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Full Version: For Millions, Life Without Medicaid Services Is No Option
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TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Frances Isbell has spinal muscular atrophy, a genetic disorder that has left her unable to walk or even roll over in bed. But Ms. Isbell has a personal care assistant through Medicaid, and the help allowed her to go to law school at the University of Alabama here. She will graduate next month.

She hopes to become a disability rights lawyer — “I’d love to see her on the Supreme Court someday,” her aide, Christy Robertson, said, tearing up with emotion as Ms. Isbell prepared to study for the bar exam in her apartment last week — but staying independent will be crucial to her professional future.

“The point of these programs is to give people options and freedom,” said Ms. Isbell, 24, whose family lives a few hours away in Gadsden.

The care she gets is an optional benefit under federal Medicaid law, which means each state can decide whether to offer it and how much to spend. Optional services that she and millions of other Medicaid beneficiaries receive would be particularly at risk under Republican proposals to scale back Medicaid as part of legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Those services include dental care for adults, long-term care for disabled and elderly people living at home, certain therapies that children with disabilities receive in school, prosthetic limbs and even prescription drugs.

The battle over replacing the Affordable Care Act has focused intensely on the future of Medicaid, the state-federal health insurance program for the poor and vulnerable created more than 50 years ago as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society. Much of the debate has centered on Republican proposals to roll back the recent expansion of the program to millions of low-income adults without disabilities.

But the House and Senate bills would also make profound changes to the very nature of Medicaid, shifting it from an open-ended entitlement to a program with strict federal funding limits.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/for-mil...li=BBnbcA1

in our town, in the poor section across from the railroad tracks, some 180 people rely on medi-cal. and so do the 6800 other people residing in neighboring oakland etc
(07-01-2017, 11:06 PM)SR-25 Wrote: [ -> ]TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Frances Isbell has spinal muscular atrophy, a genetic disorder that has left her unable to walk or even roll over in bed. But Ms. Isbell has a personal care assistant through Medicaid, and the help allowed her to go to law school at the University of Alabama here. She will graduate next month.

She hopes to become a disability rights lawyer — “I’d love to see her on the Supreme Court someday,” her aide, Christy Robertson, said, tearing up with emotion as Ms. Isbell prepared to study for the bar exam in her apartment last week — but staying independent will be crucial to her professional future.

“The point of these programs is to give people options and freedom,” said Ms. Isbell, 24, whose family lives a few hours away in Gadsden.

The care she gets is an optional benefit under federal Medicaid law, which means each state can decide whether to offer it and how much to spend. Optional services that she and millions of other Medicaid beneficiaries receive would be particularly at risk under Republican proposals to scale back Medicaid as part of legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Those services include dental care for adults, long-term care for disabled and elderly people living at home, certain therapies that children with disabilities receive in school, prosthetic limbs and even prescription drugs.

The battle over replacing the Affordable Care Act has focused intensely on the future of Medicaid, the state-federal health insurance program for the poor and vulnerable created more than 50 years ago as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society. Much of the debate has centered on Republican proposals to roll back the recent expansion of the program to millions of low-income adults without disabilities.

But the House and Senate bills would also make profound changes to the very nature of Medicaid, shifting it from an open-ended entitlement to a program with strict federal funding limits.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/for-mil...li=BBnbcA1

in our town, in the poor section across from the railroad tracks, some 180 people rely on medi-cal. and so do the 6800 other people residing in neighboring oakland etc
In 2011,about the time the ACA went into effect,I lived in SC. I got a letter from medicaid stating that because of the changes assoxiated with ACA, I,as a disabled adult, would no longer be eligible for dental or vision. Va. did the same thing and there are other states with no dental or vision care for disabled adults.
Sounds to me like more states are following suit. Anon
here in california, we have denti-cal which allows medi-cal people the ability to get quality dental care. and vision care for adults is limited to exams only. kids are free i think..darn kids
(07-01-2017, 11:16 PM)MysticPizza Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-01-2017, 11:06 PM)SR-25 Wrote: [ -> ]TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Frances Isbell has spinal muscular atrophy, a genetic disorder that has left her unable to walk or even roll over in bed. But Ms. Isbell has a personal care assistant through Medicaid, and the help allowed her to go to law school at the University of Alabama here. She will graduate next month.

She hopes to become a disability rights lawyer — “I’d love to see her on the Supreme Court someday,” her aide, Christy Robertson, said, tearing up with emotion as Ms. Isbell prepared to study for the bar exam in her apartment last week — but staying independent will be crucial to her professional future.

“The point of these programs is to give people options and freedom,” said Ms. Isbell, 24, whose family lives a few hours away in Gadsden.

The care she gets is an optional benefit under federal Medicaid law, which means each state can decide whether to offer it and how much to spend. Optional services that she and millions of other Medicaid beneficiaries receive would be particularly at risk under Republican proposals to scale back Medicaid as part of legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Those services include dental care for adults, long-term care for disabled and elderly people living at home, certain therapies that children with disabilities receive in school, prosthetic limbs and even prescription drugs.

The battle over replacing the Affordable Care Act has focused intensely on the future of Medicaid, the state-federal health insurance program for the poor and vulnerable created more than 50 years ago as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society. Much of the debate has centered on Republican proposals to roll back the recent expansion of the program to millions of low-income adults without disabilities.

But the House and Senate bills would also make profound changes to the very nature of Medicaid, shifting it from an open-ended entitlement to a program with strict federal funding limits.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/for-mil...li=BBnbcA1

in our town, in the poor section across from the railroad tracks, some 180 people rely on medi-cal. and so do the 6800 other people residing in neighboring oakland etc
In 2011,about the time the ACA went into effect,I lived in SC. I got a letter from medicaid stating that because of the changes assoxiated with ACA, I,as a disabled adult, would no longer be eligible for dental or vision. Va. did the same thing and there are other states with no dental or vision care for disabled adults.
Sounds to me like more states are following suit.  Anon

If I am reading that correctly, it sounds to me like medicaid was better BEFORE Obamacare went into effect.

I do realize it wasn't perfect, but BOCare has done far more harm than good.
during obama's reign, medi-cal was reinstated for limited dental services for adults. previously, no dental services were offered for anyone over 21. only kids had full coverage. damm kids
(07-02-2017, 01:05 AM)Aquarius Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-01-2017, 11:16 PM)MysticPizza Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-01-2017, 11:06 PM)SR-25 Wrote: [ -> ]TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Frances Isbell has spinal muscular atrophy, a genetic disorder that has left her unable to walk or even roll over in bed. But Ms. Isbell has a personal care assistant through Medicaid, and the help allowed her to go to law school at the University of Alabama here. She will graduate next month.

She hopes to become a disability rights lawyer — “I’d love to see her on the Supreme Court someday,” her aide, Christy Robertson, said, tearing up with emotion as Ms. Isbell prepared to study for the bar exam in her apartment last week — but staying independent will be crucial to her professional future.

“The point of these programs is to give people options and freedom,” said Ms. Isbell, 24, whose family lives a few hours away in Gadsden.

The care she gets is an optional benefit under federal Medicaid law, which means each state can decide whether to offer it and how much to spend. Optional services that she and millions of other Medicaid beneficiaries receive would be particularly at risk under Republican proposals to scale back Medicaid as part of legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Those services include dental care for adults, long-term care for disabled and elderly people living at home, certain therapies that children with disabilities receive in school, prosthetic limbs and even prescription drugs.

The battle over replacing the Affordable Care Act has focused intensely on the future of Medicaid, the state-federal health insurance program for the poor and vulnerable created more than 50 years ago as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society. Much of the debate has centered on Republican proposals to roll back the recent expansion of the program to millions of low-income adults without disabilities.

But the House and Senate bills would also make profound changes to the very nature of Medicaid, shifting it from an open-ended entitlement to a program with strict federal funding limits.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/for-mil...li=BBnbcA1

in our town, in the poor section across from the railroad tracks, some 180 people rely on medi-cal. and so do the 6800 other people residing in neighboring oakland etc
In 2011,about the time the ACA went into effect,I lived in SC. I got a letter from medicaid stating that because of the changes assoxiated with ACA, I,as a disabled adult, would no longer be eligible for dental or vision. Va. did the same thing and there are other states with no dental or vision care for disabled adults.
Sounds to me like more states are following suit.  Anon

If I am reading that correctly, it sounds to me like medicaid was better BEFORE Obamacare went into effect.

I do realize it wasn't perfect, but BOCare has done far more harm than good.

In PA it wasn't better. Medicaid was all but impossible to get in PA before Obamacare. You had to be so poor to get it that you would end up dead because there was no medical care. I am disabled from a heart condition. If so called Trumpcare becomes law I along with thousands of others will be dead within weeks.

Trump doesn't give a damn about health care for the poor.
(07-02-2017, 01:05 AM)Aquarius Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-01-2017, 11:16 PM)MysticPizza Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-01-2017, 11:06 PM)SR-25 Wrote: [ -> ]TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Frances Isbell has spinal muscular atrophy, a genetic disorder that has left her unable to walk or even roll over in bed. But Ms. Isbell has a personal care assistant through Medicaid, and the help allowed her to go to law school at the University of Alabama here. She will graduate next month.

She hopes to become a disability rights lawyer — “I’d love to see her on the Supreme Court someday,” her aide, Christy Robertson, said, tearing up with emotion as Ms. Isbell prepared to study for the bar exam in her apartment last week — but staying independent will be crucial to her professional future.

“The point of these programs is to give people options and freedom,” said Ms. Isbell, 24, whose family lives a few hours away in Gadsden.

The care she gets is an optional benefit under federal Medicaid law, which means each state can decide whether to offer it and how much to spend. Optional services that she and millions of other Medicaid beneficiaries receive would be particularly at risk under Republican proposals to scale back Medicaid as part of legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Those services include dental care for adults, long-term care for disabled and elderly people living at home, certain therapies that children with disabilities receive in school, prosthetic limbs and even prescription drugs.

The battle over replacing the Affordable Care Act has focused intensely on the future of Medicaid, the state-federal health insurance program for the poor and vulnerable created more than 50 years ago as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society. Much of the debate has centered on Republican proposals to roll back the recent expansion of the program to millions of low-income adults without disabilities.

But the House and Senate bills would also make profound changes to the very nature of Medicaid, shifting it from an open-ended entitlement to a program with strict federal funding limits.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/for-mil...li=BBnbcA1

in our town, in the poor section across from the railroad tracks, some 180 people rely on medi-cal. and so do the 6800 other people residing in neighboring oakland etc
In 2011,about the time the ACA went into effect,I lived in SC. I got a letter from medicaid stating that because of the changes assoxiated with ACA, I,as a disabled adult, would no longer be eligible for dental or vision. Va. did the same thing and there are other states with no dental or vision care for disabled adults.
Sounds to me like more states are following suit.  Anon

If I am reading that correctly, it sounds to me like medicaid was better BEFORE Obamacare went into effect.

I do realize it wasn't perfect, but BOCare has done far more harm than good.

It was better. Not without problems but still.... the red tape involved was always stupid but they've gone full retard. They assign you a primary care doc here and if for some reason they wont see you-tough.
On the plus side,the ACA is what got me more off of my duff and researching how to not need a doctor.
Wait a minute here, she's 100% cripple and she somehow managed to go to law school?