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I'll get to my architecture ideas in the second or third post, but a little background first.

My first PC was an Apple IIc. I wrote my first screenplay on the Appleworks word processor, and it was a pain in the butt because I had to use key-commands to format every line.

But it never crashed. Thing booted off floppy discs, and you had to change floppies pretty often depending on what software you needed because there wasn't enough RAM to load all of the floppies at the same time.

Chuckle

It wasn't internet connected, but it was debugged before they sold it and everything worked. It was VERY SECURE.

I could trust nobody would be able to steal my crappy action-adventure movie without PHYSICAL ACCESS.

Fast forward to 1991 when the ICQ virus ate my Austin Computer Company 486/33.

Didn't take it long to burn up my computer, and not having much cash, I built a new one from a bare bones kit.

I stuck a used hard drive in that one, was preparing to load an OS, but when I booted it up the first time I discovered the hard disk already had windows 98 on it and it worked....

So I just used it. I'll admit that's a Winblow$ license infringement but statute of limitations has expired.

Chuckle

Jump to 2003;

I built another PC and I bought windows XP pro and officeworks from a cousing who worked at M$. He got them at the company store for me cheap.

Built another one for my wife, and we bough XP home for her at a computer store.

Service Pack II came out and it was slow to load, so I nixxed the update, and all my friends who did let it install: it bricked their computers.

First version of service pack II came with the blue screen of death.

Chuckle

This should never happen.

I noticed my hard disk was always running, and processes were going crazy most the time, the machine was very slow, so I switched to LINUX, eventually tried out BDS's and many LINUX distros, and later MacOS.

None of them are secure.

SELINUX developed by the NSA is pretty tight, but administering it is a pain in the butt.

It's overly complex, and there's no guarantee it's not bugged because like the others you get the software from the INTERNET.

At one point I decided to switch careers from auto mechanic to computer administrator. So I got my A+ certification(squeeked in the last month for the lifetime cert) and I was training for CCNA when my network was hacked.

Never finished that cert. The plan was to try to land a gig as admin at a medium sized business, do all the administration, help desk, and network for a medium sized company for a fat paycheck and an air conditioned gig with vacations and decent benefits and retirement package.

I had friends who were doing it, and it took them all several years climbing the ladder from small computer repair shops to administrative jobs at large corporations.

I needed to skip a few "paying your dues, making your bones" years so I had immersed myself in this technology as a hobby before deciding to make the switch, and I was working on certs.

At the same time I rebuilt a whole bunch of PC's and MACs so I could stock a computer repair shop with cheap inventory in case I decided to go that route as an entrapraneur instead of an employee.

But I was also posting my unpopular opinions on conspiracy fora, and getting hacked for it, eventually including my air-gapped computers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BadBIOS
Meet “badBIOS,” the mysterious Mac and PC malware that jumps airgaps
Like a super strain of bacteria, the rootkit plaguing Dragos Ruiu is omnipotent.

https://arstechnica.com/information-tech...s-airgaps/

https://www.reddit.com/r/badBIOS/

It's not Bad BIOS, not exactly. It's https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempest_(codename)
And

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_ANT_catalog

And similar tech.

I'm not accusing the NSA of doing it but if it isn't, it's some of their buddies.

And it's why I'm at the library today.

Chuckle

Next the issues; the debate that's needed, and then my recommendations for the right balance of security, privacy, and functionality.
(05-10-2018, 10:45 AM)Luvapottamus Wrote: [ -> ]I'll get to my architecture ideas in the second or third post, but a little background first.

My first PC was an Apple IIc. I wrote my first screenplay on the Appleworks word processor, and it was a pain in the butt because I had to use key-commands to format every line.

But it never crashed. Thing booted off floppy discs, and you had to change floppies pretty often depending on what software you needed because there wasn't enough RAM to load all of the floppies at the same time.

Chuckle

It wasn't internet connected, but it was debugged before they sold it and everything worked. It was VERY SECURE.

I could trust nobody would be able to steal my crappy action-adventure movie without PHYSICAL ACCESS.

Fast forward to 1991 when the ICQ virus ate my Austin Computer Company 486/33.

Didn't take it long to burn up my computer, and not having much cash, I built a new one from a bare bones kit.

I stuck a used hard drive in that one, was preparing to load an OS, but when I booted it up the first time I discovered the hard disk already had windows 98 on it and it worked....

So I just used it. I'll admit that's a Winblow$ license infringement but statute of limitations has expired.

Chuckle

Jump to 2003;

I built another PC and I bought windows XP pro and officeworks from a cousing who worked at M$. He got them at the company store for me cheap.

Built another one for my wife, and we bough XP home for her at a computer store.

Service Pack II came out and it was slow to load, so I nixxed the update, and all my friends who did let it install: it bricked their computers.

First version of service pack II came with the blue screen of death.

Chuckle

This should never happen.

I noticed my hard disk was always running, and processes were going crazy most the time, the machine was very slow, so I switched to LINUX, eventually tried out BDS's and many LINUX distros, and later MacOS.

None of them are secure.

SELINUX developed by the NSA is pretty tight, but administering it is a pain in the butt.

It's overly complex, and there's no guarantee it's not bugged because like the others you get the software from the INTERNET.

At one point I decided to switch careers from auto mechanic to computer administrator. So I got my A+ certification(squeeked in the last month for the lifetime cert) and I was training for CCNA when my network was hacked.

Never finished that cert. The plan was to try to land a gig as admin at a medium sized business, do all the administration, help desk, and network for a medium sized company for a fat paycheck and an air conditioned gig with vacations and decent benefits and retirement package.

I had friends who were doing it, and it took them all several years climbing the ladder from small computer repair shops to administrative jobs at large corporations.

I needed to skip a few "paying your dues, making your bones" years so I had immersed myself in this technology as a hobby before deciding to make the switch, and I was working on certs.

At the same time I rebuilt a whole bunch of PC's and MACs so I could stock a computer repair shop with cheap inventory in case I decided to go that route as an entrapraneur instead of an employee.

But I was also posting my unpopular opinions on conspiracy fora, and getting hacked for it, eventually including my air-gapped computers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BadBIOS
Meet “badBIOS,” the mysterious Mac and PC malware that jumps airgaps
Like a super strain of bacteria, the rootkit plaguing Dragos Ruiu is omnipotent.

https://arstechnica.com/information-tech...s-airgaps/

https://www.reddit.com/r/badBIOS/

It's not Bad BIOS, not exactly. It's https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempest_(codename)
And

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_ANT_catalog

And similar tech.

I'm not accusing the NSA of doing it but if it isn't, it's some of their buddies.

And it's why I'm at the library today.

Chuckle

Next the issues; the debate that's needed, and then my recommendations for the right balance of security, privacy, and functionality.

I just turn my computer on and it works. If it breaks I buy a new one. That's as far as my competence goes as far as this subject. Chuckle
The issues:

Security
Privacy
Reliability
National Security

Everybody who buys a computer should expect security, privacy and reliability offline and be entitled to protection of their privacy and intellectual property.

Online there's a bit of a trade-off, between security/privacy and functionality.

And with regards to national security it gets harder. I like that our intelligence agencies can hack into anything and everything in other countries. We need to know what's going on in the world.

But they aren't supposed to do it here, and they way they do it elsewhere makes it easier to do here.

So there needs to be a PUBLIC DEBATE over these priorities.

I have some architecture recommendations and sharing those won't spoil the debate.
If I had the resources of Apple INC, or Google, or HP or Dell, here's what I'd build:

A Dual board PC that boots to ROM:

Each board has its own CPU, RAM, storage and monitor.
They share a mouse and power supply
They each have a hologram ROM that contains the operating system and all permanent software.

When you boot up, you don't have to load the operating system, only a shell basically and a desktop.

Because since the OS and software are on a hologram, it's always available when the light(for the hologram) is on.

You have two computers in one case, and only one is on at a time.
The OFFLINE computer doesn't have any networking hardware.
The offline computer controls passage of files to and from the hard disk on the online computer.

When you mouse over to the monitor on the Offline board, the light on the online board goes off, and it goes into suspend mode and vice-versa. (This could be configured differently depending on your needs) You could also have multiple other boards for server and software testbed applications.

Because the OS and software are PERMANANT you need never worry that the internet changes it.

But they have to be debugged before sold like the old apple IIc.

If for any reason the OS or software makers find bugs they have to SNAIL MAIL you a new ROM.

And we need a deal so that you can pick your OS features and software A la carte, and have them combined @ the OS and software outlets.

For example: I want Final Draft on my PC. Let's say it's a DEll. Dell burns me a ROM with Windows and Final Draft on it.

On my offline board, I don't have network hardware, so I don't need network software in my os or remote assistance or any related bloat.

I don't need antivirus because I can't get a virus because my OS and software are on a burn once ROM sticker.

Chuckle

Get the idea?

I've spent many hours reconfiguring LINUXes to contain all the packages I want. Every time I load a LINUX it takes me days to replace the packages I don't want with the ones I do. When that's done I should be able to burn it to a ROM, slide it under my CPU and be DONE FOREVER.

Done until mechanical failure.
(05-10-2018, 10:50 AM)Dark Moon Wrote: [ -> ]I just turn my computer on and it works. If it breaks I buy a new one. That's as far as my competence goes as far as this subject.  Chuckle

Oh but it doesn't work.

If it was secure, Scott Pruitt wouldn't need a SCIF.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensitive_...n_Facility

And neither would I.

And none of us would need updates on our software. My Apple IIc never did.

DMNLI

(05-10-2018, 11:20 AM)Luvapottamus Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-10-2018, 10:50 AM)Dark Moon Wrote: [ -> ]I just turn my computer on and it works. If it breaks I buy a new one. That's as far as my competence goes as far as this subject.  Chuckle

Oh but it doesn't work.

If it was secure, Scott Pruitt wouldn't need a SCIF.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensitive_...n_Facility

And neither would I.

And none of us would need updates on our software. My Apple IIc never did.

I'm posting here and listening to music. Works fine for me. Updates? I don't need no frigging updates. I turn that function off as soon as I buy my PC. I have a windows 8 and never had a problem. Chuckle If it breaks I buy a new one. 1dunno1
Functionality:

The Galactic Desktop

When I boot my computer I don't want to see a skin with a bunch of unrelated crap polluting my view.

Folders and folder trees obscure things; apple came up with "stacks" which is an improvement, I want a cosmos.

Galaxies, planetary systems, moons, and I want to choose the icon from material within the files.

EXAMPLE

When I was rebuilding Dells, I'd open them up, test the power supply, blow out the dust, install the fastest CPU I had for the motherboard, and maximum matching RAM.

Then I'd go to the Dell support site and download the manuals, drivers, wallpapers, etc.

All that crap I'd put in folders inside the "Dell Poweredge 4650 Server" folder(or whatever it was).

I'd rather have a "Star" with the picture of the computer from the first page of the hardware manual as the icon for that star.

With a Planet that's called "drivers" and moons around that planet "video, audio, etc"

When I zoom out those moons go away in the distance, zoom out further I see that star in the Dell galaxy with the other ones I'm doing.

Wouldn't that be cool?

Yeah3

You should be able to zoom in all the way to the ROM under the CPU and the processes going on in the OS scheduler.
A little bit more on the hologram idea:

It's a burn-once "sticker" or "slide" lit by a light, and imaged by an ultra high definition CCD sensor like in a digital camera.

Resolution is 1:1, meaning if you have 4GB of OS+Software you have a 4GP CCD sensor.

Probably will "pan and scan" but should be easily as fast as "seeking" on a hard disk. Plus it could be engineered so that important stuff you need all the time is located on the top lines of the hologram.

At present what the computers do is boot BIOS, then load the operating system off the hard drive into RAM; at least critical functions and the desktop.

Doing it this way you don't really need to load it to RAM or not as much because as long as the light is on it's all there ALL AT ONCE.

You need some scheduling stuff in there so it can SUSPEND when the light is turned off, but should be REALLY FAST, faster than what we do now.
(05-10-2018, 11:26 AM)DMNLI Wrote: [ -> ]I'm posting here and listening to music. Works fine for me. Updates? I don't need no frigging updates. I turn that function off as soon as I buy my PC. I have a windows 8 and never had a problem.  Chuckle  If it breaks I buy a new one.  1dunno1

How did you prevent it from becoming Windows 10?

Chuckle

DMNLI

(05-10-2018, 11:41 AM)Luvapottamus Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-10-2018, 11:26 AM)DMNLI Wrote: [ -> ]I'm posting here and listening to music. Works fine for me. Updates? I don't need no frigging updates. I turn that function off as soon as I buy my PC. I have a windows 8 and never had a problem.  Chuckle  If it breaks I buy a new one.  1dunno1

How did you prevent it from becoming Windows 10?

Chuckle

I don't know. It might just have and I don't know it. Chuckle All I know is that it works.
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