The Fringe | Conspiracy, News, Politics, and Fun Forum!

Full Version: Who Killed Steven Vincent
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2

~mc~

(11-03-2017, 01:18 PM)Twaddle Wrote: [ -> ]Hello fellow Fringers.

This is a thread I've wanted to do here for some time, but I find every time I try, I'm stymied.

Looking for articles, and finding pictures,..... etc,, is, supremely difficult.

Let me explain ;

Steven Vincent, was the first journalist to be kidnapped and executed in Iraq (Daniel Pearl was the first in Afghanistan)

He had gone to Iraq numerous times previously, and even wrote  a book about his experiences there called:  IN THE RED ZONE.

He had spent that last trip in Basra, as opposed to Baghdad, where all the journalists usually went.
He uncovered a conspiracy in Basra, involving the local police and their affiliations with shi'ite war lords in the area.

He had an article about all of it published on a Sunday, in the new york times.

His wife had begged him to come home first, and THEN publish the article.
He refused.
It came out Sunday. He was grabbed Monday off the street. His body was found early Tuesday morning.

It's been hypothesized that locals killed him for his article, but no one mentions how the Americans and British ignored what he was saying, and either or both, may, have been involved.

I can tell you the FBI and locals had Intel on the murderers, but ignored it all.
His death was in 2005. It's unsolved to this day. The FBI did absolute dick trying to solve it.

So I'm asking you Fringers, if you would like to investigate this story on your own, and you tell me who you think killed Steven Vincent.

The local police under orders from their handlers.
The brits.
The Americans.
A combination.
And you may ask yourself why..... this wasn't bigger news at the time.....
Indeed...

The reason I have a hard time looking into it myself, is that, he was my best friends husband .
I was maid of honor at their wedding.
I was at his funeral in nyc, on my birthday.

His death was completely in vain, and such a waste...

We miss him.

When I look for info about this, I just,.......... have a very hard time with it.
I always seem to find his death photos as well....

You never get over something like this. You really do not.
My best friend has never quite been the same... Which is also a tragedy in my eyes.

So if anyone would like to look, and give me their feed back,, I would also be happy to answer any questions that night not be out there.

I'm sorry you lost your friend @Twaddle ...

ill try to do some digging today :)
Vincent, then 49, was the only American journalist murdered during the occupation. Ten years after his death on August 2, 2005, his life and journalistic legacy are worth remembering as the Middle East is engulfed in the chaos that he saw coming.

Vincent's most interesting work was for his personal blog “In the Red Zone” and in articles for two conservative publications: National Review Online and FrontPage magazine. He had a devoted following, and on return trips to the U.S. gave a few radio and television interviews, and also participated in a seminar at San Jose State University in California. Known for his sharp analysis and moral clarity, Vincent had even “caught the attention of the White House,” recalled a former adviser to President George W. Bush and member of his National Security Council.

Bush's reading list included Vincent's 2004 book “In the Red Zone: A Journey into the Soul of Iraq,” said the former official, who asked not to be named, during a phone interview from Washington. Like many readers of “Red Zone,” Bush read it months after Vincent's death; headlines about Vincent's murder had spurred renewed interest in his book, which had enjoyed respectable sales after being published by a small conservative publisher in Texas. Bush subsequently sent Vincent's widow Lisa Ramaci a hand-written letter praising "In the Red Zone" and offering his condolences.

Vincent was working at home alone the day his life changed: September 11, 2001.

By 8:46 a.m., he was settling into his routine as a senior writer for Art + Auction, a glossy monthly magazine. Suddenly, the roar of a low-flying jet filled his East Village apartment. The sound faded. Vincent forgot about it until the phone rang minutes later, and a frantic neighbor told him to join her on the rooftop: a plane had crashed into the World Trade Center, less than three miles away.

“Steven knew immediately it was terrorism,” recalled Ramaci, speaking by phone from the same East Village apartment where she now lives alone. In her bedroom, the 58-year-old antiques appraiser has a small shrine, illuminated by a memorial candle, honoring her late husband.



http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/...s_ago.html
Moral Clarity

Above all, Vincent criticized the mainstream media for failing to recognize signs of progress in Iraq and for utilizing morally confusing language -- including terms like "insurgency," "guerrillas" or even "resistance fighters."

Vincent preferred "paramilitaries." He argued that it "evokes images of anonymous right-wing killers terrorizing a populace in the name of a repressive regime -- which is exactly what the fedayeen and jihadists are doing by terrorizing Iraqis with kidnappings, beheadings, and suicide bombings."

Writing in the National Review Online, Vincent expanded on this argument when he framed the fight in Iraq as being similar to America's civil rights struggle. "When gunmen stalk the Iraqi countryside, murdering civilians in the name of 'defending the homeland,' can we not see a modern-day Ku Klux Klan? They, too, were masked; they, too, mounted an 'insurgency'; they, too, sought to reinstate a reactionary regime based on ethnic and religious supremacy.”

And while many "culturally sensitive" reporters were reluctant to criticize Arab culture, Vincent zeroed in on what was fueling the insurgency in the Sunni Triangle, whose nihilistic nature had puzzled many journalists: it was a reflection, Vincent wrote in his book, of the all-consuming quest within Arab culture for "honor" and "self-respect." The fighters "see themselves as tribal warriors engaged in the venerable tradition of honor killings against the biggest tribe of all: America." He faulted the U.S.-led coalition for failing to quickly subdue the Sunni Triangle, which he said allowed tribal groups and the Baath Party to join forces.

Vincent's death, on his third reporting trip, came as the mainstream media was coming under increasing criticism for its war coverage, with much of the criticism revolving around its use of Iraqi reporters and photographers, not to mention its failure to report positive developments. Vincent had been researching his next book on the rise of Shiite fundamentalism. The revelations in his Times op-ed about Britain's see-no-evil occupation forces not only strained relations with Washington but eventually developed into a full-blown political scandal in Britain. Ironically, Vincent had decided to visit Basra on his third trip because there were no Western journalists based there (and he would thus have Basra to himself), and because he felt it would be relatively safe under British occupation.

Yet chaos was mounting all over Iraq, prompting Vincent to grow increasingly uneasy about how the occupation was being managed. “America rid us of one tyrant, only to give us hundreds more in the form of terrorists,” he quoted one man as saying in Umm Qasr, a port city near Kuwait, in an article in National Review. In his book, he elaborated: "Were we wrong in Iraq? Yes, in one major sense, beyond even the shortage of troops, failure to anticipate the Baathist-led insurrection and Abu Ghraib: we did not, and still don't understand the regressive, parasitical, unreasonable presence of tribal Islam -- the black hole in Iraqi and Arab cultures that consumes their best and most positive energies. Because of our blindness, we find ourselves fighting an enemy we do not see, comprehend, or even accurately identify."

He nonetheless argued that much still depended on America's willingness to "stay the course."
Iraqis always considered US troops as occupiers. They never wanted us there. Those who were the insurgents, were usually not from Iraq. But, from Iran. The split between the Sunnis and Shities goes back to the bible times. There was no way of bringing them together. Only a dictator, like Saddam was able to keep things in check, as bad as he was. There was nothing like today. The biggest mistake we made, was pulling troops out and causing a vacuum in the political and social system.
@Twaddle ... My sincere condolences to you and especially his wife.
That is a really tough one to have to live with. Heartflowers Hugs
I'm so sorry for your loss
my guess..All roads lead to

[Image: hillary.gif]

Steve Mumford, an American artist who shared an apartment with Vincent in Baghdad in 2003, said Vincent had told him in an e-mail some weeks ago he had a lot of information he knew could get him killed if it was published.

"He probably could have waited until he left. All I can think is he felt he had to get it out as soon as possible," Mumford said, adding that this was Vincent's third visit to Iraq and he had been due to leave soon.

He said Vincent had narrowly escaped death last year after being turned on by a crowd in the sacred Shi'ite city of Najaf following a car bombing.


http://www.discovery.org/a/2765
(11-04-2017, 09:37 AM)Twaddle Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-04-2017, 08:09 AM)JF Priest Wrote: [ -> ]my guess..All roads lead to

[Image: hillary.gif]

Steve Mumford, an American artist who shared an apartment with Vincent in Baghdad in 2003, said Vincent had told him in an e-mail some weeks ago he had a lot of information he knew could get him killed if it was published.

"He probably could have waited until he left. All I can think is he felt he had to get it out as soon as possible," Mumford said, adding that this was Vincent's third visit to Iraq and he had been due to leave soon.

He said Vincent had narrowly escaped death last year after being turned on by a crowd in the sacred Shi'ite city of Najaf following a car bombing.


http://www.discovery.org/a/2765

Hmmmmm.... I never thought of her, ever in this , but........ She was behind a lot of the bullshit over there.

She was the one who got his body home.
The military told Lisa  since he was not in the military, his body was not a priority.
She contacted numerous people for help.
He would have sat on ice in a Baghdad morgue for months.
Hillary was the one who stepped up. Now I wonder if it was out of guilt..
wow
If someone can connect these dots, I'd be forever grateful

It is impossible for hillary to feel guilt.. IMHO it was to help deflect any thought of her involvement..

Guest

Any fucker could have killed him, show your white skin in Iraq and it's high risk you'll end up dead.
Pages: 1 2