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Road Glide

I was raised eating black eyed peas, not just on New Years either.  We had black eyed peas quite often when I was a kid, especially during the growing season, fresh right out of the garden.

I still love to have black eyed peas 4 or 5 times a year when I can find fresh ones.  I'm lucky my ole lady loves them too because they seem to be something you either like or hate.

Cornbread is a must for me with black eyed peas, I just can't imagine eating them with out it.

Anyhow, I have always wondered where the tradition of eating black eyed peas on New Years came from.  It dates all the way back to the Civil War.




History of the Black Eyed Pea Tradition
May We Never Forget Our Roots & Traditions!!!
By Ron Perrin, Fort Worth Texas

"The Real Story is much more interesting and has gone untold in fear that feelings would be hurt. It’s a story of war, the most brutal and bloody war, military might and power pushed upon civilians, women, children and elderly. Never seen as a war crime, this was the policy of the greatest nation on earth trying to maintain that status at all costs. An unhealed wound remains in the hearts of some people of the southern states even today; on the other hand, the policy of slavery has been an open wound that has also been slow to heal but is okay to talk about.

The story of THE BLACK EYED PEA being considered good luck relates directly back to Sherman's Bloody March to the Sea in late 1864. It was called The Savannah Campaign and was lead by Major General William T. Sherman. The Civil War campaign began on 11/15/64 when Sherman 's troops marched from the captured city of Atlanta, Georgia, and ended at the port of Savannah on 12/22/1864.

When the smoke cleared, the southerners who had survived the onslaught came out of hiding. They found that the blue belly aggressors that had looted and stolen everything of value and everything you could eat including all livestock, death and destruction were everywhere. While in hiding, few had enough to eat, and starvation was now upon the survivors.

There was no international aid, no Red Cross meal trucks. The Northern army had taken everything they could carry and eaten everything they could eat. But they couldn’t take it all. The devastated people of the south found for some unknown reason that Sherman ’s bloodthirsty troops had left silos full of black eyed peas.

At the time in the north, the lowly black eyed pea was only used to feed stock. The northern troops saw it as the thing of least value. Taking grain for their horses and livestock and other crops to feed themselves, they just couldn’t take everything. So they left the black eyed peas in great quantities assuming it would be of no use to the survivors, since all the livestock it could feed had either been taken or eaten.

Southerners awoke to face a new year in this devastation and were facing massive starvation if not for the good luck of having the black eyed peas to eat. From New Years Day 1866 forward, the tradition grew to eat black eyed peas on New Year’s Day for good luck."

Today, the tradition of eating black-eyed peas for the New Year has evolved into a number of variations and embellishments of the luck and prosperity theme including:

Served with greens (collards, mustard or turnip greens, which varies regionally), the peas represent coins and the greens represent paper money. In some areas cabbage is used in place of the greens.

Cornbread, often served with black-eyed peas and greens, represents gold.

For the best chance of luck every day in the year ahead, one must eat at least 365 black-eyed peas on New Year's Day.
   
Black-eyed peas eaten with stewed tomatoes represent wealth and health.
   
In some areas, actual values are assigned with the black-eyed peas representing pennies or up to a dollar each and the greens representing anywhere from one to a thousand dollars.

Adding a shiny penny or dime to the pot just before serving is another tradition practiced by some. When served, the person whose bowl contains the penny or dime receives the best luck for the New Year, unless of course, the recipient swallows the coin, which would be a rather unlucky way to start off the year.

The catch to all of these superstitious traditions is that the black-eyed peas are the essential element and eating only the greens without the peas, for example, will not do the trick.
Yummy
Pro tip:

Pressure cook for better digestion.
I grew up with my (German) grandmother making pork roast and sauerkraut, peas and mashed potatoes on New Years Day for 'good luck'. I assume since they all went through WWII they were done with the black eyed peas and substituted fresh or frozen regular peas.

Road Glide

(05-20-2018, 06:23 PM)Troller Durden Wrote: [ -> ]Pro tip:

Pressure cook for better digestion.

Grandma used to pressure cook them before she canned them.

When we do black eyed peas, I cook them for 4-5 hours with bacon, onion, garlic salt and pepper.
Cant eat em.

When I was a kid i thought my mother made a pot of fingertips with black finger nails.

fo reelz

Yeah3
(05-20-2018, 06:34 PM)Highlander Wrote: [ -> ]Cant eat em.

When I was a kid i thought my mother made a pot of fingertips with black finger nails.

fo reelz

Yeah3

I still cant eat wontons.

Don't ask....
(05-20-2018, 06:03 PM)FallingDown Wrote: [ -> ]Yummy

Yes they are!

Road Glide

(05-20-2018, 06:42 PM)Troller Durden Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-20-2018, 06:34 PM)Highlander Wrote: [ -> ]Cant eat em.

When I was a kid i thought my mother made a pot of fingertips with black finger nails.

fo reelz

Yeah3

I still cant eat wontons.

Don't ask....

Well shit, now I gotta ask. Chuckle
(05-20-2018, 06:44 PM)Road Glide Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-20-2018, 06:42 PM)Troller Durden Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-20-2018, 06:34 PM)Highlander Wrote: [ -> ]Cant eat em.

When I was a kid i thought my mother made a pot of fingertips with black finger nails.

fo reelz

Yeah3

I still cant eat wontons.

Don't ask....

Well shit, now I gotta ask.   Chuckle

Sorry, it will trigger my ptsd.

Chuckle
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