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'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia

Google, Twitter and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves from the internet. Paul Lewis reports on the Silicon Valley refuseniks alarmed by a race for human attention

Justin Rosenstein had tweaked his laptop’s operating system to block Reddit, banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin, and imposed limits on his use of Facebook. But even that wasn’t enough. In August, the 34-year-old tech executive took a more radical step to restrict his use of social media and other addictive technologies.

Rosenstein purchased a new iPhone and instructed his assistant to set up a parental-control feature to prevent him from downloading any apps.

He was particularly aware of the allure of Facebook “likes”, which he describes as “bright dings of pseudo-pleasure” that can be as hollow as they are seductive. And Rosenstein should know: he was the Facebook engineer who created the “like” button in the first place.

A decade after he stayed up all night coding a prototype of what was then called an “awesome” button, Rosenstein belongs to a small but growing band of Silicon Valley heretics who complain about the rise of the so-called “attention economy”: an internet shaped around the demands of an advertising economy.

These refuseniks are rarely founders or chief executives, who have little incentive to deviate from the mantra that their companies are making the world a better place. Instead, they tend to have worked a rung or two down the corporate ladder: designers, engineers and product managers who, like Rosenstein, several years ago put in place the building blocks of a digital world from which they are now trying to disentangle themselves. “It is very common,” Rosenstein says, “for humans to develop things with the best of intentions and for them to have unintended, negative consequences.”

Rosenstein, who also helped create Gchat during a stint at Google, and now leads a San Francisco-based company that improves office productivity, appears most concerned about the psychological effects on people who, research shows, touch, swipe or tap their phone 2,617 times a day.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2...y-dystopia

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~mc~

mine is definitely hijacked.
(10-06-2017, 10:05 PM)~mc~ Wrote: [ -> ]mine is definitely hijacked.



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It can hijack your mind and your body.

One part is the addiction; with most addictions, the toxin within the substance is the addictive component.

Nicotine, alcohol, morphine; all toxins.

But these devices are also psychologically toxic, and thereby addictive.

For example; I went to buy a car battery at Walmart a year ago, and there was a guy sitting in a chair by the counter whining over his dunce fone to his wife.

Chuckle

He couldn't wait to get home to argue and whine with her because he's addicted to it.
The other part is the bioelectric physiological effects.

Like flashing lights at a las vegas casino, these devices put you into a trance like state or a hyperactive agitated state or numerous others.

And it not only interferes with your psychological state but also your biological state.

Long term exposure leads to general sensory uptick, and an activation of the immune system, both of which go hyperactive trying to combat an infection that isn't present, they they burn out and become hypoactive, leading to all sorts of disease conditions.
Well apparently they have a mind reading machine which they will probably put to good use fulfilling the prophecies of 1984 and thought crime.
They will attempt to end crime in advance by reading your mind. I do not look forrward to the mind reading years, I think they will get things wrong. We have to try to hold onto our privacy rights as much as possible with what is coming for technology in the future.
(10-07-2017, 06:05 PM)titanic1 Wrote: [ -> ]Well apparently they have a mind reading machine which they will probably put to good use fulfilling the prophecies of 1984 and thought crime.
They will attempt to end crime in advance by reading your mind.  I do not look forrward to the mind reading years, I think they will get things wrong.  We have to try to hold onto our privacy rights as much as possible with what is coming for technology in the future.

The machine is called the "Human brain". Chuckle
your mind was never yours