The Fringe | Conspiracy, News, Politics, and Fun Forum!

Full Version: Amazon bosses try to raise morale by giving exhausted staff two 7p chocolates each after shocking working conditions
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Neil Drinkwater, who recently quit the company, says the gesture was 'insulting' - while others in the delivery giant say they've heard NOTHING about how conditions will be improved

Amazon bosses try to raise morale by giving exhausted staff two 7p chocolates each after shocking working conditions were exposed

Neil Drinkwater, who recently quit the company, says the gesture was 'insulting' - while others in the delivery giant say they've heard NOTHING about how conditions will be improved

Miserly Amazon bosses reacted to the Sunday Mirror’s investigation into its shocking working conditions – by giving out tiny chocolates.

Staff on gruelling 10-and-a-half-hour shifts were given one Celebration sweet in the first half of their day and another in the second half.

The bizarre gesture is revealed today by former employee Neil Drinkwater – who quit after his partner read our exposé and realised for the first time what he had been enduring.

We told last week of exhausted warehouse staff falling asleep on their feet as they chased impossible targets.

And the five-week investigation led to a widespread backlash against the £7.3billion-a-year online giant.

Neil, 41, started at Amazon after losing his sales job when the construction firm he worked for went bust.

He told us: “This week our managers started coming round with a box of ­Celebrations for the first part of the shift, and gave us a chocolate each.

“Then they did the same at the second part of the shift. Me and my colleagues were saying this was down to the Sunday Mirror. We all thought it was an insult.”

Staff at Amazon’s “fulfillment” centres, where orders are put together, packed and shipped, work up to 55 hours a week for £8.20 an hour.

Their boss, American Jeff Bezos, 53, is the world’s richest man. Like Neil, he is a dad of four. Last year he made £2.2million an hour.

Neil, who had spent a month on nights at Amazon’s plant near Manchester, handed in his resignation after ­Wednesday’s night shift.

Amazon bosses try to raise morale by giving exhausted staff two 7p chocolates each after shocking working conditions were exposed

Neil Drinkwater, who recently quit the company, says the gesture was 'insulting' - while others in the delivery giant say they've heard NOTHING about how conditions will be improved

Miserly Amazon bosses reacted to the Sunday Mirror’s investigation into its shocking working conditions – by giving out tiny chocolates.

Staff on gruelling 10-and-a-half-hour shifts were given one Celebration sweet in the first half of their day and another in the second half.

The bizarre gesture is revealed today by former employee Neil Drinkwater – who quit after his partner read our exposé and realised for the first time what he had been enduring.

We told last week of exhausted warehouse staff falling asleep on their feet as they chased impossible targets.

And the five-week investigation led to a widespread backlash against the £7.3billion-a-year online giant.

Neil, 41, started at Amazon after losing his sales job when the construction firm he worked for went bust.

He told us: “This week our managers started coming round with a box of ­Celebrations for the first part of the shift, and gave us a chocolate each.

“Then they did the same at the second part of the shift. Me and my colleagues were saying this was down to the Sunday Mirror. We all thought it was an insult.”

Staff at Amazon’s “fulfillment” centres, where orders are put together, packed and shipped, work up to 55 hours a week for £8.20 an hour.

Their boss, American Jeff Bezos, 53, is the world’s richest man. Like Neil, he is a dad of four. Last year he made £2.2million an hour.

Neil, who had spent a month on nights at Amazon’s plant near Manchester, handed in his resignation after ­Wednesday’s night shift.

He told how he asked a supervisor whether Amazon had any plans to improve conditions for workers.

Neil said: “I asked, ‘Did you read that article in the Mirror?’ He said yes, and that they’d had feedback off Amazon to say if anyone asks about it they should say they’re reviewing the target system and their procedures.

“I said, ‘What do you think?’ and he said, ‘I think it’s dire. The way they work you guys is terrible’.”

But Neil said the manager told him that Amazon bosses are secretly hoping the scandal will simply blow over.

He said: “They told me the chocolates were given out to try to raise spirits, to get everybody on board. It’s a couple of sweets per shift to get morale up and make them think they care about us. I found it quite insulting, to be honest.”

After five weeks undercover our ­investigator told last week how “pickers” at Amazon’s newest warehouse, in Tilbury, Essex, were given targets of processing at least 300 ordered items per hour.

And we photographed “packers” asleep at their stations where, if they achieve 120 boxes an hour, they earn seven pence per box. Ironically, seven pence is also the cost of a Celebration.

Staff at Tilbury reported that after our story small chocolate bars and free lunches were now being given as prizes for top-performing staff.

And another Manchester-based worker told us: “They’ve been handing out chocolates, but I’ve heard nothing about how they will make it better.”


Football coach Neil told how he had missed his first game in three years – through exhaustion. He said: “I needed money for Christmas and thought it was half decent pay, enough to tide me over.

“After four days I was dead on my feet. I honestly believe they exploit people’s necessity, their need for money. They feed off that.” Neil even found himself crying on the 20-minute bike ride to the warehouse near his Altrincham home. _ read on

[Image: Jwj0j7D.jpg]

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/ama...f-11629106
So shameful. And is piece work not illegal in the UK?

"And we photographed “packers” asleep at their stations where, if they achieve 120 boxes an hour, they earn seven pence per box. Ironically, seven pence is also the cost of a Celebration."

Break up Amazon! Best Christmas present ever! Cheer
I forget who it was predicted sweatshops would return to Western countries when Asians began to earn enough to make it less profitable to outsource. Perhaps it's a regional thing, I mean if Amazon promises your package delivered tomorrow that can't be done from China. And no one put a gun to their employee's head forcing them to work there. But Bezos is wrong thinking ripping off staff and forcing long hours is a good business practice. A happy workforce is far more productive than an angry one.
Their boss, American Jeff Bezos, 53, is the world’s richest man. Like Neil, he is a dad of four. Last year he made £2.2million an hour.


Super rich and pals around with the devil. Prime example of Evil on Earth

[Image: 33vivV4.jpg]