose, that's the sign of submission.

And use verbal "no" commands first, and if it doesn't stop, roll it on its back.

You'll have to spend some time on it.


She is 100% obedient until there is a trigger, which is any outside noise or movement or person. So I’m am wondering if meds will chill her out enough so that when a trigger happens, I can’t get her attention to redirect her.

I only know of dogs on Xanax for things like fireworks or car trips. The medication won’t stop negative behavior, but it might relax her enough to be able to focus and learn a new behavior. She is very eager to please- she just can’t handle outside stimuli.
(07-23-2018, 01:47 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]Dogs shouldn't be raised by women and this is why.

A woman probably raised you.

So thanks sunshine.
(07-23-2018, 01:49 PM)Road Glide Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 01:47 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]Dogs shouldn't be raised by women and this is why.

Ouch!!

Chuckle

You too.

Thanks.
(07-23-2018, 01:55 PM)Jypsie Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 01:53 PM)Oregonian Wrote: [ -> ]Craigslist and meet the families that are interested?

I can’t do that.  I won’t send her anywhere my vet can’t vouch for.

SPCA might be able to place it for you if you can't train it.

But check out one of Ceasar Milan's books at the library and try the techniique I posted earlier.

Probably a lot of good info in his books, but that one trick worked for me.

I got the peching order set up backwards.

Cat was alfa male
Smallest dog
two dogs in the middle
Largest dog last.

Chuckle

The big dog got the picture after he killed one of our cats and I spent a week training him.

I had forgotton the previous owner had encouraged it to chase cats.

But he was not hard to untrain once the tragedy happened.

Only bad thing he did after that, was he pulled a tendon in his leg when F-16s scared him.

After that what he liked to do when I wasn't home was lay down by a food bowl and growl.

Chuckle

Now the little dog does the same thing to the biggest dog at doorways, when I'm not around.

"None shall pass!"

Chuckle
(07-23-2018, 02:00 PM)Jypsie Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 01:54 PM)Luvapottamus Wrote: [ -> ]You have to condition her to stop.

The Dog Whisperer technique works.





That's not Cesar Milan^^^ but it's what worked with my rottweiler mix that came with the house.

Anytime he was aggressive, I'd say "no", then I rolled him over on his back and held him down.

Wait for it to lick it's nose, that's the sign of submission.

And use verbal "no" commands first, and if it doesn't stop, roll it on its back.

You'll have to spend some time on it.


She is 100% obedient until there is a trigger, which is any outside noise or movement or person.  So I’m am wondering if meds will chill her out enough so that when a trigger happens, I can’t get her attention to redirect her.

I only know of dogs on Xanax for things like fireworks or car trips.  The medication won’t stop negative behavior, but it might relax her enough to be able to focus and learn a new behavior.  She is very eager to please- she just can’t handle outside stimuli.

Bad idea IMO.

You have to intervene when it happens.

Dogs have short attention spans unless something exciting is going on.

Which means you'll have time to correct her when it happens, but you have to do it when it happens.

If it only happens a few times a day that's fine.

Catch her in the act once a day. Or as many times as you can.

Be as watchful as you can for the next week and correct her every time if you can.
(07-23-2018, 02:05 PM)Luvapottamus Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 02:00 PM)Jypsie Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-23-2018, 01:54 PM)Luvapottamus Wrote: [ -> ]You have to condition her to stop.

The Dog Whisperer technique works.





That's not Cesar Milan^^^ but it's what worked with my rottweiler mix that came with the house.

Anytime he was aggressive, I'd say "no", then I rolled him over on his back and held him down.

Wait for it to lick it's nose, that's the sign of submission.

And use verbal "no" commands first, and if it doesn't stop, roll it on its back.

You'll have to spend some time on it.


She is 100% obedient until there is a trigger, which is any outside noise or movement or person.  So I’m am wondering if meds will chill her out enough so that when a trigger happens, I can’t get her attention to redirect her.

I only know of dogs on Xanax for things like fireworks or car trips.  The medication won’t stop negative behavior, but it might relax her enough to be able to focus and learn a new behavior.  She is very eager to please- she just can’t handle outside stimuli.

Bad idea IMO.

You have to intervene when it happens.

Dogs have short attention spans unless something exciting is going on.

Which means you'll have time to correct her when it happens, but you have to do it when it happens.

If it only happens a few times a day that's fine.

Catch her in the act once a day. Or as many times as you can.

Be as watchful as you can for the next week and correct her every time if you can.


When I come home from the eye doctor, I’ll play ring the door bell and try this technique.
I can keep trying for a few days and see if I get any positive response. Then I can work on rewarding the quiet behavior and encouraging her to wait quietly at the door or in a place she feels safe.
Wow Jypsie, I am sorry for your situation. What a horrible, horrible thing to have to go through. I can imagine all the thoughts that were running through your mind when it happened.

I've mentioned him on here before, but I think it was before you joined up. I took in a rescue German Shepherd several years ago that was by far the meanest dog I had ever met. The day I picked him up, he wanted nothing more than to kill me...that, I have no doubts. He had been on a chain in someone's back yard for his first two years. The yard was privacy fenced and the couple who had him didn't have other family. I doubt he had rarely seen other people or really, any other animals for that matter up until he and I met.

Once I got him home, he was a little better of course, but he just barely tolerated me at that point. He was good around my daughter, otherwise I wouldn't have even given him a chance of course.

You can even see his snarl in this photo as I was trying to get him to pose. This was just a couple months after first bringing him home:

[Image: ggtyOoN.jpg]

He absolutely hated everyone else and he too went ballistic if the doorbell rang. There was no way I could trust him around my daughter's friends, but we started working with him. In my case, the secret was "Zebra Cakes" lol. I had some in the cupboard one day and one of my daughter's friends came over. I squatted next to him and grabbed his collar with both hands (his leather leash was tied to a couch leg also just in case). The friend came in slowly and right away, the hair on his back stood up and I felt the low grumble in his throat. My daughter handed her friend a Zebra Cake and she very, very slowly offered it to my dog. He actually took it gently and that's how things started.

Often, we would work on training by offering him a treat, then ring the doorbell. I didn't want to do it the opposite way since of course he'd go nuts and I didn't want to reward that behavior. He finally got to the point where he'd run to the door when the bell rang, but with his tongue hanging out and all smiley looking. We then started taking him on walks, but I kept a few dog treats in my pocket. He didn't want to get too far from those of course, so he stayed close to my side. Dogs are very much food motivated and I thought I needed all the help I could get lol.

It took some time, but we finally got him "normal" and where I could trust him around people finally. Here he is at Christmas a few years ago...you can see he's just a big dork by now lol...

[Image: eLqrMzQ.jpg]

I know you can do this, but I'm not sure how much time you have. I am afraid to say, it's going to take some work to get your dog ready. I would suggest you try the "treat/event" method now and hopefully your dog's a quick learner. One thing I do think that would help is, once you move, cover the dog's kennel with a dark blanket when she's inside (depending on the room temp of course). My beast was too big for a kennel to be practical, but I often found him curled up under my desk, so I'd fold a blanket over the top to cover the opening. He seemed to like hiding in his "cave" when there was too much going on.

I wish we were closer, I'd be happy to take her in short term to help you out. I think you need to try what you can to keep her. I felt your heart in your post and I know what you'd go through if you tried to give her up.

Good luck and God Bless my friend... Heartflowers
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