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Full Version: The nightmare fuel hidden in Richard Feynman’s FBI file
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Two hundred pages into the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s copious file on the famed physicist Richard Feynman, and the reader is treated to a quite the surprise: a bizarre collage of what appears to be Feynman’s face alongside large swaths of redacted text … with a few cryptic phrases like “doubt everything” and “is a God” left intact.

It is unclear if the redactions are original or are the work of the FBI, though the Bureau is certainly responsible for the low quality of the scans, which adds to their eeriness.

Also included - and potentially clues to the origins of the collage - is a brochure for the iconic Los Angeles department store Bullock’s Wilshire …

https://www.muckrock.com/news/archives/2...mare-fuel/
Weird...

Is a God? Cryptic.

Guest

I agree with
Richard Feynman was a legendary educator as well as a research physicist. He was always one of my favorite physics heroes. I last saw him as a member of the Commission investigating the Challenger accident in 1986. I had a minor role in that investigation.
Perhaps this is a clue as to what happened to his FBI file.....

"Due to the top secret nature of the work, the Los Alamos Laboratory was isolated. Feynman amused himself by investigating the combination locks on cabinets and desks used to secure papers. He found that people tended to leave their safes unlocked, or leave them on the factory settings, or write the combinations down, or use easily guessable combinations like dates.[64] Feynman played jokes on colleagues. In one case he found the combination to a locked filing cabinet by trying the numbers he thought a physicist would use (it proved to be 27–18–28 after the base of natural logarithms, e = 2.71828...), and found that the three filing cabinets where a colleague kept a set of atomic bomb research notes all had the same combination. He left a series of notes in the cabinets as a prank, which initially spooked his colleague, Frederic de Hoffmann, into thinking a spy or saboteur had gained access to atomic bomb secrets."


That was from his wiki page...
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Feynman

Sounds like Richard pulled the same prank on the FBI......
(06-07-2018, 09:16 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]I agree with

I did so..
(06-08-2018, 05:45 AM)OldWhiteGuy Wrote: [ -> ]Perhaps this is a clue as to what happened to his FBI file.....

"Due to the top secret nature of the work, the Los Alamos Laboratory was isolated. Feynman amused himself by investigating the combination locks on cabinets and desks used to secure papers. He found that people tended to leave their safes unlocked, or leave them on the factory settings, or write the combinations down, or use easily guessable combinations like dates.[64] Feynman played jokes on colleagues. In one case he found the combination to a locked filing cabinet by trying the numbers he thought a physicist would use (it proved to be 27–18–28 after the base of natural logarithms, e = 2.71828...), and found that the three filing cabinets where a colleague kept a set of atomic bomb research notes all had the same combination. He left a series of notes in the cabinets as a prank, which initially spooked his colleague, Frederic de Hoffmann, into thinking a spy or saboteur had gained access to atomic bomb secrets."


That was from  his wiki page...
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Feynman

Sounds like Richard pulled the same prank on the FBI......

Chuckle

Guest

(06-08-2018, 01:20 AM)PRIME Wrote: [ -> ]Richard Feynman was a legendary educator as well as a research physicist. He was always one of my favorite physics heroes. I last saw him as a member of the Commission investigating the Challenger accident in 1986. I had a minor role in that investigation.

The Challenger Astronauts that we were told all died,but most still seem to be alive.
(06-08-2018, 10:23 PM)Guest Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-08-2018, 01:20 AM)PRIME Wrote: [ -> ]Richard Feynman was a legendary educator as well as a research physicist. He was always one of my favorite physics heroes. I last saw him as a member of the Commission investigating the Challenger accident in 1986. I had a minor role in that investigation.

The Challenger  Astronauts  that  we were told all died,but most still seem to be alive.

Heh, so really it's "Need Another Seven Actors"?   Lmao  Facepalm